Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Chester B

    Chester B

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      275

    • Posts

      3,429


  2. happypalms

    happypalms

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      248

    • Posts

      1,639


  3. DoomsDave

    DoomsDave

    IPS MEMBER


    • Points

      180

    • Posts

      33,544


  4. Jim in Los Altos

    Jim in Los Altos

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      172

    • Posts

      4,782


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/01/2024 in all areas

  1. I’m wondering when this leaf will be green. It emerged in mid November and here we are the second week of February and it’s still red! Getting close to three months! This is a young C. macrocarpa. Nov. 18 Nov. 27 Dec. 22 Dec. 28 Jan. 8 Jan. 18 Jan. 30 Feb. 8 Starting to show some green.
    29 points
  2. I've been hit or miss here most of this past miserable fall and winter. While our ultimate low was a relatively mild 44.8F here in Cape Coral we've had a record 84+ sunless days, drizzle/downpours and highs that often barely rose past 60F. Not our typical sunny, dry, warm/cool winter days. We've had more rain this winter than all of last summer. I've been unable to work in the soggy yard for weeks at a time. Our gardens are a mess. But in the last week or so the sun has made a miracle return and brought days in the 70s to 80F. This past Saturday I went to the biggest garden festival in the area at the Edison-Ford Estate in downtown Ft. Myers. I ended up with three small palms and they are dandies. Today I took my first photos in months and present them here. Happy belated New Year to all palm lovers. May your palm burst into growth. 1. Ptychosperma caryotoides - one of my favorite Ptychos and while supposedly common is hard to find around here. 2. Ravenea hillebrandii - I keep trying to grow this little gem. Hoping for success at last 3. Areca catechu Dwarf - I lost one of my small, planted specimens last fall. Hurricane Ian plus summer drought plus chilly, dreary fall/winter may have been too much. Its companion Dwarf is till on live support. I hope it survives. So on Saturday when I saw almost no petioles on this Dwarf I couldn't resist.
    23 points
  3. Got an opportunity to stop by Jim's garden over the weekend. I enjoyed taking some of these photos, despite the difficult lighting conditions (bright highlights, dark shadows). Did a little post processing work to bring these photos to life. Hope you like them. Click the link to view the album. https://photos.app.goo.gl/GneVpq1VwwjRpdYr8
    22 points
  4. New Year, New Palms! All of us at Floribunda Palms extend warm wishes for a happy and healthy New Year to all! We are eager to embark on an exceptional year for palm enthusiasts everywhere in 2024. We are proud and thrilled to unveil a selection of extraordinary palm species for this February 2024 update, just under 100 new palms to choose from! First up, bring the elegance of the rare Heterospathe califrons into your garden with seedlings priced at $15.00, a stunning palm with leathery, bifid leaves. Suchin Marcus for scale Another bifid stunner, the unique blackish Geonoma conduruensis (also only $15), is an essential addition for those looking for a beautiful understory talking point. You can also add Asterogyne guianensis to your collection, continuing our theme of bifid beauties with wide unsplit leaflets, available for $12. The small Chamadorea frondosa, with its distinctive bluish-green foliage, is offered at $12 but in limited quantities. For connoisseurs, the legendary Sabinaria magnifica, possibly one of the most ornamental palms globally, is available once again as single open leaf seedlings, shipped in a pot for $70. Also, don't miss out on the Hydriastele sp. 'metallic' (flabellata), priced at $15, featuring metallic leaves reminiscent of the H. pinangoides type. Click Here to go to the pricelist, or copy/paste the address below into your browser: https://floribunda.xyz/pricelist
    21 points
  5. I’ve got a bunch in my yard. Like 25, most over 30 feet. How about the rest of you? I’ve seen many encouraging posts about growing them in the desert, and Northern California. How about the Inland Empire? Or other places? Tell us and show us if you can, or ask questions!
    20 points
  6. Gathered up a quick hunard nutz
    19 points
  7. I got these beautiful 3 gallon needle palms delivered today. Just because I'm in zone 9B doesn't mean I don't appreciate these palms. Big needles can add that real jungle effect to any garden and I have some wet spots so these should love it. The bonus is they'll be a care free palm any time some cold weather comes my way. These came from Mail Order Natives out of Florida. They were very reasonably priced and shipping was quite affordable considering the weight of the two packages. It looks like they can get 4 per package so it might've been cheaper if I did it that way. Definitely recommend them as I have purchased from them in the past. They have saved me years of growing these out from seed. Can't wait to get them in the ground.
    19 points
  8. These are fairly carefree in this area of the SF Bay Area. Just need to keep them well irrigated in the summer. Two of my twelve are in full sun and occasionally suffer some leaf burn but grow well otherwise. Partial to full shade works best here.
    19 points
  9. Socratea exorrhiza, emergent stilt root. Tim
    19 points
  10. If you love lemur palms leave a comment. A few years ago I decided to line my driveway with Lemurophoenix halleuxii palms. They were $45/1g at the time which was a lot back then but by today's standards that was a great deal. Now that I am beginning to see the fruits of my labor I regret not planting even more of them. What a spectacular palm. They were slow because the soil by the driveway is horrid, but they've finally found what they need and they're really speeding up. Location Lemuria, hem I mean Hawaii, Mauna Kea, same elevation as habitat in Madagascar but way colder than Madagascar. They're sailing right through our rather dry El Nino that is making the lawn look like a Dallas garden. Anyway I am just trying to gloat so please forgive me.
    17 points
  11. Clinostigma savoryanum, always looks great. Tim
    17 points
  12. Saw this coming home this evening, while sitting at the red light I look up and see this.
    16 points
  13. A pic of a neighbor’s lipstick palms, and pics of my little yard, including the lipstick palm that’s finally starting to take off after barely growing for 3 years, and our neighborhood beach with a chunk of tree in the water from December’s massive floods. We’re in Kewarra Beach, which is just north of Cairns
    15 points
  14. Sorry if I did this incorrectly this is my first time using this website last weekend I was at the Edison And Ford Winter Estates in fort myers Florida and picked up some unique palms any comments will be appreciated! Now to the palms I got and what I payed for them. Starting with The first one to the right Ptychosperma elegans $25 Roystonea Regia $20 Satakenita liukiuemsis $35 Strelitzia reginae $15 Bentinckia nicobarica $15
    15 points
  15. Chrysalidocarpus Hovomantsina Hybrid, bright white crown shaft after a leaf drop
    15 points
  16. I’ve got 2 in the ground and a couple more in the line up to plant out later.
    15 points
  17. I thought it survived if I mber correctly. Mine is in absolute beast mode right now. Mine did well in a pot but grew out of pot sizes pretty quick. T J
    14 points
  18. Last plantings of the day were these three Chrysalidocarpus Nauseosus (I think that’s the name now, was Dypsis Nauseosa) lining part of the driveway. The house is now framed and trusses were put up this past week so I’m now working on planting the driveway. I was holding off til after the truss and large lumber deliveries had to be brought down the driveway. slightly different angle showing 4 recently planted Iriartea Deltoidea that are also a bit sun and wind damaged but should get through it. thanks for looking, more soon!
    14 points
  19. I was stunned at how fast these guys were able to trench through all those roots. Basically two days they had trenched for both walls. We opted to use Keystone blocks, as less of a “footing“ would be required. Had we concrete walls, code would’ve dictated just a huge amount of excavation. We just didn’t have the space for it unless we wanted to lose a bunch of mature palms.
    13 points
  20. Not the best pic, but here’s my watermelon Chambeyronia Macro. There’s a pretty hacked up B. Alfredii next to it, that was probably planted a year or two later. They were both one gallons, when I planted them. The C. macro is probably 10-11 years old. The Copernicia macroglossa was planted in 2016 as a 3 gal.
    13 points
  21. Sabal palmetto 'Lisa' named after the discoverer's wife. First discovered in SWFL. Seeds should ripen ca. November. I got as high as 68% Lisa mutant. Rare, hard to find and highly desired. My avatar is a Sabal Lisa that used to grow by an I75 exit. It was rescued ahead of road construction and now resides with its sibling in a downtown Ft. Myers palm park.
    13 points
  22. This solitary lutescens-type palm always catches my eye
    13 points
  23. Santa Paula , California , Ventura County. Brought home from a trip to Maui. I got certs so it is legal. Very small when planted in about 2000. Shade in early morning , sun most of the afternoon. We rarely see below 38f. I’ve never had trouble with this palm , just leaf burning a little bit in the summer.
    13 points
  24. They can wind burn in an actual freeze , so choose your location based on that . I have one that is about 16' tall here in the Daytona Beach area . It has been somewhat wind burnt 2-3 times , but otherwise no problem . It has multitudes of seeds each year . Here it is , about 2- 1/2 years ago .
    13 points
  25. Caryota ophiopellis getting snakey
    13 points
  26. Any others in the bay area? 5gal bucket for scale:
    13 points
  27. Another great looking palm highly sought after by collectors the watermelon 🍉
    12 points
  28. ……Having trouble loading the picture. Here it is. -dale
    12 points
  29. 12 points
  30. Hate to revive an old thread but here's an update on mine
    12 points
  31. I thought this would make a nice Palmy ServiceTM thread! For those just embarking on Palmy Reproductive Adventures….. Here’s Arenga engleri
    11 points
  32. 11 points
  33. Galveston today high of 49° with 34MPH winds ideal conditions for pictures:))))))giant Bop honestly impressed the beloved queens still going strong Queen and pigmy dates right on Galveston bay largest brahea armata ? In Texas
    11 points
  34. A rather nice, dainty little palm from Fiji. Slender with an open crown, interesting leaflets and fruit. A bit on the slow side which gives more time to enjoy. Some shade, lots of moisture and humidity. Tim
    11 points
  35. I planted mine about 8 years ago. Seminole Florida . Full sun most of day. Lowest temperature this winter was 35F for one night. Minor leaf burn in summer. It gets irrigation regularly. Cow manure as fertilizer. First year of inflorescence. Hopefully I get viable seeds to plant more. People walking their dogs stop to admire its beauty. Two years ago a pool company stopped by and asked if they could buy it from me. I told him no thanks.
    11 points
  36. This Cryosophila stauracantha attracted attention during a break in the rain. It has been slow growing so while not an ankle biter by nature, is filling that role for now.
    11 points
  37. Today (Feb. 3) saw some new plantings. The middle curve of the terrace got this Chrysalidocarpus Leptocheillos hybrid: Small Hyophorbe Verschafeltii on each side of the Leotocheillos hybrid: Leptocheillos hybrid side angle with Prestonianus further down:
    11 points
  38. While staying with a family in the punjab living the daily life a street vendor literally pedaling his plants around the the streets selling his home grown plants calling out in the streets garden plants for sale as he rode around I just had to get a photo he was making a living and doing something he loved to do only in India anything goes
    10 points
  39. These guys are super creative as well about how to get soil out of there as efficiently as possible. They made dirt slides on the fly, emptying into wheelbarrels, which they were then wheelbarrow down the hill, where they had removed railroad ties. Then onto ramps, which they made, and out into the front yard for disposal.
    10 points
  40. Since before the year 2000 there has been a creek near an old homestead at Concepcion Tamaulipas, north of Aldama on the coastal roads towards Soto la Marina at the 23rd parallel where royals (presumably Roystonea regia) have been naturalizing. The area is rockier than most parts of coastal Tamaulipas and the presence of Quercus oleoides suggests the soil here is slightly acidic. Originally the old homestead had a long avenue leading up to it which was lined by royals on both sides of the entry, about half being dead in the early to mid 1990s, presumably from the 1989 freeze, when temperatures in the area dropped to near 20F on Dec 24. The only visible marker to indicate the location of the old homestead is a large eucalyptus tree which used to be in the yard. This is a picture from 2001, when there were just a couple of palms that appeared to be wild. An occasional Acrocomia mexicana could be found in the area. Over the years the royals started becoming more abundant around the creek, where a few Acrocomia mexicana also started showing up. My last time to pass by the place before this January was in 2009 and by then the royals were thriving and reproducing, but nothing like to the extent that is seen today. Aside from just spreading around the creek by 2024 they had also started popping up in open fields Seeding is not a problem. If you look closely at Google Earth you can see how far they have spread. Concepcion is the approximate location of the original house and the “X” is the spot where the naturalizing royals were first noticed. The dashed line indicates how far up and down the creek they appear to have spread given the presence of pinnate palms observable in Google Earth (though some could be Acrocomia). The creek flows left to right as it heads towards the Gulf of Mexico. Presumably the royals will keep naturalizing down the creek. How far they will eventually go is unknown, the area is fairly wet and the creek eventually merges with others and comes out at Barra Del Tordo, near the northern limit of the truly tropical zone of coastal Tamaulipas. Their progress westward does not appear to have moved very far.
    10 points
  41. I have 7 all juveniles in my yard. I have a mix of 4 Macrocarpa and 3 Hookeri. I also planted a trio with Macrocarpa and Hookeri with a Clinostigma Savoryanum all in a planted getting some shade from a larger Howea double.
    10 points
  42. Its up. I gave it a good soak after it got in the ground.
    10 points
  43. This Sabal 'Oregon Hybrid' came today. My first hardy palm. The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step!
    10 points
×
×
  • Create New...