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Hybrid creation: Butia odorata x Parajubaea torallyi var. torallyi F1


Jonathan Haycock

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On the 27th December 2020 I began the process of creating this hybrid. Two inflorescence were used on the Butia, but for the purpose of this thread I won't differentiate between them as their timings were less than a week apart.

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Butia odorata

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Parajubaea torallyi var. torallyi

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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31st December 2020: Spathe opens to reveal inflorescence, which was subsequently emasculated the same day.

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Butia odorata inflorescence

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Emasculated

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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Once the inflorescence was emasculated, I sprayed it with water to wash off any unwanted pollen, then covered it with a hypoallergenic pillow protector.

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Emasculated inflorescence

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Hypoallergenic pillow protector

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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During summer of 2020-21, each emasculated inflorescence on this Butia odorata (5 in total) took exactly 11 days to reach anthesis. I used a fine soft haired paint brush and applied Parajubaea pollen to each female flower. 

Once pollination was complete, I covered the inflorescence with a hypoallergenic pillow protector and left it on for at least a couple of weeks.

Some hybridisers repeat pollination successively over 2-3 days to improve yield. I simply didn't have the time to do this so the inflorescence were pollinated just the once.

Pollen prep:

  1. Cut inflorescence from palm.
  2. Dry indoors at ambient temperature.
  3. When flowers are crispy (3-5 days), harvest them.
  4. I used a spice blender to help extract pollen from the male flowers.
  5. Blitzed male flowers were then shook over a 150 micron sieve.
  6. Material passing 150 micron is placed in an air tight plastic container along with a sachet of silica gel, then put in a freezer until required.

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Parajubaea torallyi var. torallyi inflorescence

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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25th January 2021. Hypoallergenic pillow protector removed. Infructescence left uncovered.

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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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27th February 2021. Fruits getting fat so infructescence was covered with a nylon fruit protection bag to discourage birds and vermin.

Not a single fruit aborted.

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Nylon fruit protection bag

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Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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2nd April 2021. Fruits almost full size and starting to ripen.

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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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Awesome Jonathan - looks and sounds like you did everything right and will be successful with the hybridization.  Hope the seeds are viable and you get excellent germination!

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Jon Sunder

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17th April 2021. Fruits fully ripe and harvested.

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I estimated well over 1000 fruits from the 2 infructescence. However only around 150 contained viable seeds. The remaining were just solid stones. 

Unfortunately the fruit was sour and stringy.

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Viable seed

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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I'm almost 100% positive the hybrid attempt was a success for a number of reasons, but the main one being the shear thickness of the endocarp. Far chunkier than other hybrid and pure species seed off this particular Butia odorata. I put this down to the Parajubaea parental influence, which as a species are notorious for thick endocarps.

Impossible to crack the Butia odorata x Parajubaea torallyi var. torallyi F1 seed in a vice without damaging the kernel using the conventional method. I had to cut one end with a junior hacksaw then jam a flat headed screwdriver in the cut and twist. Endocarps popped open without a single kernel damaged. 

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You can see the score marks from the junior hacksaw

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Had to sacrifice one to check for an embryo. It’s there!!!

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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Finally!!! Almost 3 months after sowing, we have germination.

They seem to need quite high temperatures to pop. 30C during the day, 22C at night. 

Baggy method with sphagnum moss inside plastic container on a thermostatically controlled heat mat.

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17th July 2021

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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Last weekend. 14 in total so far.

That's it folks. Hope you enjoyed the thread.

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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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Nice work :greenthumb:

Edited by climate change virginia
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"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
~ Neil deGrasse Tyson

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1 hour ago, Fusca said:

Awesome Jonathan - looks and sounds like you did everything right and will be successful with the hybridization.  Hope the seeds are viable and you get excellent germination!

Thanks Jon. 14 sprouts so far.

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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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28 minutes ago, climate change virginia said:

Nice work :greenthumb:

Thanks @climate change virginia.

For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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11 hours ago, Jonathan Haycock said:

I estimated well over 1000 fruits from the 2 infructescence. However only around 150 contained viable seeds. The remaining were just solid stones. 

Thanks for the very informative post!

Question...how did you know there were only 150 seeds that were viable?  

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7 hours ago, Scott W said:

Thanks for the very informative post!

Question...how did you know there were only 150 seeds that were viable?  

One gets their eye in after cracking a few and finding the smaller seeds are in fact solid endocarps absent of a kernel. 
 

It’s easy to tell which seeds are viable as they are significantly larger.

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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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Congratulations and kudos for the illustrated tutorial.

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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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3 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Congratulations and kudos for the illustrated tutorial.

Thanks Meg. 

For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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Amazing tutorial...well done. What are the advantages/characteristics you are seeking in this hybrid?

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Great job and excellent write up. Both of the parents are beauties so the offspring should be really nice :greenthumb:

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Matt in Temecula, CA

Hot and dry in the summer, cold with light frost in the winter. Halfway between the desert and ocean

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5 hours ago, GregVirginia7 said:

Amazing tutorial...well done. What are the advantages/characteristics you are seeking in this hybrid?

Cheers Greg.

It produces a gorgeous hybrid with the grace of Parajubaea and the toughness of Butia. 

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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1 hour ago, freakypalmguy said:

Great job and excellent write up. Both of the parents are beauties so the offspring should be really nice :greenthumb:

Cheers Matthew.

The Butia has quite a chunky trunk so coupled with the Parajubaea, I’m hoping to create a beautiful hybrid with monster proportions.

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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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Thanks for documenting the process and what could promise to be a hybrid for z8b and above! Please put me on the waiting list if any seedlings become available!
:greenthumb:

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Would these be tough enough to push 8A? :blush:

Also the roots look like little mushrooms :P

Edited by ZPalms
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4 hours ago, ZPalms said:

Would these be tough enough to push 8A? :blush:

Also the roots look like little mushrooms :P

I think 8a would be pushing it without some overhead protection.

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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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On 8/9/2021 at 11:36 AM, Swolte said:

Thanks for documenting the process and what could promise to be a hybrid for z8b and above! Please put me on the waiting list if any seedlings become available!
:greenthumb:

4 hours ago, knikfar said:

I'd like to be added to the waiting list for purchase also! 

Appreciate the interest, but unfortunately these won’t be available for shipping overseas.

For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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Most excellent tutorial of something I’ve wondered about the process of for years. 

I see the light now into this crazy world of palm hybrids.

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10 hours ago, NATEtures Domain said:

Most excellent tutorial of something I’ve wondered about the process of for years. 

I see the light now into this crazy world of palm hybrids.

Thanks Nate.

There’s probably more efficient/effective methods of hybridisation, but the objective for me wasn’t mass production. I simply wanted the opportunity to grow cocoid hybrids, but because they are so difficult to get hold of (especially in Australia), creating them myself was the only option. 
 

I found the process quite therapeutic and satisfying so will certainly look to create more hybrids in future. 

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For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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Kudos again on the illustration. I have this cross, perhaps 2g size just going pinate. Going to be a big palm I think. 

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11 hours ago, RJ said:

Kudos again on the illustration. I have this cross, perhaps 2g size just going pinate. Going to be a big palm I think. 

Cheers Randy.

Where did you source your BxP from? Could you post a picture of it?

For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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6 hours ago, Jonathan Haycock said:

Cheers Randy.

Where did you source your BxP from? Could you post a picture of it?

I have all three although I suspect one isn’t a successful cross (BxPj) BxPjs and BxPjt are the real deal. All three are from Partix in CA. I’ll grab a picture later today. 
 

 

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This is supposed to be BxPj but I’m not sure blades have much more V to it. More silver in color too :bummed:

image.jpg

Edited by RJ
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13 hours ago, RJ said:

BxPjs

 

 

image.jpg

This reminds me of the BxP. sunkha I used to have in UK (from Patrick Schafer). Although smaller than your example, it had the same look about it.

For those of you that frequent Facebook, I’ve set up a group called “Pommy palms”, where many of the palms I’ve seen since emigrating to Australia have been documented. If you wish to be a member, copy and paste “Pommy palms” into Facebook to view the page and click “Join group”.

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