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Northern most coconut palm tree??? Daytona beach


Jason-Palm king

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I took this pic today after lunch with the wife....this coconut palm is in south Daytona close to A1A. This must have been planted after 2010.....is this the most northern coconut ???

E58846E9-DC56-465E-BE4E-47DFAA9B13FB.jpeg

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Reeverse has posted about this palm before. This is the northernmost pre-2010 coconut in Florida.

 

For future reference, since coconuts and royals (your other thread) aren't cold hardy these two threads would be better placed in the "Discussing Palms Trees Worldwide" forum.

Edited by RedRabbit
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very cool! Ocean city Maryland likes to plant these and royals everywhere that die in Dec-Jan-Feb. Such a waste of time, money and perfectly good trees. Honestly I wish theyd just stop wasting them and plant trachys and chamerops and call it a day...at least then they wouldnt have to spend tiem and $$ replanting each spring. 

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LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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Ocean City has been doing this for decades but they used to just use Sabal Palmettos mainly.  Occasionally one or two would survive.   Now, they use far more straight tropical palms.    The biggest offender now is Secrets Jamaica USA on 49th. street.  

Take a look here on street view.  Take a short drive on you computer down this street and it looks like south Florida accept most of the palms are 25 feet or less.

Secrets Jamaica USA street view coconuts.

Also have a look at the photos that have been uploaded by visitors and others here: Photos

 

They use what appears to be HUNDREDS of mainly Coconut palms that are 25' or so tall (mature) and other palms as well.  They also just let them all die over winter.  There are photos of the place in the winter when every single tree is dead and brown with broken dead fronds hanging down.  Such a waste!.   

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1 hour ago, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

Ocean City has been doing this for decades but they used to just use Sabal Palmettos mainly.  Occasionally one or two would survive.   Now, they use far more straight tropical palms.    The biggest offender now is Secrets Jamaica USA on 49th. street.  

Take a look here on street view.  Take a short drive on you computer down this street and it looks like south Florida accept most of the palms are 25 feet or less.

Secrets Jamaica USA street view coconuts.

Also have a look at the photos that have been uploaded by visitors and others here: Photos

 

They use what appears to be HUNDREDS of mainly Coconut palms that are 25' or so tall (mature) and other palms as well.  They also just let them all die over winter.  There are photos of the place in the winter when every single tree is dead and brown with broken dead fronds hanging down.  Such a waste!.   

UNREAL. WOW!

5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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1 hour ago, Jason-Palm king said:

Where is Jamaica street USA ?

 

Jamaicy St..jpg

5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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20 hours ago, Jason-Palm king said:

Where is Jamaica street USA ?

It is not a street name.  Secrets Jamaica USA is the name of the bar/ restaurant and attached rum distillery.  It was formerly called just Secrets. Its been there for decades.  I do not know if the same company still owns it as back then or not, but what I can tell you is that the main Secrets is in Jamaica, and it is a bar/ restaurant / club and has a rum distillery.  So perhaps they either purchased this bar, or, they always owned it and they expanded it to be their USA mainland location.  It is on 49th street in Ocean City, Maryland. 

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19 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

UNREAL. WOW!

It is isn't it?  I was shocked when I first discovered it.  I know over the last decade it has become en-vogue to use more tropical palms up north, but usually those were like Queens and maybe Christmas palms.  Well apparently that has changed dramatically in the last decade to now include even more, including the Coconut.  It is all just a marketing ploy to create that oh so desirable tropical vibe where one can be 1000 miles from the nearest palm, yet still enjoy pretending to be in the actual tropics.  Nothing makes that more realistic than the Coconut Palm.  

Chicago has been doing this in sections of their lake shore for quite a few years now, maybe even a decade, especially around the famous Oak Street.  From all that I have read about it, they rent all of those huge tropical palms.  The company comes in, places them in spring after danger of temps below 45 or 50 I think, then removes them in the fall, and places them back into their very large greenhouses.  If I had the capital I would totally start a business like that in a northern climate and I bet it would do amazing.   I just very much dislike the senseless killing of so many trees every year.  With large places like that doing this more and more I would guess the numbers of palm trees that die each year from the practice number in the 10's of thousands now. :rant:

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Businesses and individuals plant perennial plants and use them as annuals all the time. Many of the common flowers in gardens across the county would be perennial in warmer climates but we use them during warm weather and let them die when it gets cold, I see things like Lantana and many others here in Ohio all the time that are perennial elsewhere. Even tomatoes, squash etc. could live for years in frost free climates. We leave them to die in cold and nobody bats an eye ever. 

Maybe its just the size of the coconuts etc. that is making everyone uncomfortable, I understand the “it’s such a waste” mentality but I’m not sure I agree. These plants provide an awesome atmosphere that customers really enjoy during those months of the year that are warm enough.  They bring value to the properties that use them through increased sales. The palm growers love selling new plams every year and it helps people keep their jobs. 

Sure it’s too bad to see them all die at the end of the season but all in all I’m not opposed to the practice. 

P.S. The “renting” idea is pretty cool

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Corpus Christi, TX, near salt water, zone 9b/10a! Except when it isn't and everything gets nuked.

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Funny this is mentioned since there was a similar? thread awhile back. Anyway, three was someone posting about Coconuts being used somewhere in Iowa in a similar fashion.

Lo and behold, when I moved to Bradenton a few years back, I ended up meeting someone who does exactly this.. and selling them acouple $k worth of palms/ tropicals from the nursery I'd just started working for not long before they made a trip to town to purchase material.

Talking with the client, he was telling me how they truck the palms out to location during season, and back to giant airplane hangers during the winter.. Great group of people and I hope the palms they picked up are still alive. 

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On 10/31/2017, 1:20:18, RedRabbit said:

Reeverse has posted about this palm before. This is the northernmost pre-2010 coconut in Florida.

 

For future reference, since coconuts and royals (your other thread) aren't cold hardy these two threads would be better placed in the "Discussing Palms Trees Worldwide" forum.

So because someone else posted about this in another thread I shouldn’t have???? Wow, I apologize for this dearly ....oh, and I am so sorry I put this under “cold hardy palms” instead of the correct one it should have been under (sarcasm) whatever dude ...you actually had time to correct me on this ??? Gimme a break 

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5 hours ago, Jason-Palm king said:

So because someone else posted about this in another thread I shouldn’t have???? Wow, I apologize for this dearly ....oh, and I am so sorry I put this under “cold hardy palms” instead of the correct one it should have been under (sarcasm) whatever dude ...you actually had time to correct me on this ??? Gimme a break 

Do whatever you please. Given your 19 posts I figured I'd just help out the new guy. 

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On 10/30/2017, 4:28:33, Jason-Palm king said:

I took this pic today after lunch with the wife....this coconut palm is in south Daytona close to A1A. This must have been planted after 2010.....is this the most northern coconut ???

E58846E9-DC56-465E-BE4E-47DFAA9B13FB.jpeg

great shot!  it barley survived 2011 but it is pre 2011

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27 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

great shot!  it barley survived 2011 but it is pre 2011

Is it really?? Didn’t know it’s that old 

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1 hour ago, Jason-Palm king said:

Is it really?? Didn’t know it’s that old 

its one of 2 known coconuts that survived 2010-2011 in daytona beach.  i think it was planted 2007 or 2008

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25 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

its one of 2 known coconuts that survived 2010-2011 in daytona beach.  i think it was planted 2007 or 2008

Wow! Where is the other one located? Do u have any pics ?

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On 11/3/2017, 1:51:10, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

It is isn't it?  I was shocked when I first discovered it.  I know over the last decade it has become en-vogue to use more tropical palms up north, but usually those were like Queens and maybe Christmas palms.  Well apparently that has changed dramatically in the last decade to now include even more, including the Coconut.  It is all just a marketing ploy to create that oh so desirable tropical vibe where one can be 1000 miles from the nearest palm, yet still enjoy pretending to be in the actual tropics.  Nothing makes that more realistic than the Coconut Palm.  

Chicago has been doing this in sections of their lake shore for quite a few years now, maybe even a decade, especially around the famous Oak Street.  From all that I have read about it, they rent all of those huge tropical palms.  The company comes in, places them in spring after danger of temps below 45 or 50 I think, then removes them in the fall, and places them back into their very large greenhouses.  If I had the capital I would totally start a business like that in a northern climate and I bet it would do amazing.   I just very much dislike the senseless killing of so many trees every year.  With large places like that doing this more and more I would guess the numbers of palm trees that die each year from the practice number in the 10's of thousands now. :rant:

 

Well technically speaking the nearest native palm strand to Ocean city isnt that far "as the crow flies". What I wihs they did was use palms that WILL survive that in my humble opinion look not only good but a unique sight. Think of larger trunking palms that never have to get dug up in Feburary, rather they just keep growing and looking magnificent! But then again that woul;d take maintenance and Lets be REAL real now...Ocean city hate plants outside of the look. They never maintain any plant as theyd rather just dig it up and start from scratch instead. Thinking about how tropical you could make it look 356 days a year for a fraction of the cost and just a little elbow grease sickens me. One of the many reasons my family always preferred the outer banks over Ocean Shi##y...

 

Just think of the needle palm or chamerops humilis shrubs everywhere and trachycarpus growing ski high! All healthy and more than hardy to survive there with just a little TLC. Drives me nuts that my wifes family is head over heels in love with the place...

Edited by mdsonofthesouth
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LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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On 11/3/2017, 8:18:42, Xerarch said:

Businesses and individuals plant perennial plants and use them as annuals all the time. Many of the common flowers in gardens across the county would be perennial in warmer climates but we use them during warm weather and let them die when it gets cold, I see things like Lantana and many others here in Ohio all the time that are perennial elsewhere. Even tomatoes, squash etc. could live for years in frost free climates. We leave them to die in cold and nobody bats an eye ever. 

Maybe its just the size of the coconuts etc. that is making everyone uncomfortable, I understand the “it’s such a waste” mentality but I’m not sure I agree. These plants provide an awesome atmosphere that customers really enjoy during those months of the year that are warm enough.  They bring value to the properties that use them through increased sales. The palm growers love selling new plams every year and it helps people keep their jobs. 

Sure it’s too bad to see them all die at the end of the season but all in all I’m not opposed to the practice. 

P.S. The “renting” idea is pretty cool

 

But if there are palms that would survive the winter and be better looking year round without the cost of renting or digging up and replanting each spring wouldnt that be a better model?

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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3 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

But if there are palms that would survive the winter and be better looking year round without the cost of renting or digging up and replanting each spring wouldnt that be a better model?

Maybe someone just needs to explain to the city/chamber of commerce/whoever that certain species are viable long-term in Ocean City. Maybe they wouldn't completely stop with the tropicals, but they may atleast sprinkle in some trachies or chamaerops, and some of the tougher sabals that survive. I would think that would help with their year-round tourism as well, though I realize it's probably more of a summer town. I am not at all familiar with that area...

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Mike in zone 6 Missouruh

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20 hours ago, pin38 said:

Maybe someone just needs to explain to the city/chamber of commerce/whoever that certain species are viable long-term in Ocean City. Maybe they wouldn't completely stop with the tropicals, but they may atleast sprinkle in some trachies or chamaerops, and some of the tougher sabals that survive. I would think that would help with their year-round tourism as well, though I realize it's probably more of a summer town. I am not at all familiar with that area...

 

I have debated just ninja planting(even thought of doing this near my house) them all over since you can easily get either species at HD. But I would assume there might be a law against that lol. Either way the right palms are readily available in our area sold as outdoor palms most of the season, so much so that my wife told me I needed to slow down AKA stop buying palms lol. This winter will determine if I buy more and go double digit plantation of palms, but never will I ever (outside my livistona chinensis perennial) plant something as fragile as a coconut for a seasonal "look". Honestly I think its a waste of money and good plants. Potted pants are the exception if you bring them in, but Im not a fan of potted plants. Mine only exist as they didn't flush early enough for me to feel comfortable planting. 

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LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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On 11/4/2017, 3:41:09, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

great shot!  it barley survived 2011 but it is pre 2011

   Apparently sometime after the pic taken on 10-30 , and 11-5-17 , the over trimmers arrived ?

Here are pics that I took on Sunday 11-5-17 of the palm .

I hadn't seen it for a while , and assumed that the missing fronds were due to Irma .

  Big bush is also missing , near the front door .  Shadows are at different angle too .

House faces South . My pic taken very close to noon , and the other pic seems to be noonish too, as 

the shadows are straight down ,  but my are displaced to the North,  as the November low Sun does , compared 

to Summer being almost straight down . .

I had already posted these pics in the other Thread in Discussing Palms World Wide .

 

38158371446_d9f0ebf768_b.jpgDunlawton Coco B 11-5-17 by Bill H, on Flickr

 

38158371446_d9f0ebf768_b.jpgDunlawton Coco B 11-5-17 by Bill H, on Flickr

 

 

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:o it looked so much nicer before

Corpus Christi, TX, near salt water, zone 9b/10a! Except when it isn't and everything gets nuked.

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38 minutes ago, Bill H2DB said:

   Apparently sometime after the pic taken on 10-30 , and 11-5-17 , the over trimmers arrived ?

Here are pics that I took on Sunday 11-5-17 of the palm .

I hadn't seen it for a while , and assumed that the missing fronds were due to Irma .

  Big bush is also missing , near the front door .  Shadows are at different angle too .

House faces South . My pic taken very close to noon , and the other pic seems to be noonish too, as 

the shadows are straight down ,  but my are displaced to the North,  as the November low Sun does , compared 

to Summer being almost straight down . .

I had already posted these pics in the other Thread in Discussing Palms World Wide .

 

38158371446_d9f0ebf768_b.jpgDunlawton Coco B 11-5-17 by Bill H, on Flickr

 

38158371446_d9f0ebf768_b.jpgDunlawton Coco B 11-5-17 by Bill H, on Flickr

 

 

Where is this coconut located ?

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This palm is at 3617 Dahlia Ave in the city of Daytona Beach Shores . That is the NE corner of Dahlia and Cardinal .

My pics ( here's another ) were taken only 7 days ( 11-5-17 )  after the stated date ( 10-30 ) on the pic at the first post in this thread .

  My pics show that the low November shadows fall on the house , while the pic in the first post has what appears to be

straight down midsummer shadows , and a large bush is missing near the front door . 

  So the date on the first post seems to be incorrect , or something .  The palm has exposure to the ocean winds , and probably

was racked pretty well by Irma .     But it's there , and that's good .

 

38214382081_db3369fda9_b.jpgDunlawton Coco 11-5-17 by Bill H, on Flickr

 

 

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The house recently sold and some of the local palm butcherers did that. I live in that neighborhood and they always come by and I chase them off. 

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22 hours ago, Reeverse said:

The house recently sold and some of the local palm butcherers did that. I live in that neighborhood and they always come by and I chase them off. 

 

I dont understand why folks enjoy butchering them. 

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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  Not to defend the Butchers , but , It's a fair chance that Hurricane Irma damaged the lower fronds. Note the Washingtonia  palms in the background . The original pic in this thread was taken long before the Storm .  Many palms in the area were wracked badly , and this palm is exposed in all directions , and to the ocean  , where this years storm winds came at their worst . The Cocos has long floppy fronds , compared to Sabals etc .  Even on the Mainland side , much damage occurred  , and the wind / salt burn was quite evident .

  Its not uniform , and trees near to each other show a lot of difference in the result of the storm .

here's a video of part of the storm effect , taken mostly on the mainland , but starting on the Beachside .

 

 

 

 

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On 11/3/2017, 8:18:42, Xerarch said:

Businesses and individuals plant perennial plants and use them as annuals all the time. Many of the common flowers in gardens across the county would be perennial in warmer climates but we use them during warm weather and let them die when it gets cold, I see things like Lantana and many others here in Ohio all the time that are perennial elsewhere. Even tomatoes, squash etc. could live for years in frost free climates. We leave them to die in cold and nobody bats an eye ever. 

Maybe its just the size of the coconuts etc. that is making everyone uncomfortable, I understand the “it’s such a waste” mentality but I’m not sure I agree. These plants provide an awesome atmosphere that customers really enjoy during those months of the year that are warm enough.  They bring value to the properties that use them through increased sales. The palm growers love selling new plams every year and it helps people keep their jobs. 

Sure it’s too bad to see them all die at the end of the season but all in all I’m not opposed to the practice. 

P.S. The “renting” idea is pretty cool

I get your point, and I partially agree with it, however,  Things like Vinca or Mandevilla, etc... are plants.   Not giant trees.   To me its like some place in south Florida importing something like mature blue spruce or quaking aspens just to create a northern effect, only to have them die in stifling heat/ humidity in the summer.  IDK maybe its just me, but I don't see mature trees as annuals / temporary plantings.     Just my opinion tho.  Clearly others have different ones on the subject.  lol   

There is a definite market for the rental thing.   I like that much better anyway.  When the trees outgrow their winter storage area, they can always be shipped back to FL or an appropriate climate, and retired , or sold as large specimens, to live out their full life.    

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On 11/6/2017, 12:18:05, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

Well technically speaking the nearest native palm strand to Ocean city isnt that far "as the crow flies". What I wihs they did was use palms that WILL survive that in my humble opinion look not only good but a unique sight. Think of larger trunking palms that never have to get dug up in Feburary, rather they just keep growing and looking magnificent! But then again that woul;d take maintenance and Lets be REAL real now...Ocean city hate plants outside of the look. They never maintain any plant as theyd rather just dig it up and start from scratch instead. Thinking about how tropical you could make it look 356 days a year for a fraction of the cost and just a little elbow grease sickens me. One of the many reasons my family always preferred the outer banks over Ocean Shi##y...

 

Just think of the needle palm or chamerops humilis shrubs everywhere and trachycarpus growing ski high! All healthy and more than hardy to survive there with just a little TLC. Drives me nuts that my wifes family is head over heels in love with the place...

I agree with you.  OC, MD was ok as a kid. It is a northern beach tho mostly.   I much prefer assateague.   The true southern beaches really don't start until VA Beach though.     I think windmills would survive OK in OC like they do in Rehoboth.  Maybe even a Sabal Palmetto in a very protected spot.   The ones in Va Beach that are a block or more away from the ocean do just fine. The exposed ones its a 50/50 crap shoot as to which ones make it.  The windmills there grow very tall too.  Butias can get pretty big away from the ocean too.  

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On 11/2/2017, 4:10:31, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

Ocean City has been doing this for decades but they used to just use Sabal Palmettos mainly.  Occasionally one or two would survive.   Now, they use far more straight tropical palms.    The biggest offender now is Secrets Jamaica USA on 49th. street.  

Take a look here on street view.  Take a short drive on you computer down this street and it looks like south Florida accept most of the palms are 25 feet or less.

Secrets Jamaica USA street view coconuts.

Also have a look at the photos that have been uploaded by visitors and others here: Photos

 

They use what appears to be HUNDREDS of mainly Coconut palms that are 25' or so tall (mature) and other palms as well.  They also just let them all die over winter.  There are photos of the place in the winter when every single tree is dead and brown with broken dead fronds hanging down.  Such a waste!.   

OH MY GOD!  That must be literally tens of thousands of dollars worth of palms and removal EVERY SINGLE YEAR.  And for what?  What a tremendous waste.  If they're that desperate for palms, at least go with a trachycarpus.  Some may actually survive, and honestly, patrons aren't going to even notice the difference between a coconut palm and a windmill palm.  Bananas are the same way - I think most people don't even know there are more than one kind of palm tree or banana tree.  That is sad.

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On 11/16/2017, 11:24:02, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

I agree with you.  OC, MD was ok as a kid. It is a northern beach tho mostly.   I much prefer assateague.   The true southern beaches really don't start until VA Beach though.     I think windmills would survive OK in OC like they do in Rehoboth.  Maybe even a Sabal Palmetto in a very protected spot.   The ones in Va Beach that are a block or more away from the ocean do just fine. The exposed ones its a 50/50 crap shoot as to which ones make it.  The windmills there grow very tall too.  Butias can get pretty big away from the ocean too.  

 

I wouldnt call it a northern beach at all. It has well over 200 growing days a year, albeit its not as humid being practically a sandbar. VA beach is an anomaly in my opinion as its surrounded by water on 3 sides and lots of artificial heat from activity much like the difference between south Tampa and north Tampa. But that aside I just wish theyd plant the right palms and actual work on their landscaping! OC is the WORST on they plants and landscaping. They seem to set it and forget it tile they pull it and plant again. When I talked to a nursery outside Salisbury about the yucca they have all over the OC and if they have any in stock, before she answered my question she grumbled about how poor they are to their plants and the utter neglect they get. 

Look coconuts and royals are pretty in their environment, but I much prefer a palmate palm for the Southeast. A mature trachycarpus thats been taken care of looks alot like a palmetto in the sunset and is bullet proof in that climate as well as needle and chamerops clumps would match the yucca gloriosa they have planted literally EVERYWHERE. At least then it would match beaches closer to us and not try and fake the real tropics...Im in OC I know its not the Caribbean and planting coconuts aint going to help me think I am!

 

12 hours ago, Anthony_B said:

OH MY GOD!  That must be literally tens of thousands of dollars worth of palms and removal EVERY SINGLE YEAR.  And for what?  What a tremendous waste.  If they're that desperate for palms, at least go with a trachycarpus.  Some may actually survive, and honestly, patrons aren't going to even notice the difference between a coconut palm and a windmill palm.  Bananas are the same way - I think most people don't even know there are more than one kind of palm tree or banana tree.  That is sad.

 

When you're a revolving door for tourism for 10 months of the year you make enough to be that silly I guess. They could save a TON by buying the right palms and taking care of them. 

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LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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On 11/19/2017, 12:21:11, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

I wouldnt call it a northern beach at all. It has well over 200 growing days a year, albeit its not as humid being practically a sandbar. VA beach is an anomaly in my opinion as its surrounded by water on 3 sides and lots of artificial heat from activity much like the difference between south Tampa and north Tampa. But that aside I just wish theyd plant the right palms and actual work on their landscaping! OC is the WORST on they plants and landscaping. They seem to set it and forget it tile they pull it and plant again. When I talked to a nursery outside Salisbury about the yucca they have all over the OC and if they have any in stock, before she answered my question she grumbled about how poor they are to their plants and the utter neglect they get. 

Look coconuts and royals are pretty in their environment, but I much prefer a palmate palm for the Southeast. A mature trachycarpus thats been taken care of looks alot like a palmetto in the sunset and is bullet proof in that climate as well as needle and chamerops clumps would match the yucca gloriosa they have planted literally EVERYWHERE. At least then it would match beaches closer to us and not try and fake the real tropics...Im in OC I know its not the Caribbean and planting coconuts aint going to help me think I am!

 

 

When you're a revolving door for tourism for 10 months of the year you make enough to be that silly I guess. They could save a TON by buying the right palms and taking care of them. 

 

 

To me OC is a more northern beach.   VA beach is a southern beach.  Its surrounded on 2 sides by water, not 3.  That warmth comes from mostly how the land is there, and that its not far from the gulf of Mexico.  Those are not artificial things, they are natural.  Same with south Tampa.  Same for Pinellas and Saint Pete, where I live.  Its surrounded by water, naturally formed that way.  We are usually 7-12 degrees warmer where I am and in Downtown St. Pete, than may places just 25 miles or so north or inland away from the water.  Im surrounded by the mouth of Tampa Bay on 3 sides.  The land I am on is about 1/2 mile out into the water, and about the length  of a football field or so wide.  Water keeps us slightly cooler during the day in summer, and warmer at night in cooler conditions.   Many of the coconuts in my area survived the 09/10 winter. 

 The other thing that makes VA beach a southern beach, is that it is the northern most area where many tropical / subtropical species are native to, and/ or will grow.  They cease to be seen north of there and are nothing more than annuals further north.   It may benefit slightly from the "heat island" of that entire area down there a little, but its mostly the water that has the moderating effect.  

I agree with your assessment of what should be used in OC.    If they did it via Rental like they do in Chicago, then id be all for that.   I guess you are right though, they probably make so many millions upon millions per year that they can afford the waste.  

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Well Virginia Beach is only like 100miles as the crow flies and less than 100 miles latitude wise from OC so its not that much closer, and the artificial I was talking about is from the naval yard and all the ship building. When I say 3 sides I was referring to how it juts out, but thats the park and not VA beach. As for south Tampa well the base is surrounded by 3 sides and Im sure puts off heat from activity as well. 

 

Im not saying OC is southern or northern, but if you had to classify it the growing period matches far south of OC. But thats beside the the main point that they could plant better, but not only will they not plant correctly they wont care for them once plantation is over. 

 

As for Daytona its really a marvel to see a coconut surviving that far north. Must be quite the micro climate at the beach there. 

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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29 minutes ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

Well Virginia Beach is only like 100miles as the crow flies and less than 100 miles latitude wise from OC so its not that much closer, and the artificial I was talking about is from the naval yard and all the ship building. When I say 3 sides I was referring to how it juts out, but thats the park and not VA beach. As for south Tampa well the base is surrounded by 3 sides and Im sure puts off heat from activity as well. 

 

Im not saying OC is southern or northern, but if you had to classify it the growing period matches far south of OC. But thats beside the the main point that they could plant better, but not only will they not plant correctly they wont care for them once plantation is over. 

 

As for Daytona its really a marvel to see a coconut surviving that far north. Must be quite the micro climate at the beach there. 

The growing season may match or closely match further south, but its cold season does not.  That is the real issue.  Va beach is substantially warmer than OCMD, largely due to the ocean / bay/ james river / Gulfstream.   The ship building is all in Norfolk/ Hampton/ Newport News.  20+ miles up river / west.  Norfolk is 20 miles or so west.  Its a small city.  VA Beach isnt large enough to give off a heat island.  Its mostly the seaside town and the surrounding largely suburban area and Naval Base (NAS Oceana).   It just doesn't  get a brutally cold, and when it does its usually sort lived.   50's/ 60's in the dead of winter during the day are common there. Even 70's are not that uncommon.    Where it not for the night cooling that occurs in winter, VA Beach could easily be an 8B.  those pesky overnight winter lows tho wont allow for that even though its climate is fairly warm compared to mos areas  near by and north just a bit.  

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OC is definitely milder than even inland VA and MD. Almost feels Mediterranean in comparison to our humid subtropic. For instance one year we were there and the peak temps were high 80s maybe low 90s and easy humidity while back home it was peaking at 105+ and deadly humidity. The swing of temps when I travel home to the Piedmont from OC the humidity and temps always significantly rise. But the winter is mild as can be in OC. But yes being 100 miles south does help! The best we can see up here in MD is Crisfield. I wish somebody would grow some palmettos out there!

 

But lets be honest most of MD, VA and DE typically only have brief periods of bad cold (very subjective).  

Edited by mdsonofthesouth
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LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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What I'm curious about is whether this coconut palm is exceptional or lucky.  Has anybody tried growing its coconuts?  

In this thread I shared this Google street view of a strand of coconut palms in Baja California.  I'm guessing that the primary limiting factor is the dryness rather than the cold (or lack of heat).

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