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  1. True story, my neighbors call me Tarzan for a variety or reasons, maybe it's the loin cloth I wear around the yard 😆. Having a jungle is a must for any respectable Tarzan. This is just the "main drag" down the middle, there's so much more but iIwas working in the back and just did a quicky. Sorry no sound , it looks a lot better if you select HD. Not a big youtube guy so not sure how to do all this stuff.
    22 points
  2. I don't see many of these around nor many posts. This is one of my favorites and today it definitely caught my eye. Total eye candy for me. Post them it you got them. I always enjoy photos of others well grown palms. Cheers Tin
    21 points
  3. I sold Palmpedia several months ago to someone who has the resources and passion to keep it going. It became too much for me alone to continue and provide the time and expense to do it justice. The new owner is an IPS Member, and a long time lurker on PalmTalk. He is a terrific guy, capable businessman, and a palm/plant lover. I think it is a good fit, and the future of the site is in better hands now that he is involved. Give him time, and I expect many more improvements. Thanks to all those who provided financial and emotional support during its creation and almost 20 year run so far. I too use the site often, and hope to for another 20 years.
    18 points
  4. Lots of things are more tender than coconuts, coconuts can reach fruiting maturity well into the subtropics like halfway up the Florida peninsula, the southern tip of Texas, etc. The real cold tender stuff is generally from the central Indian and Pacific ocean areas (Seychelles, Indonesia, New Guinea, Melanesia, and equatorial Polynesia) such as Cyrtostachys, most Hydriastele, Iguanura, Calyptrocalyx, Phoenicophorium, Manicaria, Clinostigma, Pigafetta, etc. These palms are generally native to areas with all time record lows above 60F/16C.
    12 points
  5. Here’s an updated picture of my Hedyscepe aquired in March ‘21. It was finally grounded sometime last spring and has appreciated it. Looks like the base has definitely fattened up and taking on that coveted Hedyscepe look all of us love albeit small still. I planted another one in my front yard. This one was a small 1G and is it a bit more sun. Doesn’t seem to mind actually. Both these are growing right thru our “winter” here in SoCal and just pushed new fronds. -dale
    10 points
  6. Cyrtostacys renda the Lipstick Palm dead below 50 F
    10 points
  7. Hello Everyone, Thank you for some of the positive messages, i am thankful for all of them. My name is Joao Santos Costa, i am from Portugal and i am the new responsible for the management and administration of Palmpedia and connected resources. Palmpedia as been over the years a fundamental and unavoidable tool, an endless source of information to the palm growing hobby. I am forever thankful to Dean, Ed Vaile, and all people who have contributed immensely to the creation of this incredible resource. My path with palms started more than ten years ago, when i wanted to create a big garden around my former residence in Lisbon, and wanted to have some privacy from all the neighbours, together with the perpetual feeling of evasion and "vacations feeling" every-time i would step home. Likewise many of you the inicial humble idea of planting a few palms turned out to be an incurable addiction, that month after month started to influence where we would spend the weekends, to where we would go for vacations. From a nice garden the things escalated quickly and i ended up with a full size jungle with dozens of mature specimens, I got hooked. I loved every bit of the new lifestyle, this garden could provide, so did my children and my wife. From late night barbecues, to tiki jacuzzi parties, to bird watching with my toddler, was a fantastic experience that forever change my mindset on the "art of living". Professionally, i have responsibilities in a group of companies with ranging activities from managing real estate portfolios, to construction and hospitality businesses. Few years ago, i started the acquisition of multiple agricultural investments and have turned my hobby into a full size business operation. Currently we have 3 state of the art productions facilities, manufactured entirely in double glaze polycarbonate, biomass heating, evaporative cooling, and full climate control, where we are fully devoted to the germination of palm trees. We are also establishing plantations in Sao Tome and Principe, and Mauritius for the more tropical varieties. As of today we hold several tens of thousands of 2-3 year old palm seedlings of around 237 varieties and growing. I am focused in creating top quality plants. Our aim is to introduce recently discovered or unusual palms in the ornamental market, after all i guess we are all tired of finding the same options for sale in the conventional garden center! I have quite ambitious plan for the new Palmpedia, and i hope to have you all along for the journey, but i also understand that i will not be able to be a very consensual and accommodate everyone requests, but i will try! In what concerns the future of Palmpedia, our plan is to keep the entire structure in the wiki platform like was originally intended and allow edition, inputs, and submission of pictures and content. We are currently working in the log in and users platform to allow people to sign in and edit the content of the pages, i believe in the next few days will be operational. Also i understand that there are several scientific revisions that need update, and we are currently compiling with the help of fellow forum members the list of updates needed to perform. So if you have a suggestion or topic requiring update we are thankful to receive them by email to info@palmpedia.com. Palmpedia will remain a free and open "go to place" for palm information, independently where you are in the globe. Regarding our plans on the comercial front. We are currently testing the new online marketplace, that will be made available on the website. This will be a multi vendor online shop, (much like amazon) and will allow verified nurseries, brands, individual growers, and hobbyists to sell their palms, and their seedlings. With a very simple and user friendly platform will allow every nursery to have equitable online exposition and a simplified online sales spot. If you know a nursery let them know that we are working in order they can soon list their palms and exotics stock in the world leading marketplace we are creating. I strongly believe in this model because because is the only way to provide a truly global service without the limitations of phytosanitary regulations. In other words, depending on the place you are and will access the online shop, the assortment you see available to purchase is within your geographic range to be delivered without need of phytosanitary certificate. I am always available at info@palmpedia.com I hope to have all of you along, Best Regards, Joao
    9 points
  8. Surprised to find this howea forsteriana while out on a walk in the neighborhood in SF. Seems happy enough to be fruiting despite being battered by the full sun and wind. Any idea how old it could be? The houses here were mostly built around 1900 +/- 20 years.
    9 points
  9. Surprise find in Baton Rouge. Mature Sabal mexicana planting behind Parrain's Seafood Restaurant.
    8 points
  10. My mule got very big fast. However now that it is mature, it blooms nearly non-stop and the amount of fronds it puts out every year has vastly slowed. It went from pretty easy to protect, to nearly impossible (without risking life and limb). Last winter it had greater than 50% foliar damage from the ice storm and low of 18 or 19. Took all summer to look OK, and I was hoping it would not get damaged this winter.... The Christmas freeze this year, with a low of 18, resulted in around 50% foliar damage again. So will look like junk this year too. I don't know how many consecutive years it can take getting partially defoliated before it doesn't have the energy to recover. I'm hoping we get a string of winters without temps to damage it so it can at least look a little better. I know it is a matter of time before there is a cold event that outright kills it. I'm thinking if/when there is a major event forecast to go below 15, I'm going to pre-emptively cut all the fronds off and deal with protecting a "telephone pole". With the mature growth rate I'm seeing now, It seems like it would take 2-3 years to re-grow a decently full crown. You might get lucky and get a mule that doesn't show foliar damage until lower temps, but that is just a roll of the dice. Early protection in 2015-16 when it was a few years old from a strap leaf. 2017, getting harder to protect. 2021... my sad attempt at protecting the trunk pre ice storm. It's looking pretty sad right now, but alive.... I supposed I should snap a photo to update.
    7 points
  11. Areca macrocalyx. - Makes Cyrtostachys renda look like Sabal minor... Early plants grown in S. Florida came in under the name A. warburgiana and were quickly diagnosed with no cold tolerance at all, receiving cold damage in the mid 50'sºF (12ºC). After a number of years, it was lumped in with A. macrocalyx. This species was the origin of the garden tour anecdote: "Don't walk past it with a cold drink..." I have seen the palm in collections and always hangs in there at best, including the red crownshaft variety (A. macrocalyx var. 'Mariae'). Collectors in the Florida Keys have 'been there, tried that' and will often not give it another chance after the cold kills it. Ryan
    7 points
  12. This has to be my favorite (larger) licuala. It always holds its leaf no matter how much wind it gets
    7 points
  13. 7 points
  14. Hello friends! Jeff and Su wish you a happy new year and have plenty of surprises on the new price list, plus many favorites, nearly 250 species. Some highlights are the blue form of Dypsis decipiens, which has long been a favorite of people touring the garden and is sure to be a showstopper in any garden, as well as the rare and beautiful understory palm Asterogyne guianensis. Both forms of Joey are back in 4in pots, Pinanga "Maroon Crownshaft" in two sizes, the golden form of Livistona benthamii, and limited amounts of harder to find palms such as the majestic Roscheria from the Seychelles. 60+ new palms / sizes added to the new list, filter them out by typing (N) into the search, but the list is still as extensive as ever with all the usual offerings. View the price list at https://floribunda.xyz/pricelist Have a great new year and email / call Jeff with any questions or details before you place your order. FAQ Here // Contact Here Axel's (Mauna Kea Cloudforest) thread on Blue Decipiens from 2014 with great high res photos: Please note that there has been a big shift in nomenclature for the genus Dypsis, many have been moved back to Chrysalidocarpus and we have adjusted our list accordingly, so if a Dypsis that you are used to has disappeared, search for Chrysalidocarpus to check if it has been moved there.
    7 points
  15. Jan 2023 update. Haven't protected this winter..
    6 points
  16. Looks almost like plastic Tin. Nice little palms with deep metallic green color. Here is one that's both pinnae and entire leaves on the same plant and one that is totally entire. Tim
    6 points
  17. This year the harvest on my Trachycarpus palms is exceptionally good. One of my trees has the leaves hanging from the weight of the heavy inflorescenses. This one takes the crown this year in terms of seed production.
    6 points
  18. Hello fellow palm lovers, I have some exciting news (or at least I think so). I was recently looking for a map that showed the distribution of palms in Mexico, and I came across some but couldn't access the article they were from, for some reason you have to pay $58 to purchase and read the article. So, I emailed one of the authors of the article, Rafael Hernández-Guzmán, and immediately he responded and sent me a copy of it. So here it is for those curious about Mexican palms. I think Mexico isn't talked about enough considering how diverse the ecosystems it contains are and the number and diversity of its native palm species. file:///Users/alexhigh/Downloads/2021%20Macedo-Santana%20et%20al.,%20Diversity%20patterns%20of%20palms%20in%20Mexico.pdf
    6 points
  19. If you haven't been, go check out Shore Acres Park near Coos Bay, OR. I didn't have time to snap any good pictures of the park except for these 3 because the crowd I was with was on the move to view the king tide waves event nearby. Anyways, here's to a quick thread of some zone 9 goodness. Plenty of New Zealand flax. There are tons of very mature cordylines there as well. If you have ever visited the OR coast, you will instantly notice the Abundance of mature cordyline trees. There was also an attempt to grow a Nikau palm (Rhopalostylis sapida) aka Shaving brush palm in the garden, but the person who planted it told me its no longer there unfortunately. Looking at that first picture...I would not mind at all if my Trachy had a trunk like that! very tropical looking. Peep the Bare trunk Trachy in the background. Nice pair of Chamaerops humilis growing here.
    6 points
  20. I have this 20g Beccariophoenix alfredii that needs to be upsized or planted in the ground ASAP. A couple photos with me for scale. Pickup in Leucadia. Asking $250. Mahalo
    5 points
  21. Anyone willing to pick them up (Miami, Fl) I’m glad to gift them… giving away two (2) of each. First come, first serve Copernicia Hospita (2) 1Gal Copernicia Baileyana (2) 3Gal Copernicia petticoat (2) 3 Gal Corypha Umbraculifera (2) 1Gal
    5 points
  22. I’ve protected mine here in maine, because I’m zone 6b usually but some winters I’m zone 7. It’s survived the last four winters from temps down to -5 outside the green house and inside it was still 2 degrees f. No troubles or loss of fronds. The sabal minor I added that was unprotected last winter made it thru with frond damage but regrew last summer with a few surviving fronds. I hope that after many winters with allowing some extremes and then protecting the palm it will slowly become more hardy and also endure the cold moisture we have here but it hasn’t seemed to be bothered by the cold air (I open it up after most storms so one side is exposed to the elements. december 2019 may 2020 January 2023 sabal minor
    5 points
  23. Here’s a better picture of my large one; it’s starting to rival the ones in Hawaii, at least a bit
    5 points
  24. I've grown thousands of these from seed and would estimate that eventually 2 - 3 percent, at most, turned out to have divided fronds.
    5 points
  25. Hey, who dat? That is my man Tracy..... we took the photo just for you Dave. Hilo Jason brought Tracy and his wife Dana over for a tour of my garden on Sunday, we had a great time talking palms and plants. It was a highlight of my week, maybe the month. Anyhow, glad to see these Licuala growing so well in SoCal, they are nice palms at any size. Tim
    5 points
  26. Does anyone know how the Juania australis is doing in the Earlscliffe garden in Ireland? I visited this palm back in march 2009 and it looked healthy back then. It must have grown a lot.... Me with the Earlscliffe Juania, 2009
    5 points
  27. 01730d60a41cff4e289c490f9fe7c0ab23d71ca80a.mp4
    5 points
  28. I remember well. I had a sticky note on my desk for years, listing the consecutive days temps that were well below freezing: 24f, 25f, 27f, 29f, ...there were at least five days in the 20s at my place in Lemon Grove. Later that year I met my now neighbor Bob Hastings and as we walked around his Spring Valley garden I asked how cold he got back in January and he walked me over to a hi-lo thermometer mounted to a tall pine tree. He said he hadn't reset it yet from winter and it read 38f. The unblemished banana trees in the neighborhood confirmed this. Within a few months we had bought the property next door to Bob and started Manambe Lavaka, our current garden. In 17 years I've never seen below 36f (except for down in the bottom of the canyon) with most years bottoming out at 42f.
    5 points
  29. seedlings everywhere Phyllostachys bambusoides Enjoy!
    5 points
  30. I've got one of them going through the roof downstairs. Since the flood the growth is phenomenal and of course all the rain we've had since.
    5 points
  31. Looks like you already had a serious problem with this palm (the dark grey dry-wood and rust-colored areas). The snap-off area is only the zone that is white in color, about half of the surface area. I would pour some peroxide over that ruddy area and also make sure there isn't something actively affecting the health of the plant. Otherwise your apical meristem does look to be intact and it should regrow (though you will always see damage there). But is there a way you can put that palm into the ground? It looks desperately in need. Ravenea are river-dwellers and want lots of water and fertilizer...also remember that the root-initiation-zone of palms (at the base of the trunk) in California needs to be continuously covered by soil. Since it is the area where palms grow new roots, the dry atmosphere will stop them from forming, most likely leaving you with a very unstable and unhealthy palm over time.
    4 points
  32. I’m calling it, winter is over!
    4 points
  33. Burretiokentia koghiensis and Cyphophoenix elegans (in the background) opening up new fronds after one of the wettest winters we’ve seen in forever and a couple nights with temps into the high 30’s.
    4 points
  34. A video from yesterday from the rainforest area. 93CC50CA-217A-47D8-9A8E-A37E0A2A9F6D.MOV
    4 points
  35. My thanks to those of you who have visited our Nursery and made comments here. We have been in business for 42 years, presently located in Encinitas, CA. We grow about 1600 species of palms, cycads and tropical plants. We do mail orders within the U.S. only. We invite all to drop in and visit the Nursery. You may also check out our extensive website. We are located at 450 Ocean View Ave in Encinitas, 92024. Phone 619 291 4605 Website: www.junglemusic.net Phil Bergman Jungle Music
    4 points
  36. Anyone growing Pinguicula agnata "True Blue". I just caught my first bug.
    4 points
  37. Flush coming along nicely....
    4 points
  38. Thank you tinman10101! The Vulcano looks great! at home in a 5g.
    4 points
  39. I remember it well, .. I had been into palms for a bit over 2 years and some somewhat mild winters where I was under the impression it was an easy hobby! My back yard hit 26F for 2 nights and 28F for 2 more, only 1.25 miles from the coast. What it DID do is give us invaluable data to start the freeze damage forum for all to learn from. Many surprises and discoveries were made, some superstars thought to tender were less so than thought and a few that were wimps under stress. The surprise I always remember was Chambeyronia macrocarpa. They looked fine, some other palms were brown the morning, a large part more were brown within a day or two. But the Chamby's were deceptive to take nearly a week to turn brown... leading to some brief hope they were undamaged. The DoomsDave delivery was a good thing and Thanks to all that made it happen. After that episode and for a couple more years of late night, early am worries and going outside to see how cold, check temps etc., I adopted the "Schrodinger's Cat" approach to cold weather here. If I don't get up, or go check outside..it didn't get that cold I watch weather reports and if @33-34 is predicted, I bring a few tender seedlings inside overnight.. other than that, it's every palm for themselves!
    4 points
  40. Here are more London CIDP's that I didn't post in the previous update. Goes to show just how many are out there nowadays. These ones aren't as big as most of the other ones I posted on the previous page however. Still some impressive specimens though. These first ones are in north London and got defoliated badly in the 2010 freeze when they were tiny. They have recovered fine since. This is the nearest 'big' CIDP to my location on the outskirts of southeast London, about 20 minutes drive away. There are tons lurking out there in back yards that cannot be seen or reached. I have posted a few overhead aerial backyard examples.
    4 points
  41. Those are my two best exemplars growing from seed thank to Justin Humphry. The left one had been almost a goner in perlite, until substrate changed to almost pure pine bark. It has mow the strongest root system of the two.
    4 points
  42. Chinati Mountains, Ruidosa, Candelaria, Shafter, Chispa road. Etc. Yucca torreyi and elata in Texas
    4 points
  43. What I believe to be “pure” Yucca thompsoniana growing east of Fort Stockton. They are smaller than the form typically in cultivation, which hybridizes with Yucca rostrata . There is an even small dwarf form that is a hybrid with Yucca reverchonii. Neither of those species grew in this area.
    4 points
  44. Livistona chinensis I'd say
    4 points
  45. My Licuala ramsayi growing in Loxahatchee Groves.
    4 points
  46. Sorry it took me a moment to get these together, been a little fatigued. I've posted most of these to palmtalk here and there but sporadically across different post so here they are compiled I took a couple of these pictures and went on google for the ones I didnt have and I'm sure their are more in town that I remember but not accessible with google maps for clear photo but the the "common palms" I see but not widely planted are chamaerops, butia, trachys and sabals.
    4 points
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