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    Jim in Los Altos

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/14/2024 in all areas

  1. Hi everyone ! Since I get precious advices and great pictures from old post I though I should introduce myself. I live in Guadeloupe, French West Indies. I have bought my house 3 years ago with a totally virgin garden, and have been planting since. I am lucky to have nice weather for palm tree, and have been able to have 40+ species. Most of them a young, started from seedling, or even from the seeds. Here are some pictures of my garden, hope you like it.
    30 points
  2. I've since moved away from where I grew up/planted stuff since my teens (now 26) but I'm back in my garden for the weekend 😁. Can you tell I like zonepushing? Hopefully we get some normal to mild winters soon so the stuff on borrowed time can live a little longer under canopy. It's a celebration every time this Cyphophoenix elegans makes a new leaf Prime time for Euterpe edulis Lanonia dasyantha Chuniophoenix nana and a Chambeyronia pyriformis seedling Licuala fordiana Chuniophoenix hainanensis Chamaedorea cataractum back from the ground after 18F and a Everglades palm (how do you spell that Latin name LOL) direct seeded Lytocaryum hoehnei making a comeback after record heat, drought, and freeze Sable rosei Ravenea rivularis that refuses to die I have several of these Chamaedorea radicalis (thanks DoomsDave) spread throughout the yard, they are indestructible Livistona saribus I hope Sabal causarium is going crazy this year (and so is the Bahía grass LOL) Hoping for many many years with this Bismarckia Sable guatemalensis Livistona nitida Making Houston Queen palms ubiquitous again
    21 points
  3. Who would have thought that these cool climate, shade loving palms would tolerate full all day sun as tiny seedlings. I harvested some seeds from the parent tree in the front yard and plopped some in various places in the yard last summer. These pictured, sprouted in full sun later last summer in areas that heat way up in the afternoon. One in the ground and two in a pot. They’ve endured many days in the 90s F with no burning. I’m baffled by this. Only a few of the full shade seeds sprouted and they are smaller, albeit deeper green, than the full sun ones. Anyone else in a warm inland area experienced this? We’ve had three above 90°F days this May already. Luckily nighttime temps drop to mid and upper 50s.
    20 points
  4. The flower on this pinanga speciosa
    18 points
  5. Aa recent post by Tracy and a response by Dale concerning Chrysalidocarpus pilulifer, jogged my memory about the recent naming of C. paucifolius, aka ‘Orange Crush.’ The old name is so catchy, the correct one doesn’t roll off the tongue quire as easy. Anyway, here are a couple of specimens that are showing that trademark orange crown shaft. The small one is growing in almost solid rock, the larger one with a fair amount of soil. They are the same age. Tim
    16 points
  6. After a few “torturous” years for this palm in the backyard, it’s finally giving me hope for a ruby red crown shaft. Its recovery from heavy fronds falling on it, breaking every leaf and the same thing happening a second time, has been slow but steady. I have bamboo stalks protecting it now. Anyway, RED has shown for the first time on its stem and I’m excited about that because these can have anywhere from dull-beige pink to a vivid red coloration and when bigger can be incredible if vivid red in color.
    16 points
  7. First flower on this Chrysalidocarpus Hovomantsina Hybrid
    16 points
  8. A couple of big Chrysalidocarpus hybrids dropped leaves today showing some nice coloring. This is Chrysalidocarpus Robustus hybrid: and this one is Chrysalidocarpus Prestonianus Hybrid:
    15 points
  9. And here’s Chrysalidocarpus Hovomantsina Hybrid showing its first flower after a leaf drop. The inflorescence cover is almost black which really stands out from the white crown shaft.
    14 points
  10. It has rained a little for 2-3 days in a row now, and everybody perked up. Hopefully it’s the start of the rains for the wet season, as it’s been a hot, dry spring. I went outside for rainbow shots after this evening’s shower, but there was none. Instead, just took some random front yard pics…. Ugh, Weeds are enjoying the rain too… Some palms trunking after a few years…
    14 points
  11. Today this Licuala spinosa caught my eye. I never imagined it would get this big.
    13 points
  12. The older grizzled palm collectors will remember one of Dr. "Mardigascar" Darian's rare and newly introduced palms from 25-30 years ago he named "White Stem." There were only a few ever available, and I don't know if any still exist in So. California. We had all hoped that as more and more palms from Madagascar became available that this palm would eventually be found and seeds collected again. It was suspected that a palm eventually named Dypsis robusta (now a Chrysalidocarpus) was this fabled palm because of a very distinctive trait of backward pointing basal leaflets at the base of the petiole as a juvenile. Looking at my C. robusta today I was noticing that this trait has become very pronounced, and will probably soon morph into a more regular common appearance like most palms. But until then, it is making a strong case, and I remain convinced this palm is the Whilte Stem. Has this now been accepted (or doubted) by any of the other older collectors who remember this palm.
    13 points
  13. All, Here’s the Sabal that has had an untimely demise… And here’s the 15G Jubaea X Butia from Jungle Music waiting to be planted. Will update with photos soon once its in the ground.
    13 points
  14. I have some Howea palms around the house and some have this swollen”foot” . They are all very happy and I even have two volunteers that are growing. They just love Southern California. This one has a real “elephant” sized foot , at least 3x bigger than any I’ve seen. It was randomly planted too close to the house but it always looked so happy there I never moved it on. When I got it , it was in a field of seedlings outside a huge greenhouse that used to sell Kentia’s commercially , by the thousands! The owner , who I sold seed to , told me I could take “all you want”! I don’t know if they were just spill over or what , this was a huge operation. There was this one seedling that stood out . It had very dark foliage and was double the size of its siblings. I dug it up wrapped it in a napkin and planted it right after we bought this house. The picture shows my 10.5 sized foot . Nature can always be surprising , especially after two consecutive wet years! Harry
    13 points
  15. Here is the current progress. Left to right, Sabal uresana, needle palm, Livistona nitida, Brahea decumbens, Serenoa repens, Sabal bermudana
    12 points
  16. My background is in plant breeding/genetics (MSc) but afaik heterosis/hybrid vigor is still not completely understood on the genetic level. There are two prevailing theories: "dominance" and "overdominance". Dominance argues that inbreeding depression (crossing with genetically similar parents) leads to homozygosity over time which is an accumulation of deleterious alleles ("bad forms" of a gene) which decreases fitness/vigor; thereby, outcrossing (breeding with a genetically different parent) to create an F1 hybrid leads to heterozygosity which in simple terms means the different parent contributes a "good/different form of a gene" and that one "good/different form of a gene" is enough to override/surpess negative effects from one "bad form of a gene". This might explain why F2 (offspring of an F1 hybrid) hybrids are generally inferior, you lose the dominance effect due to genetic reshuffling thus resulting in more homozygosity. Overdominance argues that heterozygosity itself is advantageous over any form of homozygosity. The classic example in humans is sickle cell anemia and malaria. A parent that is homozygous dominant (carries two "good forms of red blood cell gene") does not have sickle cell anemia (good) but is not resistant to malaria. A parent that is homozygous recessive (carries two "bad forms of a red blood cell gene") has sickle cell anemia (bad) but is resistant to malaria. Their offspring will be heterozygous (carry one "good form" and one "bad form") and not have sickle cell anemia but also have malaria resistance (superior). This could also explain why F1 hybrids are superior (heterozygote advantage). Many traits are polygenic and not easily explained by the Mendelian model (simple two forms of a gene configuring a trait...it gets really complicated quickly), but that's the gist. Hope it makes sense
    12 points
  17. Is anyone growing Attalea rostrata? Quite an impressive palm! I have been spending a few days on Costa Rica's pacific coast and went to the Parque Nacional Carara (near Jaco). Ignoring the deferred trail maintenance, it is a really neat park (maybe 8km in total trails). I found a little research paper (in Spanish) that describes the vegetation of the park: "Vegetacion del Parque Nacional Carara, Costa Rica" (from 2001) https://epidendra.com/parquesnacionales/carara/jimenez_grayum_carara.pdf Anyway, the dominant palm species around here appears to be Attalea rostrata. It is a large, truly impressive palm and super abundant in the park and along the country side. It looks like this should be a super-easy palm and grows nicely in the shady forest as well as in sunny exposed positions. Strangely, though, it does not seem to be common in cultivation outside of its native range. Even Palmpedia's page is a tad anemic. Now, there is this urge to find a seed source 🙂. Anyway, I think this may qualify as a must-have if you have the space.
    11 points
  18. A palm I purchased as Chrysalidocarpus (Dypsis at the time) "Jurassic Park", which is opening a new frond drew my attention the last couple of days.
    11 points
  19. The time has come for another palm update! We thank all customers and fans for your continued support and are thrilled to offer a new selection of palms to help your garden or nursery have a wide range of diverse and beautiful species. As usual we have species from all over the tropics, starting off we have two holy grail Licualas at an impressive one gallon size (shipped in 4in pot): the flying saucer leaf Licuala cordata and the mottled beauty Licuala mattanensis “mapu”. These are tough to find at this size, and usually have to be imported, which adds a lot of complication and time. You can add these to your collection with 2 day shipping, only $125/ea! Next up we have the bifid wonder from French Guiana, Asterogyne guianensis. This palm is perfect for an eye-level understory spot, the wide leaves and the interesting spicate inflorescences make a great accent and talking point. Available in 4 inch size at $20/ea. On the remote and beautiful Rodrigues Island (Mauritius), the rare and handsome palm Dictyosperma album v. aureum is the rarer cousin of the other Dictyosperma on neighboring islands. With a pale white crownshaft, it catches the eye and makes for a great talking point. Fast in the right conditions and can handle coastal gardens. Available as seedlings for $8/ea. Another spectacular Licuala species, the Malaysian Licuala thoana, has various leaf forms and stays at a short size so you can see it in all its glory every time you walk through the garden. 4inch specimens available for $12.50/ea. And of course we need a species from Madagascar to round out this update, so we’re happy that Dypsis rosea is available again in 4inch pots. This palm really has to be seen in person to appreciate its stunning beauty, from the bow-tie leaflets, pink tinted crownshaft when the oldest leaf falls, and large, chandelier-like inflorescences. $8.50/ea. But that’s not all! These species plus many more can be found on our updated price list. You can easily filter out the new items by typing (N) into the search bar on the price list, and there are plenty of others to browse through while you’re there! View Price List We are happy to keep your passions alive and gardens growing! Thank you and happy gardening, Jeff, Su, and the Floribunda crew
    11 points
  20. Just thought I'd share my Beccariophoenix Alfredii with you. I purchased it as a 15 gallon last year around this time and as expected, it didn't do much. Now it's starting out it's second growing season here and pushing 2 beautiful new fronds at once. I'll plan to update it in this thread overtime. I'm in Zone 9b. For context, I was lucky to have a mild winter (lowest was 31) to allow this palm to settle in. From what I've read, they root out first before pushing growth up top.
    11 points
  21. I stayed close to my porch as wanted to limit getting wet for the second time today. Just snapped a few photos before thunder ended my photos for the day. Pelagodoxa henryana Licuala mattanensis ‘mapu’ Handkerchief tree sold with no label. Awaiting blooms to identify unless one of you know. Some Brownea or Maniltoa? I love the lavender white new leaves. Cryosophila warscewiczii Small Amherstia nobilis in my shadehouse Johannesteijsmannia altifrons and some Itaya amicarums Back outside bright and early (just after dawn) tomorrow to work on “detailing” of multiple planting locations. Prime planting time although also prime ox beetle attack time.
    11 points
  22. My front planter wall was failing so we’re in the process of rebuilding it. The demo has revealed the reason why the Dypsis heteromorpha are pencil necking and yellowing uncontrollably. The Howea forsteriana on the other hand are handling the cramped conditions quite well. The new wall will be farther out and effectively double their space
    11 points
  23. Please post if you have any of these specimens. This happens to be a very tall and old King Palm for our area. The two (2) Thrinax radiata may not be the tallest around here but they are indigenous. Would love to see pictures of these palms from all areas around the world.
    11 points
  24. A few of the areas where they are used here below. These will be just some of the stars of the Summer 2024 CFPACS Meeting here in town. Barnett Park: Hollis Gardens: https://www.palmtalk.org/forum/topic/18482-hollis-gardens-in-lakeland-florida/ City Hall - South Entrance: First shown on the Remarkable Palms of Tampa Bay thread.
    11 points
  25. Had 3 palms go through some stuff a couple months ago. Chrysalidocarpus carlsmithii, Calyptrocalyx hollrungii and Archotophoenix tuckeri. The Carlsmithii got some crown rot and had a partial spear pull. Most likely moisture sitting in the crown. I’ve had this one in the ground for over 2 years and would have been bummed to lose all that progress. I had to treat this one several times before I saw improvement. I applied HP waited 2 hours then applied Daconil 3 times a week for 2 weeks. I also applied copper but only to the base of the palm 2 or 3 times. I kept seeing bubbles when I applied the peroxide so I kept on until it stopped. Same for the Hollrungii except the whole spear came out. Not sure the cause. Its been in a pot for 2 years or so. This one I used the same method but only twice then forgot about it for a couple weeks. Then noticed a new spear! The Tuckeri was accidentally drenched with gasoline. When temperatures started to rise the vent on my boat sprayed gas on the palm over a few days 😞 This one I treated on and off for a month but figured it was a goner. Then about 3 weeks ago it sprung back to life with some vigor. The first complete frond is stunted but the next new spear is growing fast. Last month all 3 were bad enough that I was planning their replacements. Fast forward to today and I think I can safely say that all 3 will pull through! I used a combination of Hydrogen Peroxide, Daconil and copper fungicide using methods learned here from the good folks on Palmtalk. Thanks @Merlyn @sonoranfans and others. It pays to fuss over your garden I think. I’m out there looking at everything as often as I can and catching little issues almost every time I look. Thanks again PT!
    11 points
  26. @LeonardHolmes thanks! Shipping was: $214. It arrived in 4 days. @Sabal King / @SailorBold Heres a few photos from today after getting it in the ground last night.
    11 points
  27. Found this lot displayed this afternoon there is actually 4 in a row but it was difficult to get all 4 in one photo but definitely a display for the chambeyronia lovers
    11 points
  28. Back in late 2022 Hurricane Ian tore all our gardens apart. We lost dozens and dozens of palms and tropical trees and continue to lose others almost two years later. Members of PT generously donated replacement palms for which I will be eternally grateful. We lost 80%+ of our shade canopy - it's returning, but slowly. Early in 2023, my husband's lymphoma returned but this time did not respond to chemo. He became very sick and we were unable lay mulch, fertilize or plant. Our usual rainy season was replaced by record heat and drought. By midsummer he was accepted into Moffitt Cancer Center for CART treatment using his own engineered cells. We spent most of last fall living in Airbnbs while he was hospitalized for weeks.When we finally moved home I was his sole caretaker for the following 6 months. The winter was wet, sunless and chilly and I couldn't work in the yard until April. But starting a few weeks ago we were well enough to contemplate whether we could tackle yard work again. We bought multiple pallets of mulch and paid several people to spread it. We also bought about a dozen bags of time release fertilizer and managed to spread it before the mulch. I have also been repotting Aspidistras and investigating potted philodendrons. It's still something of a struggle finding shady areas to place them. We have palm seedlings we germinated as replacements for the many dead/dying palms. But the weather has turned hot and dry so we don't dare plant anything outside the irrigation zone for fear it will be burned to a crisp by sun and lack of rain. Planting will have to wait until at least mid-June. As I have posted few, perhaps no, yard photos for the past year +, yesterday I snapped some shots of our back yard jungle and part of the Garden Lot. First up: A few background photos Back Yard Jungle from the East Back Yard Jungle & Rhapis laosensis looking east Cocos nucifera looking SE in Back Yard Jungle Back Yard Jungle looking east Jungle Palms Areca catechu Semi-Dwarf Hydriastele beguinii 'Obi Island' Howea belmoreana Attalea butyracea 'Mutant Leaf' Howea forsteriana Ravenea julietiae Golden Adonidia merrillii Chambeyronia houailou Carpoxylon macrospermum Syagrus schizophylla Licuala rumphii i Large Cocos nucifera in Back Yard Jungle More photos tomorrow. Enjoy
    11 points
  29. Today I went to a lowes near Me and saw the whole outside of the garden center flooded by palms the species that was there was Christmas palm Triangle palm Foxtail palm Dioon Bismark Coconut palm Florida thatch palm Fishtail palm Areca palm Bottle palm The address for this lowes is 10070 Estero Commons Place,Estero FL 33928
    10 points
  30. I have not posted in a while but always taking lots of photos so here are a few recent photos of the garden: I have finally got a good water system working in the garden so this year should be a good one for the palms and plants! like usual I have projects here there and everywhere so hopefully I can put some progress photos at the end of summer.
    10 points
  31. Zero issues. The small plants/flowers act as a living mulch. As far as water in summer most palms will like it. As you may have seen I never just plant a palm, it’s treated like any other plant in the overall landscape. Palms just don’t randomly grow with nothing around them. They are part of an ecosystem. Nature hates bare ground. One general rule of gardening is to plant things that have similar water requirements near one another. So there are plenty of low water plants available in Texas, both native and non native.
    10 points
  32. Here’s one I planted a few years later. I actually did a group planting but only one survived.
    10 points
  33. Faster than Pembana for me. Planted April 2019 Yesterday
    10 points
  34. @DoomsDave, I was at Bob’s house today in Fullerton with @Palmiz and saw a bunch of Mayotte. They seem to grow great for him. Here’s a picture of one. -dale
    10 points
  35. I agree with Jim, one of the most beautiful palms there is. I have tried all three types here. The var rubrum grows reasonably well in the right spot, but it’s hard to believe it’s the same species. It’s definitely the least attractive of the three as it gets a bit taller. I’m also trying the “standard“ species, they’re just a bit more cold, sensitive, and slow as heck here. The best looking one (imo) is var conjugatum (or furfuraceum, one in the same), but holy cow is it slow. By far the slowest of the three. Still, here in Southern California if you’ve got 20 years to burn waiting for something to be head high it’s a beaut.
    10 points
  36. Noticed another royal in Jax today driving along Julington Creek. Looks like it's fried most winters but does a decent job rebounding. Appears to have been there since at least Jan 2017 as far as I can tell from street view history.
    10 points
  37. Here is my Sabal minor 'Bountstown dwarf' flowering https://www.youtube.com/shorts/eVEGtd5lk2o
    10 points
  38. It's been a long time coming, I dug this washie from the lot and took a chance. Out of the two, only this one survived after getting mowed down by whoever is maintaining the lot, winter, and me digging it up, which was on Friday, October 14, 2022. I just now, today, finally planted it in its new home! 🤠
    10 points
  39. While industriously placing some finishing touches on my newly installed fish pond, I chanced to see my little Angel Face wandering about with something green in her mouth. I had to extricate myself from a very awkward position (on my bum, in the mud, wedged between a Bangalow palm and the pond) and go to find out what she was merrily munching upon. It was only my Chamaedorea metallica that took me 3 years to find. Nobody has them now, not even at the last 3 PACSOA shows had any. Immediate first aid was required. There was no time to go hunting for the seedling pot or burrow through 50 cubic metres of the pot pile to find one. In desperation I grabbed some seaweed solution and the nearest cup from the cupboard ( a 1968 Mikasa, Silk Flowers for those with taste enough to show interest) and placed my poor wounded baby in it, to soak up all those revitalising vitamins. As it was out of the pot anyway, I decided to pot it up a tiny fraction. Yes I know it's totally the wrong time of year but it is now a house pet so won't really know the Winter Solstice is almost upon us. Three days have passed since this disastrous incident occurred and the little palm is recuperating beautifully in it's updated residence. I have included a photo of him today and another shot of the callously unrepentant Angel Face. (making a rather rude face for the camera) Peachy
    9 points
  40. Three Dypsis hovomantsina, now Chrysalidocarpus, were purchased in April 2011 in 4-inch pots from Floribunda. They were potted up and grown until planted in the garden July 2014. They were brothers, always together, growing and looking like identical triplets. They were planted fairly close to each other, but each in a different situation: one on low hill made from local soil piled up during construction of a path, the 2nd in a low spot a short distance away, and the 3rd up on a higher mound created years before when part of the area was cleared and logs, soil and rocks were piled up and rotted and compacted over time. The one on the highest mound was thickly consumed in weeds off and on over the years, and was the last to form a trunk. I uncovered it again yesterday and this was the trunk reveal: The more mature siblings look like this: Any idea what might explain the pronounced difference?
    9 points
  41. Jim we are a little down the road, have you had the reveal yet to find out if it was an inflorescence hiding underneath. My larger specimen which is a double is still working on the first ring. Maybe by the end of this summer or in the fall it will happen on the larger trunk. The last boot that came off was about 2-3 inches below the soil, so I'm guessing about three more boots to come off before ringed trunk is above the soil line.
    9 points
  42. 9 points
  43. First flower on my Decipiens hybrid and it’s massive! And the crown shafts are developing a nice lime green color to them. Entire plant:
    9 points
  44. 9 points
  45. I accidentally sprayed some small volunteer Trachys with Roundup . The Mugwort was so thick I didn't realize that I was spraying the volunteer Trachys too , which were under the leaves of the Mugwort . My idea was to cut off the Trachy fronds which contained most of the chemical and it worked . The palms are growing out nicely in just a few weeks . Will All the fronds were cut off of these small Trachys . Update on my Washy below too .
    9 points
  46. One thing to remember is that it is impossible to over water an Archontophoenix (King Palm) but VERY easy to underwater one. They do exceptionally well in the shade so, when in full sun, with hot drying winds, they will be a bit more of a challenge. I have over fifty of them in my Bay Area landscape and they all are kept well watered. Three are actually growing IN stagnant water 365 days per year and they love it. I’d put a wood mulch around them and all surrounding soil areas 2-3” in depth. Water well beyond the drip line of the palms too because dry soil will act like a sponge and suck waster away from the palm’s root ball. Also, their roots travel as much as 40 feet away in time so those roots will benefit from irrigation to companion plants that eventually are planted nearby if they are well irrigated.
    9 points
  47. There’s a lot to see in the botanical gardens in Sydney with such a large space the grounds are in near perfect condition
    9 points
  48. With a visit to the botanical gain Sydney there are so many palms in good condition it’s just a photographers paradise with so many subjects all wanting to display there beauty but definitely full credit to the gardeners in Sydney growing such great palms so enjoy what’s on offer in such a beautiful garden right in the middle of Sydney well worth a visit to anyone visiting Sydney in Australia
    9 points
  49. I always love stepping out every morning to drive my kids to school. My first view is what I call "David and Goliath". They both keep growing and getting nicer and nicer. Jubaea and Chamaerops "volcano"
    9 points
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