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Trachycarpus in Lakeland


kinzyjr

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Apparently, you can grow a healthy trachycarpus here in Lakeland.  I stopped by the McDonald's at the intersection of Edgewood Ave. and South Florida Ave. today and noticed a very healthy trachycarpus.  Given past results here in median plantings, I wondered how old it was.  Apparently, this palm has been here since at least May of 2011.  That's 7 solid years of growth.  Here it is today:

20180513_100956_TrachycarpusLakeland_1024.jpg

Here is a picture from Google street view in 2011:

20110501_TrachyMcDonalds.png

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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7 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

Apparently, you can grow a healthy trachycarpus here in Lakeland.  I stopped by the McDonald's at the intersection of Edgewood Ave. and South Florida Ave. today and noticed a very healthy trachycarpus.  Given past results here in median plantings, I wondered how old it was.  Apparently, this palm has been here since at least May of 2011.  That's 7 solid years of growth.  Here it is today:

20180513_100956_TrachycarpusLakeland_1024.jpg

Here is a picture from Google street view in 2011:

20110501_TrachyMcDonalds.png

Nice one, especially for Lakeland (Central-South Florida)!

Does it get covered from direct sun?

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7 hours ago, Palmsbro said:

Nice one, especially for Lakeland (Central-South Florida)!

Does it get covered from direct sun?

It's location is on the north side of the building, so it does likely get some level of shade at points in the winter.  In the summer, the angle of the sun is ~89 degrees here, so I doubt that it gets much protection at that point.  My understanding was that nematodes were the main enemy here.

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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We take Trachies for granted here, and we really shouldn't.

I hope that little one survives.

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Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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Full sun in not problem for Trachycarpus fortunei even in hot climates ( if they have enough water ).

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Hardiness isn't a problem; it hasn't gone below 20F at any point in recorded history here.  If full sun isn't an issue (this site does have irrigation), that leaves nematodes as the last of potential causes for the lack of success that I have heard regarding this species in Florida.  I think I may try one of these guys now, too.

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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5 hours ago, Cikas said:

Soil also can be a problem 

Trachycarpus hate sand. 

Yes, although they surprisingly grow somewhat well farther from the coast in my area where the soil is quite sandy (given they receive regular irrigation and there is mulch, grass, or something other than open soil beneath), they do terrible closer to the coast/on the barrier islands where there is nothing but pure white beach sand- almost every one I see planted out there becomes stunted, yellowish, and dies.

Edited by Opal92
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From all of the commentary here, I'm becoming more and more confident that one (or more) will do well in my neck of the woods.  The soil is pretty rich, temperature is not a concern, and I have a partially shaded area that could use another palm.

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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Trachies do have to have their water. They used them a few times in roadway median plantings; many died during watering restrictions from thirst, alas. :(

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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1 minute ago, kinzyjr said:

From all of the commentary here, I'm becoming more and more confident that one (or more) will do well in my neck of the woods.  The soil is pretty rich, temperature is not a concern, and I have a partially shaded area that could use another palm.

Do try some!

Remember they're dioecious so you'll need males and females to hear the patter of little seeds.

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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Just now, DoomsDave said:

Do try some!

Remember they're dioecious so you'll need males and females to hear the patter of little seeds.

I definitely want to hear the pitter patter of little seeds :)

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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On 2018-05-15 13:20:23, Cikas said:

Soil also can be a problem 

Trachycarpus hate sand. 

thats probably why my Trachys like it at my place. Very much clay and I have improved the soil with lots of mulch and "fluff" :)

 

 

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****************************************************

Greetings from the southernmost Swedish town Trelleborg,

also known as the Palmcity.

USDA zone 7 with a good microclimate

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Nematodes don’t like concrete but the Trachycarpus don’t mind.  Plant them near concrete like they did at McDonalds.

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Land O Lakes FL, a suburb on the North Side of Tampa, FL

Summers are great, 90f/32c in the day & 70f/21c at night with plentiful rain & sun

Winters are subtropical with occasional frosts and freezes. Tropical cyclones happen.

We have a few Royal palms in the warm microclimates but Coconuts freeze.

I am a Kayaker, Hiker, Bicyclist, and amateur Photographer that loves the outdoors.  

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/19/2018, 9:29:33, Keith in SoJax said:

Nematodes don’t like concrete but the Trachycarpus don’t mind.  Plant them near concrete like they did at McDonalds.

You might have something there, @Keith in SoJax.  Found three more today and they have lots of pavement around them as well:

 

20180528_192407_ThreeTrachies_Smaller.png

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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I have trachycarpus latisamus in the same county, Davenport Florida for 5 years. Waggy does like sand. Fortuni I planted in white sand in Melbourne Florida it seems to be doing good,

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Thank you for the comment, @Bert.  Welcome to the forum, as well!

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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  • 3 weeks later...

Why don't they plant trachycarpus in South/Central Florida? They grow like weeds in the Carolinas and Virginia. 

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Zone 8a/8b Greenville, NC 

Zone 9a/9b Bluffton, SC

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@NC_PalmsThey tend to have issues with nematodes.  Others say that they have issues with the combination of full sun, heat, and humidity at our latitude.  Others disagree. (See comments from @Palmsbro, @Keith in SoJax, @Opal92, @Cikas, etc. above)  Either way, not many of them make it here.  Finding 4 thriving specimens is unusual here.  If you count the ones @Bert has, it's the most I've heard of living in C. FL.

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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At least 15-20 large trunked trachys planted along the renovated I-4 interchange at Kirkman Rd in Orlando. Interesting choice as they are not common around the area. They look good. 

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On 6/18/2018, 7:35:47, kinzyjr said:

@NC_PalmsThey tend to have issues with nematodes.  Others say that they have issues with the combination of full sun, heat, and humidity at our latitude.  Others disagree. (See comments from @Palmsbro, @Keith in SoJax, @Opal92, @Cikas, etc. above)  Either way, not many of them make it here.  Finding 4 thriving specimens is unusual here.  If you count the ones @Bert has, it's the most I've heard of living in C. FL.

Definitely the nematodes IMHO.  I had a nice sized 6 footer or so growing in a pot for years from a 7 gallon size.  I live in SW Florida.  Outside year round.   Did great.  Full sun, heat and humidity.   Once I planted it...died within a year.  Huge mistake!  I have 3 waggies in pots outside year round for the past 3 years.  No issues.  Great little palm with those stiff leaves.  They will never go in the ground in here or guaranteed a loss.  

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Sorry if this offends anyone but I have to ask, given the fact that Florida (even zone 9a) must be able to grow a huge number of MUCH more interesting palms than Trachies, why bother? Is it just the thrill of the rare? 

Waimarama New Zealand (39.5S, 177E)

Oceanic temperate

summer 25C/15C

winter 15C/6C

No frost, no heat

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Mine, about 10 years old and around 7 feet tall, died of apparently too much heat late last year.  Just stopped putting out full sized leaves and failed.  It was in partial shade.  

The other side of the yard seems to have a creeping nematode invasion, with the St. Augustine grass gradually going from thriving to failing along a line maybe six feet wide.  It seems to go back to the next door neighbor ordering a truckload of "top soil."

 

 

 

Fla. climate center: 100-119 days>85 F
USDA 1990 hardiness zone 9B
Current USDA hardiness zone 10a
4 km inland from Indian River; 27º N (equivalent to Brisbane)

Central Orlando's urban heat island may be warmer than us

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Its mainly the nematodes that cause their death. But with them weakened from nematodes and mix in the heat and humidity and dry sand during a drought they will die.

I have seen some around here grow for years happily then just quickly die. I have never seen a Trachycarpus over about 7-8ft tall here.

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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Here are the new trachys along I-4 in Orlando (at the Turnpike exit). It's a trachy farm! Either somebody wants to change the landscape or this was a big mixup. 

 

PSX_20180627_150207.jpg

PSX_20180627_150235.jpg

Edited by pj_orlando_z9b
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18 hours ago, Bennz said:

Sorry if this offends anyone but I have to ask, given the fact that Florida (even zone 9a) must be able to grow a huge number of MUCH more interesting palms than Trachies, why bother? Is it just the thrill of the rare? 

I find them interesting. :)

 

6 hours ago, pj_orlando_z9b said:

Here are the new trachys along I-4 in Orlando (at the Turnpike exit). It's a trachy farm! Either somebody wants to change the landscape or this was a big mixup.

That's interesting.  It will be even more interesting if they live for a long time.

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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On 27. 06. 2018., Bennz said:

Sorry if this offends anyone but I have to ask, given the fact that Florida (even zone 9a) must be able to grow a huge number of MUCH more interesting palms than Trachies, why bother? Is it just the thrill of the rare? 

People always want to plant things which are rare and hard to grow in their area. For people from tropical climates, cocos is boring. In my opinion Trachycarpus is beautiful palm. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

That's a giant waste of Trachy's on that I-4 Planting... What a shame.  I know where those originated from as well.

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  • 11 months later...
On 5/28/2018 at 8:13 PM, kinzyjr said:

You might have something there, @Keith in SoJax.  Found three more today and they have lots of pavement around them as well:

 

20180528_192407_ThreeTrachies_Smaller.png

Just an update on these three - All still growing happily.  The one furthest to the left may flower this year:

20190703_164241_Trachycarpus_Flowering_1600.jpg

  • Upvote 2

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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I think the ones along I4 will slowly die off in the next ten years, but one never knows.

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  • 1 year later...
On 6/27/2018 at 8:35 AM, Eric in Orlando said:

Its mainly the nematodes that cause their death. But with them weakened from nematodes and mix in the heat and humidity and dry sand during a drought they will die.

I have seen some around here grow for years happily then just quickly die. I have never seen a Trachycarpus over about 7-8ft tall here.

I was doing some research on this palm specific to Florida the other day because I bought one and came across this thread. 

Just now I stopped at a McDonald’s outside Lakeland saw this guy! Looks to be doing pretty well which is encouraging. D1389C41-B8F3-4469-B92E-975A212CB150.thumb.jpeg.fd0dd9f1d2c2419d58e3f01a64453550.jpeg

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Former South Florida resident living in the Greater Orlando Area, zone 9b.

Constantly wishing I could still grow zone 10 palms worry-free, but also trying to appease my strange fixation with Washingtonias. 

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7 hours ago, chad2468emr said:

I was doing some research on this palm specific to Florida the other day because I bought one and came across this thread. 

Just now I stopped at a McDonald’s outside Lakeland saw this guy! Looks to be doing pretty well which is encouraging. D1389C41-B8F3-4469-B92E-975A212CB150.thumb.jpeg.fd0dd9f1d2c2419d58e3f01a64453550.jpeg

Looks like Copernicia Alba,   good find nonetheless!

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7 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Looks like Copernicia Alba,   good find nonetheless!

I think you're right.  We have a lot of Copernicia alba around.  With the old leaf bases and no hair on the trunk.  @chad2468emr do you remember which street this was on?  I'll take my own stab in the dark based on what I know about the area and say this was the palm in question:

https://www.google.com/maps/@28.0342361,-82.055619,3a,75y,206.43h,90.28t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1syO5ajYDr_yaMzEl_7nsZRA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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Ive seen a few Trachycarpus on the Gulf Coast recently,

Clearwater Beach

20210202_141131.thumb.jpg.c32730a4d0460189e8816f9e279154d4.jpg

Crystal River, 

20210131_175926_(1).jpg.f38f6101ebfd781db4e11ac0a7dc5bed.jpg

Hudson Beach area.

20210128_113526(1)_(1).jpg.901be7acce4fda9f78e52069f3d8f2c9.jpg

Some more in a group planting in Clearwater

20210202_134513_HDR.thumb.jpg.a8bed23427f325783ff08d5ea3644ec5.jpg

20210202_134508_HDR.thumb.jpg.961e6adb3f48d1cdfba1ed1bfd957f87.jpg

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On 6/27/2018 at 3:06 PM, pj_orlando_z9b said:

Here are the new trachys along I-4 in Orlando (at the Turnpike exit). It's a trachy farm! Either somebody wants to change the landscape or this was a big mixup. 

 

PSX_20180627_150207.jpg

PSX_20180627_150235.jpg

Are any of these still there?  I don't recall seeing any on my recent trips.

The ones planted similarly at I4 and Maitland Blvd. all died in short order.

-Michael

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All the ones at I4 and the Turnpike have died or been removed. Replaced with mostly Livistona nitida and L. decora.

The most recently planted at !4 and Maitland are still alive but only for a short time. The first ones planted by the NE ramps died off after a couple years. There was also a big row off them planted along a sound wall at I4 south of Par. They lasted less than a year, replaced with Sabal palmetto.

Its amazing and sad that despite them dying they still plant new ones. Either the state is getting scammed or the landscaper has no knowledge , or both. Its good they have been planting X Butyagrus, Copernicia alba, Livistona decora and L. nitida. Would love to see Bismarckia, Livistona chinensis and Sabal causiarum used like they have along the Turnpike

 

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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2 hours ago, Eric in Orlando said:

they have been planting X Butyagrus, Copernicia alba, Livistona decora and L. nitida. Would love to see Bismarckia, Livistona chinensis and Sabal causiarum used like they have along the Turnpike

 

Great to see a little creativity in the plantings, wish more places would do the same, agree with the additional suggestions, should be used a lot more.

Corpus Christi, TX, near salt water, zone 9b/10a! Except when it isn't and everything gets nuked.

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15 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

I think you're right. 

 

16 hours ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Looks like Copernicia Alba,   good find nonetheless!

Maaaaaaaaaan, you know, as soon as I had posted it I was like "Wait... theres no fuzzies on that trunk. That crown is huge, and those leaf bases are really uniform. It might be copernicia." and now I've lost some street cred on my palm ID skills! In the defense of my bruised ego, most of my palm ID skills were developed in South Florida and finding them down there is certainly a rarity to say the least, haha. 

@kinzyjr I think this was at the intersection of County Line Rd and Frontage Road S. There was this one and one with an even larger crown in the parking lot. May have been more I'd missed as well.

3 hours ago, Eric in Orlando said:

...and Sabal causiarum used like they have along the Turnpike

 

@Eric in Orlando Where along the turnpike have you seen these? I don't drive on the turnpike often, but I'd love to see that. 

Edited by chad2468emr

Former South Florida resident living in the Greater Orlando Area, zone 9b.

Constantly wishing I could still grow zone 10 palms worry-free, but also trying to appease my strange fixation with Washingtonias. 

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