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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/07/2024 in all areas

  1. The flower on this pinanga speciosa
    18 points
  2. Aa recent post by Tracy and a response by Dale concerning Chrysalidocarpus pilulifer, jogged my memory about the recent naming of C. paucifolius, aka ‘Orange Crush.’ The old name is so catchy, the correct one doesn’t roll off the tongue quire as easy. Anyway, here are a couple of specimens that are showing that trademark orange crown shaft. The small one is growing in almost solid rock, the larger one with a fair amount of soil. They are the same age. Tim
    16 points
  3. Today this Licuala spinosa caught my eye. I never imagined it would get this big.
    13 points
  4. Here is the current progress. Left to right, Sabal uresana, needle palm, Livistona nitida, Brahea decumbens, Serenoa repens, Sabal bermudana
    12 points
  5. Is anyone growing Attalea rostrata? Quite an impressive palm! I have been spending a few days on Costa Rica's pacific coast and went to the Parque Nacional Carara (near Jaco). Ignoring the deferred trail maintenance, it is a really neat park (maybe 8km in total trails). I found a little research paper (in Spanish) that describes the vegetation of the park: "Vegetacion del Parque Nacional Carara, Costa Rica" (from 2001) https://epidendra.com/parquesnacionales/carara/jimenez_grayum_carara.pdf Anyway, the dominant palm species around here appears to be Attalea rostrata. It is a large, truly impressive palm and super abundant in the park and along the country side. It looks like this should be a super-easy palm and grows nicely in the shady forest as well as in sunny exposed positions. Strangely, though, it does not seem to be common in cultivation outside of its native range. Even Palmpedia's page is a tad anemic. Now, there is this urge to find a seed source 🙂. Anyway, I think this may qualify as a must-have if you have the space.
    11 points
  6. A palm I purchased as Chrysalidocarpus (Dypsis at the time) "Jurassic Park", which is opening a new frond drew my attention the last couple of days.
    11 points
  7. Today I went to a lowes near Me and saw the whole outside of the garden center flooded by palms the species that was there was Christmas palm Triangle palm Foxtail palm Dioon Bismark Coconut palm Florida thatch palm Fishtail palm Areca palm Bottle palm The address for this lowes is 10070 Estero Commons Place,Estero FL 33928
    10 points
  8. While industriously placing some finishing touches on my newly installed fish pond, I chanced to see my little Angel Face wandering about with something green in her mouth. I had to extricate myself from a very awkward position (on my bum, in the mud, wedged between a Bangalow palm and the pond) and go to find out what she was merrily munching upon. It was only my Chamaedorea metallica that took me 3 years to find. Nobody has them now, not even at the last 3 PACSOA shows had any. Immediate first aid was required. There was no time to go hunting for the seedling pot or burrow through 50 cubic metres of the pot pile to find one. In desperation I grabbed some seaweed solution and the nearest cup from the cupboard ( a 1968 Mikasa, Silk Flowers for those with taste enough to show interest) and placed my poor wounded baby in it, to soak up all those revitalising vitamins. As it was out of the pot anyway, I decided to pot it up a tiny fraction. Yes I know it's totally the wrong time of year but it is now a house pet so won't really know the Winter Solstice is almost upon us. Three days have passed since this disastrous incident occurred and the little palm is recuperating beautifully in it's updated residence. I have included a photo of him today and another shot of the callously unrepentant Angel Face. (making a rather rude face for the camera) Peachy
    9 points
  9. Three Dypsis hovomantsina, now Chrysalidocarpus, were purchased in April 2011 in 4-inch pots from Floribunda. They were potted up and grown until planted in the garden July 2014. They were brothers, always together, growing and looking like identical triplets. They were planted fairly close to each other, but each in a different situation: one on low hill made from local soil piled up during construction of a path, the 2nd in a low spot a short distance away, and the 3rd up on a higher mound created years before when part of the area was cleared and logs, soil and rocks were piled up and rotted and compacted over time. The one on the highest mound was thickly consumed in weeds off and on over the years, and was the last to form a trunk. I uncovered it again yesterday and this was the trunk reveal: The more mature siblings look like this: Any idea what might explain the pronounced difference?
    9 points
  10. Not the best of weather for taking pictures but here's an update. @maesy's palm has become massive. Mine is growing much slower. I don't know if that is because it is another (sub)species or because it is in poor soil or on that terrace. There have been several more plantings over the last couple of years but not all are accessible. This one is in a public place in Muralto near the train station. Thanks for looking.
    9 points
  11. Jim we are a little down the road, have you had the reveal yet to find out if it was an inflorescence hiding underneath. My larger specimen which is a double is still working on the first ring. Maybe by the end of this summer or in the fall it will happen on the larger trunk. The last boot that came off was about 2-3 inches below the soil, so I'm guessing about three more boots to come off before ringed trunk is above the soil line.
    9 points
  12. @quaman58 Here’s one I snapped a picture of a few weeks ago and it’s fantastic. Posted it on IG but can’t even remember if I posted it here. This picture was taken from a garden in Fullerton. Hmmmmm, who’s house could it be?? 🤔 -dale
    9 points
  13. 9 points
  14. First flower on my Decipiens hybrid and it’s massive! And the crown shafts are developing a nice lime green color to them. Entire plant:
    9 points
  15. Closeup. Left to right, Livistona nitida, Brahea decumbens, Serenoa repens, Sabal bermudana.
    8 points
  16. Still can't tell if this is Koghiensis or Dumasii, whatever it is i love it. It was bought as a hapala, but clearly not
    8 points
  17. Some of you may know that I moved from Oregon down to Texas this last January. Unfortunately I had to leave my garden that was approaching 8 years old and start all over again. I was able to bring a lot of small palms that I had been growing and purchased a few small and medium palms/plants to round out the mix. So I'm back to square one, and will not be purchasing any specimen palms like I did last time. Here is my first video tour for those of you who are interested. Most of the garden is between 4 and 10 weeks old so it has a long way to go to start looking respectable in my eyes. I figure a video is easier than posting pictures. There is also a link to my first video here before I started. Enjoy.
    8 points
  18. Coming out well now. 2 fronds where it was cut and 1 good spear
    8 points
  19. This Ravenea hildebrandtii caught my eye as I was watering today and I started to wonder why we don’t see more of these.
    8 points
  20. Drymophleous olivioformis in seed hopeful stage. Struttin. But not moving.
    8 points
  21. Closeup of the inflorescence of the Sabal minor 'Wakulla Dwarf'. Hard to tell from this pic, but it's shorter than knee high. Sabal uresana is the larger palm.
    7 points
  22. Another great palm I have managed to get in my collection is the yaray it seems to happy growing in my hothouse growing moderately at a medium pace not as slow as I thought for a copernica I guess once past the seedling stage they pick up a bit but a new palm for me the copernica
    7 points
  23. I was gifted this decipiens and am very grateful for the gift and it shall always remain special to me so thank you Kieran you’re gift will go to a special place in my garden and given the best gardening skills I have.
    7 points
  24. 7 points
  25. I have noticed that when the spear splits as a new leaf is about to open that the spear never splits "cleanly" like most palms. There is always some tearing with remnants on both the opening spear and the new emerging one that splits off. Just curious if anyone else has noticed anything like this. Photo examples below along with a couple of the base to show its size now. Getting the crown of leaves is difficult to photograph due to other plants and objects in the way.
    7 points
  26. My neighbour who lives in the same property as I do has an excavator and has been transplanting a few archontophoenix cunninghamiana palms around his property using his excavator to do so he has been having some great success in the last year after visiting my garden he got his excavator and went to town digging them up I gave him around 30 chambeyronia macrocarpa just to help him out he is in his 80s and is just discovering palms after he purchased the property 3 years ago which already had a small collection of some common palms he is a keen gardener I might have to give him some more palms I think you’re never to old to be a gardener.
    7 points
  27. One cute pinanga when small is the distichia cool tolerant loves water and is easy to grow a great little palm to have in a collection.
    6 points
  28. The few I see, generally look pretty good down here. Especially if they are reasonably taken care of, get a break from the sun, and get a little wind protection. Mine have grow fast, blasted by sun and exposed to wind, but their thin fragile leaflets can easily get beat up under these conditions.
    6 points
  29. Closeup. Sabal bermudana and Serenoa repens. The latter was selected for its blue color, and planted from a very small 1 gallon plant, perhaps 12 years ago, maybe a bit more.
    6 points
  30. Awesome pics, thanks for posting. Reminds me of Galveston here in TX. Not sure why people feel the need to make a bunch of comments about how x and y are going to die lol. I think we all know things are on borrowed time (us included), that's the beauty of it all. Love seeing zonepushing success for however long, hopefully many more warm winters! From what I remember, the plants I saw a few years ago along the St John's near Mandarin were even more impressive than the beaches.
    6 points
  31. I have two main sections to my garden the wet tropical plantings below my house and the dry sandstone area with lots of rocks above my house it can be challenging trying to grow at the back of the house with the main problem being the rocks and trying to dig a hole with only certain palms growing up the backyard with persistence you can accomplish a lot.
    6 points
  32. Palms / tropicals around Jax beach pics taken 2022 thru present. Average min last 30 years 28 degrees .
    6 points
  33. Light certainly, but heat is also going to produce results. I got one planted today right where my failed Majesty palm was last year. That's a 4x4 planting area.
    6 points
  34. Many of you are probably familiar with this, but this is the first time I've come across the story of the Judean Date Palm.
    6 points
  35. Common names are a necessary evil in some situations especially for nurseries. The reality is that the majority of the population tune out unless they hear something descriptive about a plant that they can understand in their own language (think Golden Cane Palm vs Chrysalidocarpus lutescens). There are a few problems with common names. They are a serious source of confusion because palms are known by different common names in different areas of the world or even different regions in the same country (A cunninghamiana = Bangalow palm, piccabeen palm and king palm, but king palm is also a name for other Archontophoenix species including A alexandrae which also goes by Alexandra palm or Alexander palm which is also somehow a name for Prychosperma elegans!!!). Chrysalidocarpus lutescens is also known not only as Golden Cane Palm but also butterfly palm and Areca palm which is a completely different genus, similarly Cocos palm for Syagrus romanzoffiana which is also known as Queen palm is some places. The next and possibly even bigger problem with common names is that they don’t apply to the vast majority of species. I often get people ask me what the common name (or sometimes they even say real name!) of species are in my garden. No good answer exists for many.
    6 points
  36. Andre, you are not pretentious, you are educated. Latin binomials are best, in South America there are about eight species called "chonta" palms. I have little patience with palm growers who are resistant to learning proper names.
    6 points
  37. Large Bismarkia next to a large Royal:
    6 points
  38. Heres an update on my Brahea armata and what I've learned.. this palm is only now starting to pick up growth speed...so at least for me.. the establishment period is about 10 years.. !!! This palm prefers rainwater only (my observation).. and I suspect it would grow faster if it had more. I haven't protected it in over 8 years..which I don't think it needed it to begin with. Pretty decent palm for albuquerque which requires patience..and perhaps quick protections during the coldest winters. The leaves are harder than filifera by about 2-3 degrees before showing damage...so that's a plus as well.. just really slow to get itself situated.. It's being partially shaded now by my filiferas..but this imo is a full sun only palm as well..
    6 points
  39. My property that I live on has a large grove of cunninghamiana palms growing along the creek bed at the bottom of the hill I live on it’s a hundred acre property a community (yes the old hippie commune) developed in the late seventies with a five acre share of ten allotments with 50 acres of community land a very unique microclimate for growing palms if palms grow wild in your area half your growing problems are over with Mother Nature giving you an advantage also in my area Livistonia Australis grow along the gymea Lillie (Doryanthus) in a very unique location not far from my property also there is the ocean influence with ocean views at the top of the hill helping to create the microclimate I have therefore giving me the advantage of some of the rare and exotic palms I have along with thermal mass from the sandstone in the soil and very large rocks lying around helping to create what I call my little paradise for my garden and nursery.
    6 points
  40. Here they are all in the ground with a mix of white Caribbean sand and worm hummus and then topping off with white sand for the looks.
    5 points
  41. Today it caught my attention that my Bismarckia nobilis “Mayotte” is in serious need of maintenance. I keep a lot of potted plants below it so when a frond falls there’s always the risk of it smashing something. It’s a difficult job cleaning him up but I got to get on it before the tropical storms start.
    5 points
  42. 3 1/2 years later here is an update of mine. Definitely slow, but still happy it’s a beetle survivor. Wish I had more of these…
    5 points
  43. Someone pulled over while I was mowing, and took a pic of this palm with their plant-IDing app, and said, “Nice Butia”…..
    5 points
  44. A gaggle of Carpentaria acuminata at ANSG:
    5 points
  45. Dew point is the temperature the air would need to be to make the humidity level 100%. The humidity percentage is the amount of water that air parcel has in it relative to that specific air temperature's capacity for water retention. I'm sure someone here may have a better answer, but i always look at dew point for a measure of comfort over percent humidity.
    5 points
  46. In my experience, they are one of the high performing palms. I guess they do need their sun and heat to grow (& build resistance) but I have found them quite hardy once established. Mine survived single digits. A large specimen at JFGardens went through 7F unprotected. We do have these wet cold days too! Definitely not the most cold hardy (I'll bite... 😛)
    5 points
  47. Passed what seems like a tropical looking yard in Winter Park. Near Howell Branch and Cochise Trail. Google pic is a year old and I definitely noticed the coconuts above the fence line.
    5 points
  48. Not sure if variegation or mottling due to shade, but organizing the shade house today this small Licuala Spinosa caught my eye.
    5 points
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