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Lytocaryum weddellianum (Syagrus weddelliana) grown up


Kai

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Almost 10 years ago, in 2006, I received some Lytocaryum weddellianum seeds in my mailbox. I just had to grow this species because when I was a kid I once had a small seedling and had grown attached to it for the short time it lived. As an 8-year old I simply overwatered it by adding a bit of water every 5 minutes or so. About 15 years later I went searching for this little plant, but it was nowhere to be found. As it turned out the species used to be sold by the 100's in the late '80 s in many gardencentres in the Netherlands, but now it seems to have just disappeared. After searching many gardencentres throughout the country, I decided to try to find some seeds as a last effort to obtain this species for which I had developed something like a youth obsession. It didn't take long before I found a French seed vendor who sold me some seeds and my very first palmseedlings were soon a fact.
These are some of the seedlings in December 2006:

5665e3d3ec37d_Lytocaryumweddellianum9-12

I was happy as a child once again with these little plants. This was also the point where the palm virus got hold of me to never let go again. I started ordering more seeds of all kinds of palm species and started learning about how to germinate many different species and subsequently keeping them growing by trying to provide them as much as possible in their requirements.

I gave away many Lytocaryum seedlings and kept one for myself. Over the years it kept growing steadily as a fulltime indoor potted plant. Now, almost 10 years ag (after germination), the plant almost touches the ceiling and just 2 days ago I noticed a flower spike. My little baby has grown up, and I'm almost as proud as I am of my daughter. (I said almost)

20151204_231444.thumb.jpg.accf384f6d6809

20151205_215134.thumb.jpg.c75c0fb670d74d

It would add tremendously to my pride of this palm and my happiness if this palm would complete the life cycle by producing viable seeds. Do you guys think this would be a possibility for this single potted plant? If there is any special effort to be done to urge this palm into growing real seeds on its flower spike, what would it be? I mean, what can I actively do to improve chances to a viable seedset?

Thank you in advance for any info that might contribute to the continuous succes of my favorite housepalm!

Cheers!

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Amsterdam,

The Netherlands

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Kai, do you ever take this palm outside for filtered Sun  & rain or was it kept completely inside.  I must say you have done a MARVELOUS Job in growing this palm inside.  I was wondering about the salt build up in the container from commercial water and spider mites.  I cannot comment on seed production inside, but I have found that the more light, up to a point, will tend to produce seed than in very shady positions.  I have been growing a lot of these and like the looks for an understory palm.  I hear the seed tastes like a coconut.  I cannot believe how good it looks.

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Hi Mike, in summer I sometimes put it outside in my garden. But I have not many shaded spots. Direct sunlight will burn it, so I'm carefull with that. A nice warm shower is something I always wait for in summer, and when it starts I start placing many palms outside to get them wet. I think they like it. 

About a year ago I started collecting rainwater for all my palms and I think they're all doing better on it.

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I have been thinking about getting some sort of light-armature but up untill today I haven't found one that suits the room this plant is in. 

So you say that the more light it gets, the better chance it has in producing fruits? Any other requirements that need an upgrade? Like warmth, water or food? Too bad actually that this should happen at around the shortest day of the year. There's so little daylight here at the moment... On the other hand, it will take some months for the stalk to develop right? So maybe by the time it really needs the energy (light and stuff) to fatten up the fruits, days already have become warmer, longer and lighter. Maybe its timing is perfect!

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looking real nice.

Sheer awesomeness 

Carlsbad, California Zone 10 B on the hill (402 ft. elevation)

Sunset zone 24

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For being in a pot for it's entire life, it looks great. Such nice little palms and was surprised to see it doing so well for an indoor palm. 

Mine are outside, still in pots and are looking good. I hate to plant them out as it's nice to be able to move them where you want. 

Thanks for the post. 

Tim

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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Great job, Kai! I agree that in de seventies/eighties, these nice palms, then named Cocos weddellianum, together with Chameadorea elegans and Howea forsteriana, were readily available in the Dutch gardencentres. Last year I bought two plants at Gardenpalms in Erica. I grow them as orangerieplants, so outside in summer and in the cold greenhouse during winter, which implicates that they grow very slowly.

Wim.

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Hi Wim,

I've seen them at Gardenpalms too. After searching all the regular gardencentres and all that effort, Herbert just happened to have a forest of them. Well, it doesn't matter, I prefer to grow my own palms from seed nowadays. It makes me feel like they're realy some sort of very personal artwork, with a flowering potted palm of course being the crown on my work. 

Let's just hope for a good seedset and ensure the survival of this species at least in my home LOL!

Cheers!

 

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The Netherlands

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I would not give the palm a special treatment; L weddellianum doesn’t like changes or any "surprises“. So watering and fertilizing should be done as usual, I believe. – The time from flowering until fruiting may last four months (as recorded for L insigne).

I found an old photo, showing the manner how those palms were sold as Microcoelum weddellianum during the 1970s and 1980s:

566740f4ed870_Lytocaryumweddellianum1981

My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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14 minutes ago, Pal Meir said:

What is still better than a Lyto grown from seed by oneself? A Lyto grown from seed which comes from a Lyto grown by oneself! :D Good luck with your next Lyto generation! :greenthumb:

Thank you Pal, I hope it all works out!

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I can't add to the advice already given, but I can say that you told a great story to kick off this thread. Thanks for that.

jt

Shimoda, Japan, Lat: 36.6N, Long: 138.8

Zone 9B (kinda, sorta), Pacific Coast, 1Km inland, 75M above sea level
Coldest lows (Jan): 2-5C (35-41F), Hottest highs (Aug): 32-33C (87-91F)

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On 9-12-2015 15:14:55, Pal Meir said:

Kai, I have another question: What is the size of the pot of your Lyto (e.g. the inner diameter)? :interesting:

Hi Pal,

I had to find a tape-measure and measure the pot. Diameter is 35 cm at the top and depth is around 30 cm.

I was planning on repotting it soon but now the flower spike is coming, I don't think it's good to disturb its roots.

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5 minutes ago, Kai said:

Hi Pal,

I had to find a tape-measure and measure the pot. Diameter is 35 cm at the top and depth is around 30 cm.

I was planning on repotting it soon but now the flower spike is coming, I don't think it's good to disturb its roots.

Thanks for the info! — No, it’s not a good time for re-potting it now. It’s better to wait until the fruits are ripe, perhaps half a year later. But even then, be very, very careful! But I think, it is not necessary at all to replant it. Maybe some peat moss around the stem base will make grow some more new roots.

My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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3 hours ago, dalmatiansoap said:

Looks like a bit of salt buildup there.

Yes there is. So far the plant has not suffered from it. It has been in this pot for ages.

This is also one of the reason I wanted to repot. But now it's going to flower I don't have the guts for it.

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1 minute ago, Pal Meir said:

As your Lyto looks very healthy I don’t think that the palm has any problems with the soil as it is. On the other hand I see a possible problem with the lightsource if enough light can’t come from above any longer.

Yes Pal, I also see that. I might have square foot available for it in a heated greenhouse when the time comes. But untill that time I want to enjoy it some more at home.

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Well I could...

39 minutes ago, Pal Meir said:

Can’t you cut a hole in the ceiling? ^_^

Well, I could... but I'm not certain of the consequences regarding the wife...if you know what I mean. The palm would then grow further into our master bedroom and drop seeds onto our bed... don't know if I could convince her.

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1 hour ago, Kai said:

Thanks for the nice visual Mohsen! Aren't the fruits supposed to pop open when ripe, to reveal the seeds inside?

Kai, they are if you look closer... I was there before and seeds were completely green and impossible to remove the fruits easily ... But yesterday , they were very easy to remove the fruits so I am confident they are ripe( see same tree 2 month ago an seeds after removing the fruit)

image.jpg

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8 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

Did you steal the seeds from your neighbour’s garden? B)

Picked them from the same tree in Palmland nursery (got them as a bonus after buying a $70.00 Metallica one :) )

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks Kai for the nice update :) 

Kai, Pal: Do you think having triple Lytocaryum? have you ever tried or seen any ? as I am having quite  a few seeds , I was thinking experimenting triple seeds in one pot ?

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1 minute ago, Mohsen said:

Thanks Kai for the nice update :) 

Kai, Pal: Do you think having triple Lytocaryum? have you ever tried or seen any ? as I am having quite  a few seeds , I was thinking experimenting triple seeds in one pot ?

Hi Mohsen,

Tripples are very well possible but I prefer them solitairy myself. It looks more natural to me.

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