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Queen after first winter in Virginia


SEVA
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On 11/12/2017, 7:43:07, PalmTreeDude said:

@SEVA Great to see the palms come back! They look really good. Did you put the Spanish Moss in the trees or did it just end up there?

It grows naturally here, but I placed it in areas of the yard where it was not previously present.

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21 hours ago, SEVA said:

It grows naturally here, but I placed it in areas of the yard where it was not previously present.

 

Wow Only specimens I have heard of in Virginia werent that big. Where does it grow naturally and not have trouble in winter? Id only assume south of Poquoson but thats just a guess. 

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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40 minutes ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

Wow Only specimens I have heard of in Virginia werent that big. Where does it grow naturally and not have trouble in winter? Id only assume south of Poquoson but thats just a guess. 

Spanish Moss grows as far east in VA as Isle of Wight. I have seen some near the Great Dismal Swamp area in Virginia, but it was just a few clumps here and there. Then you get to first landing state park and it is everywhere!

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PalmTreeDude

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4 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Spanish Moss grows as far east in VA as Isle of Wight. I have seen some near the Great Dismal Swamp area in Virginia, but it was just a few clumps here and there. Then you get to first landing state park and it is everywhere!

 

 

I would think that state park has the most mild climate in the whole state with water on almost all sides in the warmest part of the state. I have heard of folks finding sickly specimens growing in Delmarva. 

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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On 11/19/2017, 1:48:39, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

 

I would think that state park has the most mild climate in the whole state with water on almost all sides in the warmest part of the state. I have heard of folks finding sickly specimens growing in Delmarva. 

There are some, I heard that at the southern tip there can be some nice clumps growing, but once you get near Eastville it starts to not look as good, and North of that is where the it stops growing. The state park certainly has the biggest population, it isn't like the more inland areas of its range where there are a few clumps here or there, it is just everywhere there!

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PalmTreeDude

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First Landing state park is the most northern place in the United States that Spanish Moss is native to and grows.  It is not recognises anywhere else as there have been no  proven documented colonies.  That is not to say there may not be small populations somewhere or that it never grew a bit further north.   If you have never seen the population there, in places it looks very reminiscent of South Carolina in the park.  There is a lot of it in places and it thrives.    I too have seen bits here and there even as far inland as Isle of Wight, and in the great dismal Swamp, but just small bits / clumps and it has not spread out much.  

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  • 4 weeks later...

Here is the queen palm a few days after a night of 24°F, which is the coldest it has been so far this fall/winter.  There is some browning on the tips of the fronds.  We are forecasted to have temperatures in the upper teens this weekend.

20171218_110625.jpg

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  • 3 months later...

@SEVA You have inspired me to try to grow coconuts, queens and Bismarckias in North Carolina! 

 

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Zone 8a Greenville, NC 

Zone 8b/9a Bluffton, SC

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This thread has inspired me as well. I went out and obtained a little queen palm yesterday. I think it already knows it is in trouble. haha.

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On 4/8/2018, 6:15:27, NC_Palms said:

@SEVA You have inspired me to try to grow coconuts, queens and Bismarckias in North Carolina! 

 

Lol

5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Not very pretty, but here it is.  Photo taken today. 

20180507_124935.jpg

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I accidentally cooked the majesty a bit. Hopefully I can get it through the next winter without losing fronds.

20180507_205504.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/15/2018, 6:49:16, frienduvafrond said:

This thread has inspired me as well. I went out and obtained a little queen palm yesterday. I think it already knows it is in trouble. haha.

I know about some people who grow queen palms in the Raleigh area. With substantial cover in winter, the palms do pretty well. 

Zone 8a Greenville, NC 

Zone 8b/9a Bluffton, SC

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  • 3 months later...

The newest frond snapped from high winds produced by a storm cell in the outer bands of hurricane Florence.

20180914_094956.jpg

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  • 2 months later...

It looks so sad and forlorn with all the snow on it.  I hope it survives for you again.  How many new fronds did it push out this warm season?   As for the snapped new frond, Queens seem to be prone to that with high winds, or at least some do.  Ive seen it quite a few times down here.  I wish that they were not as widely used here because too often they're placed in spaces where they don't do well and are also neglected, and just look like crap.  Then there are the ones that are placed properly in the right soil conditions and taken care of and they look like totally different trees and are gorgeous!   Good luck this winter!  Look forward to seeing how it does!  

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On 12/10/2018, 11:07:24, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

It looks so sad and forlorn with all the snow on it.  I hope it survives for you again.  How many new fronds did it push out this warm season?   As for the snapped new frond, Queens seem to be prone to that with high winds, or at least some do.  Ive seen it quite a few times down here.  I wish that they were not as widely used here because too often they're placed in spaces where they don't do well and are also neglected, and just look like crap.  Then there are the ones that are placed properly in the right soil conditions and taken care of and they look like totally different trees and are gorgeous!   Good luck this winter!  Look forward to seeing how it does!  

I think it is/was working on it's 5th full frond, but I'm sure growth has slowed almost to a stop by now.  I will only be wrapping it with burlap and lights this winter, so we'll see what happens.  I don't expect it to survive much longer, especially with yearly defoliation.  I think I'd rather replace it with a palm more appropriate for this climate.  It's been a nice little experiment though. 

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32 minutes ago, SEVA said:

I think it is/was working on it's 5th full frond, but I'm sure growth has slowed almost to a stop by now.  I will only be wrapping it with burlap and lights this winter, so we'll see what happens.  I don't expect it to survive much longer, especially with yearly defoliation.  I think I'd rather replace it with a palm more appropriate for this climate.  It's been a nice little experiment though. 

If it makes it, next august sell it to someone in FL and ship it out so it will live!  Poor thing.  LOL 

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On 12/13/2018, 6:59:52, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

If it makes it, next august sell it to someone in FL and ship it out so it will live!  Poor thing.  LOL 

I guess I should've said I'll replace it once it dies. Lol.  I don't think I could remove it while it's still alive.  I'm interested to see how long it'll survive.  The issue I have with wrapping the fronds is mold.  I'm not optimistic, but I wish I could prevent defoliation.  Maybe this will be the year.

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  • 1 month later...
On 12/15/2018 at 2:12 PM, SEVA said:

I guess I should've said I'll replace it once it dies. Lol.  I don't think I could remove it while it's still alive.  I'm interested to see how long it'll survive.  The issue I have with wrapping the fronds is mold.  I'm not optimistic, but I wish I could prevent defoliation.  Maybe this will be the year.

The key to get rid of moisture is have a outside shell made of fencing then covered in 1.5 dewitt frost cloth with a top then staked down.  Inside use breathable fabrics (synthetic cheap sleeping bags) mini lights and your thermocube and a temp sensor.  No plastic.  You can also do it without the 'shell' if you apply multi layers of frost cloth and wrap so water can't sit but instead runs down.   the frost cloth is really breathable and almost waterproof in 2 or more layers as the outside layer runs down most water.

 

Small one is shell 

IMG_1209.JPG

second is 10' tall method without shell but a post run up trunk with a top.  Very breathable.

IMG_2146.JPG

Edited by Allen
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YouTube (TN Tropics) 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), louisiana(5), palmetto (1)  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows -1F, 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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On 2/9/2019 at 4:50 PM, Rd003 said:

Any updates on the queen from the dead of winter?

 

I have not seen it recently.  It was still green the last time I saw it in early January.  I'm sure the fronds are fried, but assuming the thermocube and lights kept working, the meristem/ trunk should still be alive.  It's been a pretty mild winter so far, and the lowest temperature this winter (according to my weather app) was 15°F.

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  • 2 months later...

Well, I didn't get the chance to wrap the fronds (just trunk) this past winter so they fried as expected.  Unfortunately, I've had very little time since I started grad school.  Fortunately, I was able to visit for just a day this past weekend and took a few photos of various plants.  I know it doesn't look like it, but the queen is pushing new growth. I'll try to take a close up of the emerging frond this weekend.  The needle palm in the foreground is one I planted last fall (it was on clearance and very dry at time of purchase).

20190417_000957.jpg

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Camellia japonica beside my largest (and oldest) Rhapidophyllum hystrix.

20190407_184026.jpg

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What about this? It was near the Sabal Birminghams, which I will post below. 

20190414_110805.jpg

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This Sabal Birmingham had most of its fronds chewed off.  The other 2 only had 1 or 2 fronds bitten off.  They all have cages around them now. 

20190417_003421.jpg

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56 minutes ago, SEVA said:

Same frog (and palm), anyone know the species?

20190413_213201.jpg

Not 100%  certain but closest matches i could find were either a young Spring Peeper, Pseudacris crucifer, lacking the distinctive X across the back ..or Upland Chorus Frog, Pseudacris feriarum ..though it's my understanding that most Chorus Frog sp. tend to stay closer to the ground / don't climb much. Snout seems a little shorter than what pictures of the sp. i could find online. Lacks many of the darker markings seen in many pictures as well. Doesn't look like any young Grey, Green or Squirrel Tree frogs i remember capturing for study when i lived in Kansas, Ohio, or Florida.     Look over the "Frogs and Toads of Virginia"  page and see what you think. 

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19 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Not 100%  certain but closest matches i could find were either a young Spring Peeper, Pseudacris crucifer, lacking the distinctive X across the back ..or Upland Chorus Frog, Pseudacris feriarum ..though it's my understanding that most Chorus Frog sp. tend to stay closer to the ground / don't climb much. Snout seems a little shorter than what pictures of the sp. i could find online. Lacks many of the darker markings seen in many pictures as well. Doesn't look like any young Grey, Green or Squirrel Tree frogs i remember capturing for study when i lived in Kansas, Ohio, or Florida.     Look over the "Frogs and Toads of Virginia"  page and see what you think. 

Thanks.  I'm not sure myself.  After looking through the list, I was thinking maybe a pine woods tree frog (Hyla femoralis) since their color can vary.  I'm not sure though, since I can't see the dots on the rear of thigh.  I'll have to keep looking. 

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47 minutes ago, SEVA said:

Thanks.  I'm not sure myself.  After looking through the list, I was thinking maybe a pine woods tree frog (Hyla femoralis) since their color can vary.  I'm not sure though, since I can't see the dots on the rear of thigh.  I'll have to keep looking. 

If it wasn't for the first pic. you'd posted, showing the more solid yellow coloration to the back of the legs, i would have thought the same / added it to the list of potential matches..   I wish some of the various state Herp guides would include more  pictures of such details of Frogs / Toads more often.   Even frog butts can help id a species, lol..

Looked over Virginia's list of Turtle sp. to try and help id the one you'd posted, but at that age, there were like 5 or 6 possible matches..

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