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  1. Dave was generous enough to let me tour his garden the other day! Unfortunately, he wasn't present to give a personalized tour of the garden. Click Here for the complete list of photos with my attempted IDs. Feel free to chime in.
    36 points
  2. 2 growing seasons after the deep freeze of Feb 2021 in Dallas. Low of 3F with 10 consecutive days below freezing. Here are the observations in my gardens These palms were unprotected during this event we were also without power for 3 days very cold in house when it is 3F outdoors brahea armata was defoliated 12 foot tall green form chamaerhops humild killed to the ground Sabal Lisa defoliated chamaedorea microspadix killed to tte ground Nannorhops richtiana killed to ground woolly tomentum if Nannorhops richtiana chamaerops Humilis cerifera sabsl Lisa defoliated Sabal Louisiana un damaged foliage Sabal uresana defoliated Chamaerhops Humilis cerifera defoliated trunks remained intact washingtonia filifera defoliated brahea moorei defoliated Chamaerhops Humilis cerifera defoliated trunks remained intact brahea decumbens defoliated sabal Lisa jubea chilensis
    25 points
  3. With the help of my LED flashlight during a night walk, I was able to capture an atypical view of this palm!
    24 points
  4. Dang, sometimes you don’t look at your own garden enough! A visitor earlier today noticed it and called it to my attention. Well, I was distracted yesterday by a mass PRA in HB in the OC. Chambeyronia Houailou out in front of my house, putting up a nice new red leaf.
    19 points
  5. Carted this heavy beast home yesterday… think I have a spot picked but watching the sun today to see when it’s shades it out. May need more sun but we’ll see. Back to moving rocks and digging.
    19 points
  6. Clinostigma with @Josh-O for scale.
    18 points
  7. 17 points
  8. Distance view of All American Madagascarensis, with @Josh-Oand a van for scale.
    16 points
  9. I always thought the way the seed formed on one of my most favorite palms was interesting. It sure saves time when needing to clean. Reminds me of popcorn. Commonly known as the Madagascar Foxtail, and affectionately as the Mad Fox, I believe it is still a Dypsis after the latest name change - so Dypsis marojejyi for the palm purists here. Here's some pics of the seeds, some volunteers from a previous batch, and the palms themselves.
    16 points
  10. I call this one “The Beast”. Probably the best looking representative of the species. Found in the Mississippi neighborhood here in Portland. The tree originally came from the famed plantsman Sean Hogan. Apparently the owner is an elderly lady who does zero for this palm. I think it’s tapped into some sort of reliable water supply perhaps a leaky water or sewer pipe. Enjoy!
    15 points
  11. Well when I left for a brief trip to the States Fiona was not yet born. I had done the basics one does during peak hurricane months but nothing like what I would have done had I been home when she “visited”. Still since the rain, not the wind was the issue this time, my little plants in pots in a strong shadehouse are fine. I am choosing to post the positives at least to start. Look at these survivor palms that did not lose a leaf! Licuala cordata Asterogyne martiana Licuala mattanensis ‘mapu’ now seeding, but collected the ripe seed before I left. Chambeyronia macrocarpa In fact, when I looked more closely, most of the severely leaning palms are less than 4 feet tall and have evidence of obvious rhinoceros beetle damage. Of course they could not stand tall in the wind and rain. Some may live as I can prop them up and apply imidocloprid hopefully tomorrow. My flight home was to be on the day Fiona (and María five years ago) hit, so obviously I had to make other plans. I am very happy that even originally paying the lowest fares SW and Cape Air were VERY nice and got me home Tuesday by dark. Bad but not María on my land and in fact City water returned today versus 3 months without following María. Got smart with a small push button propane generator so no need to wait in gas lines. Bamboo and Tropical Almond and Cecropia trees are expected to crash down and I have been removing and cutting but still plenty to fall last Sunday. My big Roystonea borinquenas dropped leaves which crush some plants but the trunks usually survive and they push out odd yellow leaves soon after. Need to get through the rest of September and all of October before relaxing a little. I remember Irma that was so bad for us (and poor FL got nailed) but before we could clean up and exhale María charged in. I never lost internet (so credit cards work) and kept phone service with this one which has also been a huge plus. I live in the mountains away from water so my house and car are dry. Certainly many in PR had to be rescued due to flooding and landslides and many roads still impassable. Below is one of two seedling Copernicia fallaensis from Mike Harris of Caribbean palms in Loxahatchee FL. Both with Cuban genetics were also perfect and probably just appreciated all the extra water and now even more sun! Back to clean up/rescue.
    15 points
  12. The PSSC had a meeting yesterday and it was wonderful. Two gardens in Huntington Beach, Orange County, California. The first garden featured, among much else, what looked like a Dypsis madagascarenis that did double duty as a flag pole. Other palm talkers, jump on in and post away, too!
    15 points
  13. Hello ladies and gents, On September 27th, 2020 my third child was born. On that exact day I also planted a Bismarckia In my front yard. This was not planned at all, my wife was having some contractions throughout the previous night and some in the morning but nothing too serious. That morning I planned on doing some planting and followed through with the plans. Right after the Bismarckia was in, my wife told me it was time to go to the hospital (Barley even had time to take a picture and water the palm). Long story short, here we are 2 years later, God willing, and I decided that it’s only right to take a picture each year to see both of their growths. This Bismarckia is now my daughters palm. Sep, 2020 (Top Pic) Sep, 2021 (Middle Pic) Sep, 2022 (Bottom Pic)
    14 points
  14. View from the driveway. Note the Dypsis pembana multi trunk in the center.
    14 points
  15. If the roof starts to get dangerously close to the palm, just trim the roof back.
    14 points
  16. Here are some photos I took of palms around Hilo, Hawaii! Click Here for the IDs... plus more photos
    14 points
  17. So I visited Tresco's Abbey Gardens on Saturday and it was even more insane than you can possibly imagine. The Rhopalostylis crownshafts especially are out of this world. Starting with the main focal point, which is the monster Phoenix Canariensis AKA Canary Island date palms... Jubaea Chilensis... Butia Odorata... Washingtonia Robusta... Rhopalostylis Sapida is the most common palm on Tresco easily outnumbering anything else by 5 to 1. Possibly even 10 to 1. There are literally hundreds of them, including numerous volunteers that have sprouted all over the grounds. They seem to be thriving and setting seed profusely, with maybe 20-30 self-seeding specimens now. Tresco may have the best Rhopie stand/collection outside of NZ. Hundreds of volunteer Rhopies coming up all over the place... Archontophoenix Cunninghamiana... Juania or just another Rhopalostylis? I'm honestly not sure. It looks kind of Juania like and I know Tresco has a Juania, however they also have 200+ Rhopies now... Brahea Armata Sabal minor possibly? The Norfolk Island pines are insane. I saw many actually producing cones too since they self seed on Tresco now... Lots of flowers still in bloom, although the main flower season had pretty much ran its course by now... Love seeing the Golden Pheasants on Tresco... Please nobody quote this post when replying, since it will then duplicate it into the thread and it is a pretty lengthy post. Thanks.
    14 points
  18. Strolling through my urban neighborhood prompted me to stop a few times to enjoy the desert, forest and occasional jungle that I passed. What about your neighborhood? Anything prompt you to stop?
    13 points
  19. Phoenix rupicola was looking beautiful this morning
    13 points
  20. Forgot what this was - brain got overloaded….
    13 points
  21. These are from seeds I got from RPS. Seedlings overwinter in ground here no problem. This prevents me from having to mess with heat mats and keep more community pots inside this winter. Next spring/ summer plan to pot these up. Going to plant another bed in spring with all the seeds I harvest this year as well. Filled the bed with organic raised bed bagged soil. Topped with organic composted humus as a top cover/ mulch on top of the seeds. Watered the bed everyday and viola.
    12 points
  22. Was going for a bush walk and this caught my eye. Thought it might have been a double headed rhopalistylis sapida for a minute.
    12 points
  23. The mottled duo Pinanga aristata (top) and Licuala sp Kalimantan (bottom) caught my eyes today.
    12 points
  24. Moving right along…this Needle started out near a birdseed (squirrel) table…despite its protective needles, the critters nearly battered it to death, so I moved it to a nice, quiet spot under a big holly tree, though a very dry, shady spot, over the years, it has really responded…no protection at all except for the natural canopy of the holly tree and its south face…I highly recommend this palm for unprotected zone 7…over time, in a sunny spot, you can get a trunk as well…
    11 points
  25. Here are a few of my favourite shots of palms taken around Thailand during the past 3 years since I began collecting seeds, growing them...
    11 points
  26. Oneocarpus bataua. Just a baby and will grow into a large South American palm. I thought I had planted far enough away from the house, but now I’m beginning to wonder. Hmmmmm There is a yellow Sawzall at the base for scale. Tim
    11 points
  27. https://www.google.com/maps/@23.6996555,-80.3913269,3a,75y,99.31h,65.93t/data=!3m8!1e1!3m6!1sAF1QipPYp8lBb7FomfW8-cUc5q1zsEfX5fLVBXmWc--k!2e10!3e11!6shttps:%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com%2Fp%2FAF1QipPYp8lBb7FomfW8-cUc5q1zsEfX5fLVBXmWc--k%3Dw203-h100-k-no-pi-0-ya40.439095-ro-0-fo100!7i8192!8i4096
    11 points
  28. A few Here are a few pics from a private garden here in the Uk which I took last week. I thought some of the members here would be interested to see what's going on in the Uk Eps by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Left to right John Prescott with his wife, Charlie Pridham and his wife, Myself, Atif, Vic Silver, Daniel Petit, and Richard Booth A log narrow drive down to Daniels which is going to get tighter as the palms he has planted encroach a fab entrance Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Palm above is one of Daniels smaller Brahea edulis http://www.growingontheedge.net/images/smilies/icon_eek.gif Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Yucca rostata below Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Brahea armata which has been recently moved for the building work just completed on the house Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr How big is the Brahea you say well here is the current Mrs Spence as a measure Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Apologies if I get some i.d's wrong hopefully Dan will let me know Butia yatay x Jubaea chilensis below Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Just look at this super Butia bending away from what used to be a hedge Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Aeoniums and Butia Eriospatha x Syagrus in this border Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Phoenix canariensis below Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Brahea armata and Brahea edulis which was flowering below Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniels by Kevin Spence, on Flickr I think this was Butia x Parajubaea Coccoides it was a stand out palm Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr (Butia x Jubaea) x Syagrus below Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Parajubaea tvt in background Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Parajub tvt by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Chamaerops humilis and another B.yatay x Jubaea Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Trachycarpus princeps below Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr Daniel's by Kevin Spence, on Flickr A bit of a testing area for Parajubaea hybrids and Ceroxylon Parajub cerloxyn by Kevin Spence, on Flickr There were many many more exotic hybrids in amongst the palms and these are just a few shots that caught my eye. Many thanks to Daniel and Lisa for having us round to show us your great house complete with palmetum....loved the Key Lime Pie http://www.growingontheedge.net/images/smilies/icon_biggrin.gif Daniels by Kevin Spence, on Flickr us visited Abbotsbury gardens and moved on to Daniels place which is near Weymouth on our south coast. There were quite a few family's 7 kids in the pool at one point. on Flickr
    11 points
  29. So I've got hundreds of dollars of seeds that just haven't been germinating. This angers me. So I picked up this broken fridge from an auction for $2.50. Cut a hole I'm the top to allow light to enter. Covered the hole with transparent bubble wrap to trap heat and still allow light to penetrate inside. Then ran a Sonoff switch with a temperature sensor through the main hole and plugged a heating pad into it. The switch will turn the heat pad on at 92* and switch off when it hits 96* inside the box. Its crude, ugly and unsophisticated BUT... Its been running on autopilot for a few days now between 92 and 96 degrees and its already sprouted a single Brahea armata seed from a bag thats been sitting dormant for months on a shelf in the greenhouse. Nothing else has shown movement yet but its only been a few days. The single brahea is a ray of hope though that some of these other bags can start popping off soon. I'll keep this updated as they germinate.
    11 points
  30. Oraniopsis appendiculata. Slow growing Australian palm, but it is getting bigger. Tim
    10 points
  31. That spathe will abort as the first ones usually do on many palms. Like Darold wrote, two or three new fronds later and you should get a viable inflorescence. Here’s one of my Rhopalostylis’ spathes for reference.
    10 points
  32. I went looking for seeds today at a park near my house. Lots of cool palms out there - a few breahea species, some livistonas, a few jubaea and of course washingtonia and phoenix. Unfortunately, it looks like most of the seed goes to feed to local squirrel population, but I did manage to gather a few seeds below two livistona (decora, and an unknown species to me). The unknown livistona livistona decora These are the seeds I found below the unknown livistona But most of the seed have obviously been past the paws of the squirrels here Including the meaty coquitos from the jubaea 20220917_134805_02.mp4 Finally, one of a group of 4 jubaeas
    10 points
  33. There appear to be quite a few different forms of this species, such as 'kuhlii' and the 'sun hardy' form...these ones are growing in full sun in Brisbane, an ideal palm for the garden... Looking pretty good for the start of spring down here!
    10 points
  34. I just noticed today my Brahea Dulcis Blue is getting more blue!
    10 points
  35. Couple of leaf sheaths fell off yesterday…..these two D. carlsmithii are really taking off. There is a red handled lopper at the base of the right one for scale. I’ve not kept up with the reordering of Madagascar palm taxonomy, so there you go. Tim
    10 points
  36. A few years ago, I was enjoying the best bowl of gumbo I'd ever had, sitting in the dining room of a friend's house in Mobile. The house was in the historic neighborhood (S. Georgia Street) and they're spaced pretty close together, so I thought it was clever of him to allow the volunteer palm (I think it was probably a Sabal palmetto) growing at the foundation to fill the dining room window and provide privacy, with no thought to curtains, shades or blinds. The fronds lightly brushed the window screen; a real tropical atmosphere. The idea stuck with me and I've tried to replicate it here at my house with a Livistona chinensis. For a couple of weeks until today, this window was out getting restored (mine is an oldish house, too - 1919) and a sheet of plywood filled the window. It was nice to see the Livistona had put on a little size and was beginning to do its job. The houses are farther apart here, but the palm can block the view of my neighbor's A/C units and paraphernalia in their driveway. It will also screen the live oak, which was damaged in 2020's Hurricane Sally. (Still not done with the restoration, as you can see from the old awning and missing hardware, but I'm getting there.)
    10 points
  37. Here's a pic that shows the palm a bit better. 15 feet tall and 8 new fronds this year
    10 points
  38. These Archontophoenix roots in the photos wereexposed when I began to demo my pool/pond. They grew between the concrete and fiberglass and to a depth of six feet and well past 30’ from the two palms pictured. The roots are harmless on nearly any palm however. Those roots are coming from the two palms up by the house.
    10 points
  39. I challenged myself to see as many palms and exotics as possible in central London on Thursday, including ones that I haven’t posted before. I’ll start off with the less impressive ones. I have posted about these CIDP’s previously. They are self seeding aggressively with hundreds of seedlings coming up, some of which are on strap leafs. All of these are my photos from Thursday. Here are yet more London Washingtonia that haven’t even been posted before on here. All backyard lurkers that have been growing there for years. I also stopped by at Egerton Terrace to see the exotics too Brahea Clara in Notting Hill Brahea Armata and CIDP in Notting Hill Washingtonia in St James square Mount Street Gardens CIDP Eaton Square CIDP’s Norfolk Island Pine in Fulham Phoenix Canariensis in Wapping Another church CIDP located at St Michaels Heres one of the Bougainvillea’s that I actually walked past by mistake. Big bananas in Fulham Reporton Road CIDP Chamaerops Humilis Here’s the weird shade grown Phoenix hybrid in Lincoln Inn Fields @gurugu @Phoenikakias Little Venice Washingtonia Jubaea and Cycas Revoluta in Belgravia Lemon citrus? I wasn’t looking for Yucca Elephantipes, but since it does so well in London I obviously came across quite a few… I haven’t even commented on the parakeets yet, which was the best part of the trip. That is an entire post in itself.
    9 points
  40. Licuala khoonmengii A cool little palm that keeps flowering, but no seed.
    9 points
  41. I have been wondering for a while when these might start flowering and producing seeds and I found a nice surprise today after removing a dying frond. I grew these from see planted in April of 2011. I believe these are R. bauri.
    9 points
  42. Beast in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco (September 2022)
    9 points
  43. The first is a Fourtuni. The nicest one I've ever raised. It's 3 years old I think. Next is waggie x Princeps. 3rd Vancouver Waggie. Last is Nanus x Waggie. I have 7 or 8 of these. They are slow growing.
    9 points
  44. I just noticed that my clump of an unknown species of Puya that has been growing for 12 years in the ground is finally pushing up an inflorescence, so flowers will be coming! The first photo shows the paler Puya above a Puya alpestris clump that I had growing in the same area back in 2013. I have since removed the Puya alpestris and what remains of that is in a couple of pots. The unknown Puya is both lighter in color, forms much larger rosettes and each individual leaf is much thicker and longer than with Puya alpestris. So with the flowers to open in the coming weeks, I will hopefully be able to nail down the species as well. The inflorescence pushing up is visible in the second photo below. It began as an extended protruberance of leaves, with the leaves diminishing in size (both length and width) as it approaches the current apex of the inflorescence. Given my experience with the height of Puya alpestris and Puya mirabilis, I expect this one will continue growing up for a while before it actually opens and I see any flowers. While this clump is large and has many individual "plants", I only see this one inflorescence thus far. I know that some of the other Puya bloomed nearby at Quail Botanical, now San Diego Botanic Garden, here in Encintias during the Spring/ early summer. My Puya mirabilis was later to bloom waiting until late July every year. More photos to come as we get something more visually interesting to show.
    9 points
  45. My Brahea Moorei with twelve flower stalks. Loves being kept moist, it came in same seed batch as Glenn’s growing in Modesto, CA, origin was Cistus Nursery, Portland, Oregon. It is very happy in filtered light. Perry (SLO Palms) has small plants from my Big Boy, not sure if he is selling these yet. Seed is for sale, get in touch with me
    9 points
  46. I have many plants on my terrace, but cannot plant them in the garden as there is no real shaded place
    9 points
  47. I was in a friends garden and this took my breath away. Holly beefy goodness
    9 points
  48. Chyrsalidocarpus onilahensis, or to abbreviate, C. onilahensis. The capital C will be my go-to! I wonder about those labeled "species 1, species 4, etc" in the article. Which one might possibly be what we (again) call 'orange crush'? I'm certain it's in the C. category. The 4 in this photo aren't looking orange at the time of the photo, but when a frond drops, the orange pops.
    9 points
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