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Trachycarpus Fortunei Growth Since Planting Early March


jwf1983
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3rd photo was still in pot, just before planted (1st photo). This was second week of March 2022. The second and 4th photo were taken today,  July 17, 2022.  I’m surprised how quickly this took once in ground here in the Capitol Hill neighborhood in Washington, DC.

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Good looking palm.

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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Good job

Youtube (TN Tropics) 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), louisiana(5), palmetto (1)  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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Doing good…I’m just down 395 from you and you’ll be amazed at what you can accomplish with a Trachy in our zone…and your zone may be slightly higher…here’s an amateur timeline to encourage your efforts…beginning stages…2014 or so…

65DEAB43-F054-44A6-A9C5-68C94C3EC2BF.thumb.jpeg.79ae8544a51a48dd21c6d276f4a22c0e.jpeg

Progression pics over the years…

CDEB6F6B-AACD-4765-97D7-F39434448E08.thumb.jpeg.4a34083d33d5598f85604a719471f369.jpeg

07E92999-9C82-46F8-8C7C-544FCEFC0440.thumb.jpeg.fa413cc53bd7a4fcdaac8db9a4358c71.jpeg

 

E4573CD2-9607-4378-8559-EA5DC7544067.thumb.jpeg.04ab044d400ac9642591038c0620a9ed.jpeg

22978E2C-499C-457F-ADF1-6104EE4DA569.thumb.jpeg.ad21e0a93bb004979a7752a98853aa5b.jpeg

42C10813-6ACD-4E0B-907C-3D84C00130E8.thumb.jpeg.d365cd4716661d003c7e7e2cfdf1b445.jpeg

59454D34-A0AB-4560-B882-0606BFEB0FC2.thumb.jpeg.ca043ab69f4927625ec40ce5119deb85.jpeg

CC99B125-7EEC-4683-866B-B417FD7448FF.thumb.jpeg.b58be7c7b7a21fa13959ab46563d6d2a.jpeg

Just watch it grow!


 

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Wow! Thanks for this.  Remarkable growth for just 8 years.  I wouldn't have thought they would grow that fast.  I have mine along a south facing fence that gets early morning sun exposure to about 3PM this time of year.  Having moved to this house in December, after living in the far upper NW DC (much more tree covered part of town), the proximity to downtown and overall density in our new neighborhood seem to keep minimum temps a bit higher.  I have confidence my Trachy will do fine during winter, and I have more confidence after seeing your timeline.  

Additionally we have had a Cycas Revoluta in a larger pot for 6 years outside without cover.  It's new sunnier orientation resulted in flush of 10 new fronds second to last week in May.  It's the earliest we've ever had a flush.  My wife is from the most southern part of Brazil, and her mother suggested Psidium cattleyanum, "since it get's cold during winter there too."  I think I know the end result of it, but, at least for now, it too is taking off.  

 

Thanks again for the great timeline photos!

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6 minutes ago, jwf1983 said:

I have confidence my Trachy will do fine during winter, and I have more confidence after seeing your timeline.  

Thanks again for the great timeline photos!

Just FYI I have a couple Trachycarpus growth rate videos on my Youtube if you search for them (TNtropics).  If you're in zone 7a you might need to think about winter protection going forward and you can find a bit of that on there as well.

Youtube (TN Tropics) 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), louisiana(5), palmetto (1)  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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Hi jwf,

Nice looking Trachy!  I have three growing in Olney MD.  (for about 5 years so not nearly as big as Allen's). Each winter I put about a foot of oak leaves over the roots for some simple passive protection.  At that size I also tried to protect it from freezing rain with either a beach umbrella or a wire cage with plastic attached to the top (used a couple of times a winter).  Good Luck!

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On 7/21/2022 at 12:39 PM, jwf1983 said:

Wow! Thanks for this.  Remarkable growth for just 8 years.  I wouldn't have thought they would grow that fast.  I have mine along a south facing fence that gets early morning sun exposure to about 3PM this time of year.  Having moved to this house in December, after living in the far upper NW DC (much more tree covered part of town), the proximity to downtown and overall density in our new neighborhood seem to keep minimum temps a bit higher.  I have confidence my Trachy will do fine during winter, and I have more confidence after seeing your timeline.  

Additionally we have had a Cycas Revoluta in a larger pot for 6 years outside without cover.  It's new sunnier orientation resulted in flush of 10 new fronds second to last week in May.  It's the earliest we've ever had a flush.  My wife is from the most southern part of Brazil, and her mother suggested Psidium cattleyanum, "since it get's cold during winter there too."  I think I know the end result of it, but, at least for now, it too is taking off.  

 

Thanks again for the great timeline photos!

You’re very welcome…your situation sounds great with the fence and the south face…I’m situated much the same way…you may want to look into Sabal Brazoria…in time it forms a trunk but you need lots of room for it to grow, fronds are huge…I really want to try a Cycas and will look into them soon…I remember someone from Maryland posted some huge ones with a lot of age so maybe a good choice for my zone? I’ll look into it…all the best, neighbor.

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Once they get bigger they grow faster.  Mine has already put on 24" of new trunk this season.

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Here’s my oldest Cycas Revoluta. Has never spent a day inside here in DC during the winter, though I typically throw burlap around (or as close to) the caudex, and, on the coldest nights, a larger white burlap that covers the top and tightens with a drawstring.   There’s a noticeable different even between Friendship Heights area to Capitol Hill in terms of winter minimums. I have somewhat of a reliable weather station, and have been monitoring closely from the time we settled in this part of DC in December.  This past winter we hit 20 degrees twice, though many other nights in the mid to upper 20’s, particularly in January. The 6 inches of snow did suck, but I just brushed it off the fronds.  They do sometimes take a hit some winters. I gave him a haircut early spring and it flushed another 10 fronds by mid to end of May.  We have 3 other smaller Sagos.. The other, smaller, Sagos flushed 6-8 new fronds by end of June.  They always come back and always flush. That south facing fence is EVERYTHING.  It makes such a difference.  It helps knowing on the coldest days the sun hits everything first thing in the morning. That said, I have debated planting this larger one since we moved here, but decided to give it a year to adjust to more sunlight at our new place. Maybe I’m just worried one winter will decimate it, despite it being potted and outside year round for going on 7 years.  The other picture is a Yellow Strawberry Guava. Just got it.  It’s common in my wife’s native state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. She thinks in a few years, with care, it may survive year round.  I have plenty of doubts. The sagos push it here in downtown DC.  They can take a beating, but, overall, they seem to adjust with minimal care/protection. Just need the courage to plant one. 

9591D213-5F13-4BB0-B613-04D9EE581B87.jpeg

EF6E74A0-AADD-468A-9B74-8AC4C363EDC7.jpeg

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  • 1 month later...
19 hours ago, jwf1983 said:

BA9D837E-637F-4CF0-A59B-1EB3AD0DE08D.jpeg

270CE290-0BA9-4AB0-B9E6-AC320D6F97AF.jpeg

Nice growth! Looks very happy…on your way to a very nice Trachy…I think this is its first winter in ground? Give it lots of water heading into fall…to protect this winter if you like, get a heavy gauge tomato cage…maybe 4’ tall or so…release the connections to open it up and have the opening face south…line the cage with black landscaping cloth and fashion a cover for the opening…top with a cheap umbrella…works great and you can keep it open most of the time anyway with our winters. Here is my contraption for my Brazoria but its gotten too big now for it but I want to let all my palms go into winter now with minimal intervention, meaning, I’ll intervene in a real polar anomaly…I do have a second year Trachy in ground that I plan on protecting with the “contraption”…I’ll do it again next winter then give it a go on its own…

D8F89FEE-4F18-458E-A774-AD00FA70E45E.thumb.jpeg.49f2891d37476933f97b260f1ee66f20.jpeg

 

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On 7/24/2022 at 7:02 PM, jwf1983 said:

Here’s my oldest Cycas Revoluta. Has never spent a day inside here in DC during the winter, though I typically throw burlap around (or as close to) the caudex, and, on the coldest nights, a larger white burlap that covers the top and tightens with a drawstring.   There’s a noticeable different even between Friendship Heights area to Capitol Hill in terms of winter minimums. I have somewhat of a reliable weather station, and have been monitoring closely from the time we settled in this part of DC in December.  This past winter we hit 20 degrees twice, though many other nights in the mid to upper 20’s, particularly in January. The 6 inches of snow did suck, but I just brushed it off the fronds.  They do sometimes take a hit some winters. I gave him a haircut early spring and it flushed another 10 fronds by mid to end of May.  We have 3 other smaller Sagos.. The other, smaller, Sagos flushed 6-8 new fronds by end of June.  They always come back and always flush. That south facing fence is EVERYTHING.  It makes such a difference.  It helps knowing on the coldest days the sun hits everything first thing in the morning. That said, I have debated planting this larger one since we moved here, but decided to give it a year to adjust to more sunlight at our new place. Maybe I’m just worried one winter will decimate it, despite it being potted and outside year round for going on 7 years.  The other picture is a Yellow Strawberry Guava. Just got it.  It’s common in my wife’s native state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. She thinks in a few years, with care, it may survive year round.  I have plenty of doubts. The sagos push it here in downtown DC.  They can take a beating, but, overall, they seem to adjust with minimal care/protection. Just need the courage to plant one. 

9591D213-5F13-4BB0-B613-04D9EE581B87.jpeg

EF6E74A0-AADD-468A-9B74-8AC4C363EDC7.jpeg

Really cool seeing a sago in DC, They're are some growing in WNC , without protection but ... It's been  a mild few years and if when we have a bad winter they're probably gonna die.  image.png.7caf9565b5b9842e1f660f54812b1cd6.pngimage.png.28c0c903334f9760a801dea2705dc9c2.png

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Where in western NC area are you?  There are a couple of things that I feel assist in the winter for me. Some are benefits of the urban concrete jungle. Winter location is facing south, within relative close proximity to a central air/heat unit. I have a decent digital weather station, and have noticed an increased variance of 10-15 degrees within several feet of that unit, compared to other south facing locations at the other end of our fence. To this point, this is purely speculation, but our home is at one of the lowest elevations in the District.  It’s notably warmer, more humid in the summer, and slightly milder in the winter compared to other parts of the city, particularly north and west. It’s in between both rivers, but buildings and home obstruct cold breezes or moderating impacts to an extent. This may only be a few degrees any given day, but sometimes that’s the difference.  Our temps are taken at DCA.  It’s always been a controversial representation of weather and temps due to its location in VA and elevation a few feet above the river surrounding it and having direct influence over the reading there. Not the best representation of the general area (like many airport stations).  From my station data, we average about 4-5 degrees above the readings at DCA, sometimes more during the springtime when the river water is still cold.  Without the south facing location, and perhaps residual warmth from the house and high density buildings around it, these sagos may already have been toast.  Even with these micro climatic factors, the sagos don’t exactly love winter here. They bare the scars of the worst winters. But I can’t help but truly appreciate their inherent ability to adapt, and continue to grow each year.  All it takes is one horrific, historically cold winter to end it all.  And while it may mean the demise of the sagos, it likely will also be the end of the the Aedes aegypti colonies surviving winters and growing in noticeable presence year over year.  Very few wide open spaces around here.  What we do have are lots of residual heat from the urban heat island, low elevation, relative proximity to large bodies of water, and lots of cracks and crevices beneath homes, sidewalks, buildings and below ground that are often much warmer than the thermometer may indicate. This often is just the boost needed to sustain life of species that otherwise would have no chance here. 

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1 hour ago, jwf1983 said:

Where in western NC area are you?  There are a couple of things that I feel assist in the winter for me. Some are benefits of the urban concrete jungle. Winter location is facing south, within relative close proximity to a central air/heat unit. I have a decent digital weather station, and have noticed an increased variance of 10-15 degrees within several feet of that unit, compared to other south facing locations at the other end of our fence. To this point, this is purely speculation, but our home is at one of the lowest elevations in the District.  It’s notably warmer, more humid in the summer, and slightly milder in the winter compared to other parts of the city, particularly north and west. It’s in between both rivers, but buildings and home obstruct cold breezes or moderating impacts to an extent. This may only be a few degrees any given day, but sometimes that’s the difference.  Our temps are taken at DCA.  It’s always been a controversial representation of weather and temps due to its location in VA and elevation a few feet above the river surrounding it and having direct influence over the reading there. Not the best representation of the general area (like many airport stations).  From my station data, we average about 4-5 degrees above the readings at DCA, sometimes more during the springtime when the river water is still cold.  Without the south facing location, and perhaps residual warmth from the house and high density buildings around it, these sagos may already have been toast.  Even with these micro climatic factors, the sagos don’t exactly love winter here. They bare the scars of the worst winters. But I can’t help but truly appreciate their inherent ability to adapt, and continue to grow each year.  All it takes is one horrific, historically cold winter to end it all.  And while it may mean the demise of the sagos, it likely will also be the end of the the Aedes aegypti colonies surviving winters and growing in noticeable presence year over year.  Very few wide open spaces around here.  What we do have are lots of residual heat from the urban heat island, low elevation, relative proximity to large bodies of water, and lots of cracks and crevices beneath homes, sidewalks, buildings and below ground that are often much warmer than the thermometer may indicate. This often is just the boost needed to sustain life of species that otherwise would have no chance here. 

 

On 9/15/2022 at 7:05 PM, GregVirginia7 said:

Nice growth! Looks very happy…on your way to a very nice Trachy…I think this is its first winter in ground? Give it lots of water heading into fall…to protect this winter if you like, get a heavy gauge tomato cage…maybe 4’ tall or so…release the connections to open it up and have the opening face south…line the cage with black landscaping cloth and fashion a cover for the opening…top with a cheap umbrella…works great and you can keep it open most of the time anyway with our winters. Here is my contraption for my Brazoria but its gotten too big now for it but I want to let all my palms go into winter now with minimal intervention, meaning, I’ll intervene in a real polar anomaly…I do have a second year Trachy in ground that I plan on protecting with the “contraption”…I’ll do it again next winter then give it a go on its own…

D8F89FEE-4F18-458E-A774-AD00FA70E45E.thumb.jpeg.49f2891d37476933f97b260f1ee66f20.jpeg

 

Here’s the tiny sago photo I messaged you about. Not sure why I couldn’t attach it there.  Would LOVE the Brazoria!

353C0FCB-D532-4771-9D06-1738973BFA87.jpeg

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19 hours ago, jwf1983 said:

 

Here’s the tiny sago photo I messaged you about. Not sure why I couldn’t attach it there.  Would LOVE the Brazoria!

353C0FCB-D532-4771-9D06-1738973BFA87.jpeg

For sure…Brazoria is amenable to our zone…was curious how they did in that terrible Texas freeze and it appears this Texas native did really well…a lot of that has to do with establishment no doubt but our zone is really lacking in trunking palms so it’s a good candidate…be ready for it to just sort of sit and sit and sit…it is a Sabal after all but once it finishes sinking its tap root/subterranean trunk into the ground, it explodes! Here it is today…

23068796-0A1B-4655-B681-987666A01A0B.thumb.jpeg.11e80ee24a9c2da9e9f75f75e7e64860.jpeg

Here is around 14 years ago…

F4DA2927-1AFC-498E-9082-D24ED789848D.thumb.jpeg.2e00962cfb486aec10a4426cf741d3de.jpeg

It took the better part of 12 years to get an above ground trunk started…probably could have gotten there sooner if I watered regularly though…

9BD8C9DC-2B02-4659-BFAF-F2F0BF2869AD.thumb.jpeg.ce3173fce2f362b84e2cc418392615bf.jpeg

Bad picture but you get the idea…anyway, if all goes well this winter, I’d expect e few more inches on that trunk by end of season next year, maybe even more at the rate it’s finally growing…if you have the room and the sunlight, it’s well worth a try…it also has a nice bluish cast to it that makes it stand out from the others.

 

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