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South Florida Palm ID


rttunc

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I recently walked the nature trails at the Hugh Taylor Birch state park in Fort Lauderdale, FL and ran across some very beautiful palms growing freely in the woods. I have had some difficulty identifying them, any help would be appreciated!  

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1: Serenoa Repens

2: Dypsis Lutescens (Not Native)

3: Ptychosperma Sp. or Adonidia Merrillii (Not Native)

4: Ptychosperma Elegans (Not Native)

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5 hours ago, idontknowhatnametuse said:

1: Serenoa Repens

2: Dypsis Lutescens (Not Native)

3: Ptychosperma Sp. or Adonidia Merrillii (Not Native)

4: Ptychosperma Elegans (Not Native)

#2 could be a Royal

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Palms not just a tree also a state of mind

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5 hours ago, Steve the palmreader said:

#2 could be a Royal

You're right, I forgot royals are Florida natives. I thought they were D. Lutescens because I heard they had become naturalized because people planted them a lot in their gardens.

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3 minutes ago, idontknowhatnametuse said:

You're right, I forgot royals are Florida natives. I thought they were D. Lutescens because I heard they had become naturalized because people planted them a lot in their gardens.

I forget too!

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Did you spot any of the remnant native Coccothrinax argentata that live in the park? Possibly the last wild examples of the species in coastal Broward County.

They are wonderful palms at any size.

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?nelat=26.2118599860931&nelng=-80.08716504628937&place_id=any&subview=map&swlat=26.07036502704655&swlng=-80.20396905117413&taxon_id=133690

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