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  1. Sorry if I did this incorrectly this is my first time using this website last weekend I was at the Edison And Ford Winter Estates in fort myers Florida and picked up some unique palms any comments will be appreciated! Now to the palms I got and what I payed for them. Starting with The first one to the right Ptychosperma elegans $25 Roystonea Regia $20 Satakenita liukiuemsis $35 Strelitzia reginae $15 Bentinckia nicobarica $15
    15 points
  2. Chrysalidocarpus Hovomantsina Hybrid, bright white crown shaft after a leaf drop
    15 points
  3. I was stunned at how fast these guys were able to trench through all those roots. Basically two days they had trenched for both walls. We opted to use Keystone blocks, as less of a “footing“ would be required. Had we concrete walls, code would’ve dictated just a huge amount of excavation. We just didn’t have the space for it unless we wanted to lose a bunch of mature palms.
    13 points
  4. Not the best pic, but here’s my watermelon Chambeyronia Macro. There’s a pretty hacked up B. Alfredii next to it, that was probably planted a year or two later. They were both one gallons, when I planted them. The C. macro is probably 10-11 years old. The Copernicia macroglossa was planted in 2016 as a 3 gal.
    13 points
  5. The crownshaft of my oldest Chrysalidocarpus decipiens is fattening up on one side. Does anyone have knowledge as to when these typically produce their first inflorescence or how much trunk they usually have at the time? Here’s the “expectant” palm below. (size 11 shoe for reference)
    10 points
  6. My new favorite non-palm is Euphorbia x pasteurii. It does kinda look like a whole bunch of miniature palm trees if you keep it trimmed up. What really sold me was the way it sailed through three nights of 14F and three days that never got out of the twenties. Heres a pic of mine from after the freeze, pushing out new leaves already. Here's some pics I stole of the internet, but most of the ones I found don't do them justice.
    10 points
  7. Galveston today high of 49° with 34MPH winds ideal conditions for pictures:))))))giant Bop honestly impressed the beloved queens still going strong Queen and pigmy dates right on Galveston bay largest brahea armata ? In Texas
    10 points
  8. These guys are super creative as well about how to get soil out of there as efficiently as possible. They made dirt slides on the fly, emptying into wheelbarrels, which they were then wheelbarrow down the hill, where they had removed railroad ties. Then onto ramps, which they made, and out into the front yard for disposal.
    10 points
  9. Peaches anyone? Bactris gasipaes fruiting again. One mean palm.
    9 points
  10. I will start first I have this robelini brought if from lowes and planted it in 1998 it really sky rocketed after that now it has slowed down but I have never seen one as big as mine!
    8 points
  11. Chambeyronia oliviformis opening up a new frond with a nice bluish hue.
    8 points
  12. Jason, must be C. hovo time. Mine recently dropped a frond as well, so beautiful. Man you did get a head start and a healthy one at that, already a monster. I planted the one in the garden back in 2012 as a 1 gal., but it’s really speeding up. Thanks for the posts. Tim
    8 points
  13. Putting in a foot of crushed aggregate for the base. 3 yards hauled up the hill in buckets. Compacted, leveled and “stepped “ where needed, as the yard also slopes right to left.
    8 points
  14. Quick update.. 2/16/24 No protection this winter.
    8 points
  15. Here’s my largest of 4. It’s been in the ground 3 years from a 15 gallon and getting very thick. I’ve seen photos of another Hookeri that was extremely robust that came from the same seller. The trunk is much fatter than my other Hookeri, don’t know if its the copious water this guy gets or good genes.
    8 points
  16. 7 points
  17. Still a ways to go but progress continues. Any great rabbit solutions? They have doing a number on certain plants.
    7 points
  18. My previous post showed a Hovomantsina hybrid. My true Hovomantsina caught my eye this weekend when a leaf fell and revealed its first flower. Planted 6 years ago from a 15 gallon pot. This is in my Hilo garden at 500 feet elevation.
    7 points
  19. This past week we finally had some springlike weather - today we are back to clouds, rain and January temps for the next 7-10 days. The past 18 months have taken a brutal toll on our gardens: Hurricane Ian in 2022, drought in summer 2023, then non-stop clouds, more rain than last summer and protracted low temps in 2024. We've had a record 84+ days of clouds and no sun. I spent much of last fall living at Airbnbs in Tampa while my husband was treated at Moffitt Cancer Center. My container gardens were on their own. In early October I moved many of my potted tropical palms onto the back lanai where they had access to irrigation and shade cloth. I haven't done much to/for them for the past 4-1/2 months because the weather has been so bad, also I am a 24/7 caregiver and responsible for overseeing the house and yard. So, the lanai looked appropriately shabby. I'm no longer used to spending long, dreary days cooped up inside the house performing chores, i.e., cleaning, washing, cooking etc. and the experience made me a bit wonky. So, when the weather warmed up last week I decided to tackle the neglected back lanai and its container garden for as many hours as I had energy. I decided to take before/after photos. Spring is out there somewhere. Time for spring cleanup. Back Lanai Spring Cleanup "Before" Photos - First I had to untangle the mess of pots shoved into the SE corner of the lanai. Then remove all the dead palms - I was blessed with about a dozen casualties, far fewer than I expected. I moved the empty shade houses and placed pots on a work table for weeding, picked up the shelf units and rolling carts. Finally, I swept the floor: over and over and over. Back Lanai Spring Cleanup "After" Photos I trimmed the palms and watered them as needed. I will apply fertilizer in March. Finally, I replaced them onto shelf units or into a shade house. I made sure no pots were left sitting on the floor as rain was due to begin overnight. When spring returns I will tackle the container gardens in the back and side yards. Final photo: Chamaedorea brachypoda. It is considered invasive in FL so I keep these in pots. I'd like to part with some of them but they are too tall to mail. Pickup in Cape Coral only
    7 points
  20. Huge queens, Pygmy dates, Washies, Bottle palms! And Bismarckia at the Kingwood Lowes here in the Houston area. Only one Bismarckia left as the bluest one is coming with me!
    7 points
  21. This is the middle wall that had rocks supporting the soil on the high side.
    7 points
  22. Sorry for the delay, here are the requested photos of Pinanga Declinata. I wish I had more and I wish I planted in a better location and not hidden behind other palms.
    7 points
  23. I have a total of four in ground, all are doing well. Here’s my biggest hookeri with deep color just a few weeks ago. My yard is in a cold pocket south of Wekiwa Springs, Fl zone 9b. Survived 27 degrees two winters ago.
    7 points
  24. I have several small ones in my yard - and a batch of watermelon seedlings that will go in the ground this spring. I get 2 leaves a year on these. Took these photos yesterday Lots of chamaedorea in this area, along with heliconia scheidiana and some howea. You can probably spot the larger of the chambeyronia, the smaller ones might blend in too much.
    7 points
  25. I only have one and it is really small. I think it has been in the ground a couple of years planted as a really small palm just barely showing pinnate leaves. It took a while to start putting out red fronds and I thought it was a dud but it puts out some color now. The red lasts a lot longer in the cool months than in the summer. Leaves still burn really easily in the sun. I hope it grows out of that trait as it ages. This picture is from early January this year.
    7 points
  26. Someone else posted a topic similar recently I couldn’t find it or I would have just posted there. Anyway bought this a a palmetto a few years back and planted it, definitely not a palmetto, pretty sure it’s just a minor. The leaves started looking crappy and stopped growing…noticed a random fan leaf poking out of the ground away from where this was planted. I already decided I was going to dig it up. Here it is, weirdest Sabal activity I’ve seen in personThat’s the position it was growing in the ground That massive Sabal “egg” the size of a softball but hard as a rockPotted it in this big 25 gallon pot, seems super healthy below the soil line, we’ll see what it does. I’ll update this later in the summer.
    6 points
  27. I understand the hate for Queens but damn y’all completely dodged the man’s question entirely. He already stated that he doesn’t really like queens he was just asking what he can do to help this one in particular. I myself am not sure why it would be doing that. The way the emerging fronds look to me, I’ve always associated that with being cut. How that could happen? Honestly I have no clue. My question to you @Palmtreedude69 is did you find a spear on the ground somewhere around the tree recently? It appears to me that it’s growing it just either got cut or it had some sort of infection in the crown for whatever reason, and said infection got pushed out and the result is the fronds having a cut appearance.
    6 points
  28. Anyone growing these? The late night eBay impulse forced me to purchase this. It's a minor from a similar latitude as mcurtain, Cherokee and warren so should hold good cold resistance. But the real draw is it's supposedly very blue. The problem is that there isn't much info or pictures available. I've received the seeds,they look like sabals,so let's see if they turn into nice blue palms. I paid at least double what I should for minor seeds, but if the seeds are legit it's worth it. I pmd @Bigfish he confirmed that they exist and were indeed very blue. Just wanted to make sure I wasn't chasing a Sabal "Fargo" or some other made up plant . Only pics I have are from the listing, hopefully these are winners🤞
    6 points
  29. That palm in Kris' photo is definitely C.titan....there are many growing in Australia....unlike the true C.bejofo...that seems to be the rarer one here. Here is my old one, recovering from severe hail damage a few years ago...moved it three times, but unfortunately it didn't survive the last one... 😞 That lower, shredded leaf is about 6ft for scale...these things get moving once established! Full sun is a must. Good that it finally has a name...It would be great to solve the Dark Mealy Bug Dypstery though!
    6 points
  30. Good Morning, Emerging Copernicia hospita is looking forward to another sunny day. Lars
    6 points
  31. @knikfar I am a member of that group, and someone added me to the "SE palms wholesale" chat. Turns out no one on there was a wholesaler from what I gather, it looks like Dave Alvarez might have been involved in the making of it from what I gathered from the way the conversation went. I would like to get down to Georgia some day as he has Jub x Butia (or vise versa, can't remember) and a couple rare Trachy species for sale. @ZPalms thanks. Nice weather today. This is not the right time of year to be planting palms here. But I'm impatient. View from the kitchen sink window is improving.
    6 points
  32. Dale, It was a small single in a 5 gallon container. It was several years later that it split into two and then eventually into three. I wanted a single and a few years ago I cut down the two small we ones thinking it would speed growth of the main stem. Instead, the main stem stopped growing until the two smaller offshoots were restored. I’ll never do that again! Better to let this palm grow as nature intended.
    6 points
  33. Impressive avocado tree growing on the east end of Galveston Island (Zone 10A) Looks flawless after the 23° event last month!
    6 points
  34. I have an extra one that I'll give to you but, for some reason, its looking quite pitiful right now. I hope it pulls through... Alternatively, I'll ask at JFGarden next time I am around. I also have a friend nearby who has a pretty large one. See pic (this was taken right after 11F):
    6 points
  35. When I lived in Natchez, Mississippi, I ordered a group of needles, just as you have, from Mail Order Natives. I planted them in a row alongside our driveway, under a row of sheltering Prunus caroliniana (cherry-laurel or laurel cherry). This was a perfect environment for them, and they actually grew quite steadily and much more quickly than I had anticipated. The lessons I learned about this species: they look 1000% better in rather dense shade; and they should NEVER be pruned (as many do) into some sort of "trunked" palm a la Chamaerops humilis. This will absolutely destroy the beauty of this palm. Their foliage must be allowed to drape completely to the ground...one must treat it more or less like Rhapis excelsa (a very close relative, by the way), and give it room. These are basically 6' x 6' palms and will attain that size within a few years from these bagged specimens you just purchased. If you're making a fence-row/hedge with yours, I would advise you plant them about 5' o.c. and make sure you have three feet of space on either side so they can attain their full 6' of width without you feeling the need to "shear them up" in case you can't walk around them any longer. They also grew very well in the rich Mississippi soil (it is a Loess soil in Natchez, but also has a lot of rich humus). In their natural habitat from central Mississippi eastward, they grow on humus atop limestone. From my experience, the limestone is definitely not a requirement, but they LOVE that rich humus and lots of that wonderful warm southern rain and humidity. I am trying to incorporate some of these out here in my landscape in the Palm Springs area, because I actually miss them...unfortunately Mail Order Natives will not ship to California...and I am wary of buying from others because this palm has some variabilities in leaflet-width, etc., depending on the mother populations. I feel that the form sold by Mail Order Natives is probably the most "lush" I have ever encountered. Their form has nice wide leaflets, quite deep green and glossy. I hope you enjoy them as much as I enjoyed mine!
    6 points
  36. Officially got my first two palms in the ground in. Texas. It’s a huge yard so it’s baby steps at this point. Two down and like 100 to go.
    6 points
  37. Boy, living in San Diego in the 90’s and early 2000’s and had known this palm was available, I would have had a yard full of them. Oh well, I had a chance to make up for it and plant five here in Hilo. Here’s a C. hookeri, missed the red leaf this go around. Tim
    6 points
  38. I've been thinking a lot this week. Of course, nothing is flowering yet much less producing seeds. But if you are interested I may be able to provide you more Sabal candidates for your Sanctuary later this year. I have a number of what I call Sabal minor Uber Dwarfs a few which have set seeds in the past. I would really like to preserve the genetics of these cool little palms in perpetuity. The past few months have driven home to me how fleeting our lives are when we are older or even if we are not. If my husband and I were to pass away sooner than later I have to ponder what will happen to our 0.61 ac of tropical paradise. Our two sons don't appreciate what their nutcase of a mother has done to our property (I mean, "Palms? Really??"). Our eldest expounds on living sparse, eschewing "stuff" (a noble idea itself) and spending their time on the "experience" of travel. So I strongly suspect they will bulldoze the gardens, then subdivide the land to sell at a tidy profit. Much of our container garden may be salvageable but I fear the large trunking palms will be goners. I tell them they had a good run (yeah, I'm a nutcase). So your offer of providing safe haven for Sabals that are or will be endangered in the wild appeals to me. I went outdoors to take photos of some - not all - of my Sabals that have seeding potential this year. Years ago I never would have imagined that anyone would even spit on Sabals much less ensure their posterity. Good work. Here are the candidates for future preservation. 1. Sabal miamiensis: I received 1 seedling in a cone from seeds collected by Christian Faulkner ca. 2007 Fantastic story about how developers destroyed the palm's wild habitat, leaving only a few specimens in botanical or personal gardens. I was glad to get one on my property. praying hands leaf 2. Sabal minor 'Blountstown Dwarf': a tiny miniature (2' tall x 3' wide) from near the Panhandle of FL. Comes true from seeds. The last photo is of my original mother palm I got from PDN circa 2010. It's stayed that size for 10+ years. 3. Sabal minor 'Italian Dwarf' (nee etonia) from seeds sent from Italy ca. 2009: Years ago a kind PTer from Italy sent me seeds of what he said was Sabal etonia so I could grow all FL native palms in my yard. This is it 15 years later. It flowers and puts out small crops of seeds (fewer than 100). Years later I queried PT on what they thought this odd little palm might be. Consensus was it is a Sabal minor. Other than Italy I have no idea where this palm originated. And my Italian benefactor has long since disappeared into the mists of time and cyberspace. It is a happy, trouble free little Sabal. 4. Sabal miamiensis x mexicana(?) hybrid Leu Garden from a seed collected in 2015: This spectacular fast growing palm should be widely grown. I've seen no other Sabal like it. A PTer who works at Leu speculated it might be a hybrid with a nearby Sabal mexicana. See below: a. It has the largest seeds of any Sabal I've ever seen, much bigger than those of my pure miamiensis specimen. b. It flowers weeks, i.e., April, before any other Sabal I've seen. c. Its seeds ripen in Aug/Sep. All my other Sabal seeds ripen late Oct. through Nov. d. It grew from a seed collected June 2015 to what you see in its latest photo and has seeded for the past several years. 5. Sabal minor 'Wakulla Dwarf': This Uber Dwarf palm originates about 70 miles SW from Blountstown down in the Big Bend area. It is approximately the same size but I find differences in their growth. Wakulla Dwarf is much less robust than Blountstown. Seed germination rate is lower and seedlings prone to die. While I have close to a dozen Blountstown offspring from my original mother palm, I have only two specimens remaining from original 3 from PDN and neither has produced surviving progeny. 6. Sabal minor 'Emerald Isle Giant': On sunny dry days this palm appears matte green. But on rainy, cloudy or foggy day it glows ghostly blue 7. Sabal minor 'Chipola Dwarf': another uber dwarf slightly larger than Blountstown & Wakulla dwarfs
    6 points
  39. This solitary lutescens-type palm always catches my eye
    6 points
  40. If you can find some of the Chamaerops Volcano, they stay pretty small and are hardier than the standard Chamaerops. They're supposed to be fully hardy here in Raleigh so it would definitely be hardy for you.
    5 points
  41. These two hookeri were like yours until they went pinnate and then became orange/red at that point. You can see they’re young in this photo. I think yours will send up redder fronds each time now.
    5 points
  42. Hi, boot came off from this seed grown D. album var. aureum... ...and... Second flowering attempt - but this time it looks promising. Lars
    5 points
  43. @Sabal King Oh I've thought that since they released it. It flowers like a minor. Definitely not blackburniana. @Sabal King That's interesting to read. Also suspected this. It has that classic "brightening" where the hastula meets the petiole of bermudana. The "blackburniana" I got from Phil is in the landscape and is what got damaged severely in Dec 22'. This year it has 20-40% leaf burn. The blackburniana I got from Chance I grew from seed and it has mild spotting on the leaves, but otherwise fine. No spear pull and still good color. I need to up-pot several this spring into more appropriate containers. I acquired all of these sabal seeds to germinate, and grow out to eventually plant at a more permanent property. For now, they remain in containers. I'll get some images of the little Uresana's as soon as possible. They aren't much to look at still only being a year old. But tough little buggers!
    5 points
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