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Anyone Got Pictures of zone 8+ Palms In Zone 7 or Below?


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Anyone have pictures of zone 8+ palms in zones 7 or lower? Please post them here!

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Brahea armata just planted at a customer's home in Amarillo, TX 6b/7a.  He also has a needle and a mature windmill.  

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39 minutes ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Brahea armata just planted at a customer's home in Amarillo, TX 6b/7a.  He also has a needle and a mature windmill.  

IMG_2651.jpg

Wow, I worry about my Armata making it if we ever experience a true 8A winter. How is it going to survive a borderline zone 7 winter? Can they endure that type of cold?

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Armata is at least a 7b palm. He will protect the armata until it is trunking at which time i will know for sure just how cold hardy armata really are. I have one of these planted at my parents home just south of oklahoma city. 

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I am living in the northern suburbs of Atlanta, which according to the 1990 USDA zone map places my location in 7b, the 2012 zone map did do some shifting and places my location on the border of 7b and 8a. There are quite a few palms that thrive in the area with Trachycarpus by far being the most common. However, I do occasionally come across palms which would be considered zone 8 and above. Here are some examples of palms I have seen thriving in our climate:

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  This is an example of the usual Trachycarpus, but beneath is also a saw palmetto, which I believe is often categorized as zone 8, but I do also see it categorized as 7b.

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Another photo of two different plants of these types in the same area.

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  This is also a pindo palm, which is actually in a planting of three pindos near to a car wash in the area. These palms have been thriving here for some years. I have seen some pindo palms fail in this area while others make it, and these are the most impressive specimens I have been able to find.

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This is a Sago which in some locations of our area behaves like a deciduous plant, losing the majority if not all of its leaves in the winter to be replaced with a new set the following year. This particular specimen grows downhill in a shaded area beneath large trees.

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This is the same Sago photographed this summer, with the new set of leaves on display.

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These are some Sagos in a more sunnier, warmer spot. They appear to retain their leaves throughout the winter. These are also located in front of a shopping center.

I am also aware of a few Sabal Palmetto that are growing in the area, although they are really touchy for this location and some do succumb to the cold and die, although some seem to continue to thrive. It would appear that slight differences or maybe even individual plant characteristics can play a big part of their ability to grow here. I haven't got any photos of them but next time I am in the area I will take some to share.

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It seems odd that sabal palmetto die but butia survive as Sabal palmetto is much more cold hardy than any butia. Unlike palmetto, Butia is not a 7b palm.

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I'm in borderline zone 8a/b but have two zone 10 palms in my yard. One is a Phoenix Roebelini which was unscathed last winter with the help of a heated greenhouse but probably could have survived on its own with some damage since we only had one night of 25F. Hopefully this winter is another mild one.

And I also planted a Ravenea Rivularis early this spring and plan to use the same greenhouse protection for it this winter. So far it is growing very well in an area of my yard that only gets about two hours of direct sunlight each day.

 

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8 hours ago, nitsua0895 said:

I'm in borderline zone 8a/b but have two zone 10 palms in my yard. One is a Phoenix Roebelini which was unscathed last winter with the help of a heated greenhouse but probably could have survived on its own with some damage since we only had one night of 25F. Hopefully this winter is another mild one.

And I also planted a Ravenea Rivularis early this spring and plan to use the same greenhouse protection for it this winter. So far it is growing very well in an area of my yard that only gets about two hours of direct sunlight each day.

 

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The Phoenix is a 9b palm, so that will help you...

Ben Rogers

On the border of Concord & Clayton in the East Bay hills - Elev 387 ft 37.95 °N, 121.94 °W

My back yard weather station: http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/hdfForecast?query=37.954%2C-121.945&sp=KCACONCO37

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Here in Albuquerque I have been growing a Filibusta since about 2006.  It survived (barely) the winter of 2011 when we got down to -6 with a high of +5 (all in Fahrenheit).  This year I have planted a few other palms to see how they do.

I am having trouble putting the photos here.  I will do it from my laptop.

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I bought two sabal palms this year as I've been wanting to try them out. The first is a Sabal palmetto 'Birmingham' which is growing in a warm microclimate next to my block wall. It is supposedly very hardy down into zone 7. The second is a Sabal uresana. At the Albuquerque Botanical Garden there used to be 2 of these palms which survived the winters unscathed in their location. Unfortunately they were both overgrown by some Arizona Rosewood bushes the planted right next to them, so now only one survives (barely) and is in the deep shade of this large evergreen hedge... I wish they'd remove the rosewoods and let the palm be! The palm is over 15 years old now and would be impressive if it hadn't been deprived of light.

I am technically a zone 7b, although most years my lows fall in the 10-15 degree range, with some years being down to 15-19 degrees.  If you would call this a zone 8 then it must be stressed that it is a very COLD zone 8 unlike in the east. We average over 100 nights with frost, so even though the days normally warm up above freezing any plants living here must contend with many hours below 32 degrees each year and an occasional deep freeze. 

 

Sabal palmetto 'Birmingham':

 

 

S_Palmetto_Birmingham 7_25_16.JPG

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Since last winter was so nice (a little bit of frigid weather in late December) I decided to try a Butia capitata. We will see how this does. It is not in the best location (no ultra warm microclimate), but I will protect it with its own little greenhouse for the winter months. What do you guys think? Will it survive a very cold 8a winter-climate with long, hot, sun-drenched summers?

 

B_Capitata_7_25_16.JPG

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And lastly a Phoenix canariensis. I absolutely love the look of these palms, in spite of the super sharp spines on them. I got a good deal on this palm at Lowe's this spring so I decided, "what the hell!".   This one will definitely be protected and is easy enough to do while it is still so small (from a 5 gallon plant). Anyone else in Albuquerque going to try, or has tried, one of these?  I've seen several in Las Cruces area although there are no mature ones. There are even some down there that survived that same awful winter (when it got down to -5 there with between +5 to +10F during the day). I am not sure what protection they received but hey, I'm all for global warming if it helps my palms look luxurious.

 

Also, please ignore the weeds in my backyard, I'm not a sprayer and have gotten a bit behind. But the nightshade will have to go at some point.

 

P_Canariensis_7_25_16.JPG

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5 hours ago, Ben in Norcal said:

The Phoenix is a 9b palm, so that will help you...

Yeah, 9b. And if it was outside with 25F, it would have looked pretty roasted. 

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5 hours ago, ChrisA said:

Since last winter was so nice (a little bit of frigid weather in late December) I decided to try a Butia capitata. We will see how this does. It is not in the best location (no ultra warm microclimate), but I will protect it with its own little greenhouse for the winter months. What do you guys think? Will it survive a very cold 8a winter-climate with long, hot, sun-drenched summers?

 

B_Capitata_7_25_16.JPG

If you keep palm dry during winter it will be good.I'm living in wetter climate zone 7 with less sun hours per year and have this palm for six yesrs outside with little help but no supplement heat.

[img width=675 height=1200]http://i1252.photobucket.com/albums/hh562/henoh/20160415_122710_zps0zjty67k.jpg

[img width=675 height=1200]http://i1252.photobucket.com/albums/hh562/henoh/20160415_122818_zpslydgfcuk.jpg

[img width=675 height=1200]http://i1252.photobucket.com/albums/hh562/henoh/20160415_122643_zpscj7qd5qu.jpg

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1 hour ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Trachyarpus palms planted at calf pasture beach in connecticut zone 7a.

IMG_4695.jpg

How long have these been outside?

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21 hours ago, ChrisA said:

Okay, here be the photos:

 

Washingtonia filibusta about 10 feet tall at the tallest frond:

 

Filifera 7_25_16.JPG

Looking good Chris!  Filibusta hybrids are really great palms for here... Where did you obtain that palm?  My once called filifera.. my largest which is now known as a robustifera ?? (ha!) came from southern new mexico with 3 feet of trunk. It survived the cold in 2011.. but I would say if it was any colder than that it would have been a gonner.. it recovered ok during the following summer but for being a hybrid its growth is on the meaty side so its slower (which also points to filifera).  The hybrids are different depending on the parent tree.. so to be technical.. a filifera x robusta and a robusta x fillifera would have differences...and along with that there is a chance that my palm could be a true filibusta... and yours may be a robustifera.  Confusing !

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21 hours ago, ChrisA said:

And lastly a Phoenix canariensis. I absolutely love the look of these palms, in spite of the super sharp spines on them. I got a good deal on this palm at Lowe's this spring so I decided, "what the hell!".   This one will definitely be protected and is easy enough to do while it is still so small (from a 5 gallon plant). Anyone else in Albuquerque going to try, or has tried, one of these?  I've seen several in Las Cruces area although there are no mature ones. There are even some down there that survived that same awful winter (when it got down to -5 there with between +5 to +10F during the day). I am not sure what protection they received but hey, I'm all for global warming if it helps my palms look luxurious.

 

Also, please ignore the weeds in my backyard, I'm not a sprayer and have gotten a bit behind. But the nightshade will have to go at some point.

 

 

I saw those at Lowes this year...  I almost got one!  I think getting past the establishment period would be the challenge as it takes a few years... I would say keep it moist to wet as much as possible to keep the roots growing. They are such massive palms the cold most likely wont be a problem.. but the leaf damage will be.  Xmas lights might help that?

 

Good to see you are growing a Butia..  should be a fairly solid plant when they get size on them.  I have 2 in microclimates that are doing well. Have you seen the Butia X Jubaea hybrids?   Supposed to be a tad hardier.  I agree it is.. from what I observe... might be just right for our climate.

 

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I have recently been to the botanical gardens in Atlanta as well, and there they do have some zone 8 palms growing in the area. Again, the Atlanta area is labeled as 7b and sometimes 8a.

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This is an example of one of the many Sabal Palmettos which grow in the garden. I am unaware if they do provide any form of winter protection, but there are a few examples of them growing in various locations throughout the garden. The above photo is the best looking example I could find which is located next to a heated green house and a pathway. 

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Another example of S.Palmetto. 

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In this photo two more S.Palmetto are to see as well as many S.Minor.

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Here is an example of a Pindo Palm growing in the gardens. It is in a similar location as the first example of the S.Palmetto.

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Another shot of the same Pindo Palm.

I think the location of these touchy specimens is very important for this area. As is the first 2-3 years as the palms establish. In a good micro-climate, the palms seem to thrive quite well and I know these palms have been thriving in these areas for many years. 


Cheers!
 

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On 7/24/2016, 11:26:19, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

It seems odd that sabal palmetto die but butia survive as Sabal palmetto is much more cold hardy than any butia. Unlike palmetto, Butia is not a 7b palm.

Both the S.Palmetto and Butia are touchy for the area, but some seem to do better than others. It may be individual plant characteristics, but I think it comes down to how they are established and the location they are in. Places in an optimal location or micro-climate, they seem to be able to thrive. 

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16 hours ago, GeorgiaPalms said:

Both the S.Palmetto and Butia are touchy for the area, but some seem to do better than others. It may be individual plant characteristics, but I think it comes down to how they are established and the location they are in. Places in an optimal location or micro-climate, they seem to be able to thrive. 

Thanks for the photos, GeorgiaPalms. It's interesting because Atlanta and where I live seem almost identical as far as weather and Atlanta is just a tad bit more south, yet the "palm culture" in Atlanta is very sparse, almost non-existent. It's good to see they have some specimens at the botanical gardens; and don't they have some at the zoo?

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12 hours ago, smithgn said:

Thanks for the photos, GeorgiaPalms. It's interesting because Atlanta and where I live seem almost identical as far as weather and Atlanta is just a tad bit more south, yet the "palm culture" in Atlanta is very sparse, almost non-existent. It's good to see they have some specimens at the botanical gardens; and don't they have some at the zoo?

Yeah, we are just a bit farther from the coast here and not in the coastal plains but in the piedmont. There are actually quite a few palms in and around Atlanta. Piedmont Park has quite a few Trachycarpus, and they are not uncommon to see in residential areas. There are also quite a few around Inman Park located in front of some houses, some specimens that are really quite tall and old. The most popular and most common palms for the area are the Trachycarpus, by far. The S.Palmetto and Butias are not common at all, and I only know of a few examples of each in the area, but there very well could be some I have missed. I also do see S.Minor, R.Hystrix and some saw palmettos like in the photo I posted on my previous post. There seem to be more palms showing up in commercial zoned plantings, which is quite nice and breaks away from the overly used crape myrtles. There very well may be some at the zoo, I haven't been there in many years so I am uncertain. I moved here from Jacksonville Beach FL back in 1998 when I was a child.

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I am going to be attempting to grow Sabal palmetto at my place in zone 7b VA this winter. Hmmm, maybe once I get then established I could then keep reducing the protection every year to none. I would protect them if there was a winter storm or something like that though.

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PalmTreeDude

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1 hour ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Queen palms near the Niantic/Waterford Line in southern Connecticut.

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Cool! They are starting to plant queen palms at Virginia Beach as well.

 

 

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PalmTreeDude

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Lol!  Queens stand no chance in Connecticut!  I like the lights though. 

 

Thanks Sailor!  That Robustifera/filibusta was purchased at a nursery in Phoenix back in 2007 if I remember correctly.  It's had very little protection aside from siting and has occasionally lost all fronds, such as in 2011 (which, like yours, nearly killed it).

 

im excited about the Butia (Henoh, yours looks GREAT!), and would like to see a few very mild winters to let my new palms get more established before some reality sets in.  I know the Canary Island is a pipe-dream and that it will need consistent protection unless global warming steps it up a bit more quickly. I don't think they will ever become tolerant to frigid temps, even once mature.  I've seen large specimens completely burnt in Sierra Vista, AZ which is quite a bit warmer than Albuquerque. So I am hoping to enjoy it for a few years if possible. Again it was only about $20 so it wasn't a huge investment.

 

Henoh, what temps do you normally see in the winter in your zone 7 climate?  And what kind of Sycamores are those in the background?

 

SailorBold, I have heard of the Butia-Jubaea crossed but am afraid I don't have anymore room for more experimenting! (How's that possible?) I still have to find a nice spot for my Trachycarpus! 

 

Enjoy the the rest of summer! Y'all!

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My place in VA is 7b and the lowest I have EVER seen was 7 degrees F. 

 

Here are the Queens at Virginia Beach (8a) 

 

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PalmTreeDude

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1 hour ago, PalmTreeDude said:

My place in VA is 7b and the lowest I have EVER seen was 7 degrees F. 

 

Here are the Queens at Virginia Beach (8a) 

 

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these definatly wont survive the winter.  they are only hardy to southern georgia coast and south.

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11 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

I am going to be attempting to grow Sabal palmetto at my place in zone 7b VA this winter. Hmmm, maybe once I get then established I could then keep reducing the protection every year to none. I would protect them if there was a winter storm or something like that though.

That sounds like a good idea and I am curious to see how it will turn out for you. It seems the first couple years are the most important and they seem susceptible to issues within that period. 

I don't know if you have seen this article before,

https://subtropicalmemphis.wordpress.com/2015/04/30/long-term-sabal-palmetto-in-memphis-tn/

 

It is an interesting post about S.Palmetto in Memphis, TN. They're also zone 7 I believe.

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7 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

My place in VA is 7b and the lowest I have EVER seen was 7 degrees F. 

 

Here are the Queens at Virginia Beach (8a) 

 

IMG_1438.JPG

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These queens won't make it at all. I'm 8b and still have to drive 170 miles south towards houston before seeing a queen that was planted more than 4 years ago. They are a 9a palm at best.

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