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Pal Meir

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On the occasion of the first pinnate leaf :greenthumb::) of my N°1401 I open a new thread for this only little known species Lytocaryum insigne TOLEDO 1944 (now again Syagrus insignis BECC. 1916, former Cocos insignis MART. 1854 and Glaziova insignis DRUDE 1881)

Please post your pics of L insigne here, too! It doesn’t matter if they are in pots, in gardens, or (best of all) in habitat.

I begin with my oldest baby N°1401, born 2014-02-14 during the cold winter in Germany, grown up together with nine other siblings, out of which six emigrated into other European countries, so that at my place now are remaining still four plants: N°1401, 1402, 1404, and 1408. Here comes the biggest one, about 1 m high (without pot; the split leaf was damaged by wind, it is not bifid):

57952af69aee4_N14012016-07-24IMG_8849.th

And here all 10 siblings still together in their kindergarten: :D

57952e7c8dfb2_N1401-102014IMG_8057.thumb

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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The other three siblings are still very shy because they don’t have any signs of pinnate leaves. Actually they didn’t want to be posted here, but as there are no photos by other PTs yet I’ll place one pic here. All three are quite tall and very slender with their undivided long juvenile leaves:

57968e8941547_N140204082016-07-25P102035

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Very nice Pal!

Larry Shone in wet and sunny north-east England!  Zone9 ish

Tie two fish together and though they have two tails they cannot swim <>< ><>

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5 minutes ago, Kai said:

Any Lytocaryum thread is awesome! When I get home I will post some pictures of my insignes, including the largest one which also has decided to go pinnate. I wonder where that plant came from...:rolleyes:

Look forward to seeing them!

Larry Shone in wet and sunny north-east England!  Zone9 ish

Tie two fish together and though they have two tails they cannot swim <>< ><>

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To contribute to this topic I shall tell you about my experiences with Lytocaryum insigne and start at the very beginning.

To make a long story short, I moved to a small appartment in 2011 and had to leave my palm collection mainly to other palmnuts I knew. In 2012 me and my wife bought a nice house and I believe somewhere in October 2012 I received an email from RPS that I had won 50 euro's worth of seeds of choice. This was the moment that I started building up my new and improved palm collection and my first order (containing Lytocaryum insigne) was a fact. Free seeds! Yeay!

The seeds took maybe 2 months to germinate at room temperature, no special treatment and 100% (30 out of 30) germination was soon reached.

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I potted up the seeds in deep palmsleeves and used an organic soil mix that I had used many times before with Lytocaryum weddellianum with great succes.

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The first year growth was good and looked healthy but after some time the seedlings started looking less healthy, but I had no idea what was wrong...

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Finally I learned from Pal that these soil mixes are too organic for this species, he explained this to me with examples from the natural habitat of the species. Soon after I repotted the dying seedlings in a mix identical to Pal's mix (seramis with fine pinebark chips). There was not much root material left to put in the pots, but I had noting to lose. The plants were as good as dead...I thought. They are now maybe 2 months in their new mix and I have observed new growth with healthier leaf coloration. The dark glossy green is returning on the new leafs. It will take some time for them to look their best though but they will be nurtured continuously.

Many seedlings I gave away before I knew they would start declining and one of the seedlings went to my uncle. My uncle has some peculiar ways of caring for his plants but somehow it always works out pretty well. His insigne seedling was placed on a window sil in a drafty stairway of his house and the little pot was allowed to dry out completely frequently. There was great interval of time between waterings. And surprise...the seedling looks much better than mine, even with the organic soil around its rooots. A few weeks ago my uncle complained to me that the little seedling wasn't growing very fast and asked me to try to fix it. I carefully repotted the plant into the seramis mix and immediately a new leaf spike showed up.

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Only a few weeks ago I had the great honour to meet Pal in the flesh and we had a good conversation about palms, amongst other sciency subjects. Pal brought me a Lytocaryum itapebiense, his #5 if I'm not mistaking and therewith completing my Lytocaryum collection. I thought I could not be happier but my head almost exploded with joy when I saw he also brought me one of his superbly grown insignes.

For comparison, Pal's insignes and mine came from the same batch of seeds at the same time in 2014... Choosing the right soil mix is thát important! I certainly underestimated that.

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www.facebook.com/#!/Totallycoconuts

Amsterdam,

The Netherlands

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Glad of having got a new thread N°1401 is showing today the tip of a new (= 11th) leaf which may become completely (?) pinnate. :D The number of leaflets on each side of the 10th leaf has grown to ten. — @Alberto How do your two fantastic looking L insigne do?

5798c5d5bead9_N14012016-07-27P1020375.th

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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1 hour ago, Pal Meir said:

Getting pinnate … slowly :asleep:, but constantly … :indifferent:

579de8e715e80_N14012016-07-31P1020411.th

Beautiful...

i will post my 1-2 leaves seedling soon...

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The leaflets (pinnae) of the 10th leaf are up to 33 cm long and 17 mm wide, but according to Noblick & Lorenzi 2010, p. 11 they are only 24-30 cm long and 9-15 mm wide … :huh: (The photo was taken today at noon on a German »summer« day, not at midnight. :bemused:)

57a495a7700a0_N14012016-08-05IMG_8878.th

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Pal certainly is the undisputed container grower of Lytocaryum. Grown perfectly. 

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Len

Vista, CA (Zone 10a)

Shadowridge Area

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are."

-- Alfred Austin

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4 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

The leaflets (pinnae) of the 10th leaf are up to 33 cm long and 17 mm wide, but according to Noblick & Lorenzi 2010, p. 11 they are only 24-30 cm long and 9-15 mm wide … :huh: (The photo was taken today at noon on a German »summer« day, not at midnight. :bemused:)

57a495a7700a0_N14012016-08-05IMG_8878.th

Noon? Are you sure??? 

I love your german summers!:floor:

 

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15 minutes ago, Monòver said:

Noon? Are you sure??? 

I love your german summers!:floor:

I’ve forgotten what a real summer might be … :badday:< This is a pic of this year’s summer here.

One hour later I was lucky and could take a pic without flash: :lol:

57a4da6dd782e_N14012016-08-05P1020466.th

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Looks like my iPad (or fat fingers) removed the "e" and added the "not". I fixed it. 

Len

Vista, CA (Zone 10a)

Shadowridge Area

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are."

-- Alfred Austin

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On 22.8.2016, 12:35:56, dalmatiansoap said:

Doing good now!

:greenthumb:

Looking very healthy and strong! And the newest leaf has a very nice deep green colour. :greenthumb::)

Whereas the other three L insigne (which are pushing only very long juvenile leaves) are still in Ø14.8xH17.4 cm pots, the biggest palm N°1401 got repotted again (after only 55 days), this time in a deeper pot with 18x18xH23 cm inner size (when I took this photo today the temps on the balcony were 36°C :D):

57bdc1d77e342_N14010204082016-08-24P1020

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Close-up of leaf #11 from another angle:

57c051813285b_N14012016-08-26IMG_8973.th

It is like a miracle, but summer came back to Germany even if only for a couple days B). But that was enough to cause sunburn on some juvenile leaves with the exception of those leaves which had a bluish waxy protection:

57c051b7d8d8c_N14082016-08-26P1020640.th

57c051bccf8a8_N14022016-08-26P1020643.th

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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All features I could observe at my four L insigne fit to the descriptions of this species as published e.g. by Noblick & Lorenzi 2010 and others, but only the size of the strap-leaves and the pinnae of the latest leaves don’t match: They are much too long and too wide, they are too big, also compared to other pics available in the www.

57c9f1861f571_N140204082016-09-02IMG_900

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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11 minutes ago, Josh76 said:

I'm still waiting for my first pinnate leaf but the plant seems happy and grows slowly but steadily...

It is the same with my other three palms N°1402, 04, and 08: no pinnae yet. :( The palms N°1401 (mine) and N°1405 (Kai’s) had the broadest leaves, and the palm N°1407 (Ante’s) had obviously the best weather (= real summer) in Dalmatia.

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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  • 2 weeks later...

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