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W. filifera in Albuquerque


ChrisA
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11 hours ago, SailorBold said:

Recovery shot.. I'm confident they will gain mass this year..

20190607_213050.jpg

Is this trio yours? They look great

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Hi!  I have two sabals, one S. uresana and an S. palmetto “Birmingham”.  There is what I believe to be an S. mexicana at the zoo. I haven’t had a chance to visit that palm yet this year though to see how it fared.  Here are my Sabals, still extremely small. Zero damage ever on the Birmingham the other is quite a bit more tender and I am too nervous to see how much. It is easy to protect at this size though.

2CBEAE51-0371-4EEE-9FDC-0255AF7F02ED.jpeg

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Where are those saguaros off of Eubank?? Do you know how long they've been there?  Surely they were brought in at a very large size, already with arms. Must've cost a fortune! Where are those two tall Robusta at?  I've never seen such large specimens in town. Was that photo taken last year?  I bet they took a beating this past winter...

 

Thanks for posting all the great pics!  Is that your JBxB in the black gravel? Gorgeous!

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  • 2 months later...

In spite of the cold winter, the palm has rebounded amazingly as have all the others in town I've been tracking.  Here is a photo from Monday morning, 8/12. The winter fried all but one frond; now it has nearly recuperated its entire head.

 

Cheers!

2019_08.12_Washingtonia_filibusta.jpg

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Wow, I am getting Southwest Fever reading this thread.  Keep posting all of those New Mexico photos!   ....loving it.

You guys can get away with more interesting landscaping than I imagined possible at such high elevation over in Albuquerque.   Rock on. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 6/7/2019 at 7:53 PM, SailorBold said:

Very cool.. I have not.. other than these saguaros off of eubank.. I've seen an old trachy and a butia off Griegos and4th.. 

The tricho is doing well.. as is my tricho flying saucer. The red bird of paradise gets huge every year too.. I didnt fertilize it last year but the year before I did and it was 3-4 feet taller..

Do you have a mexicana? I thought you mentioned having one..

 

On 6/7/2019 at 7:53 PM, SailorBold said:

Very cool.. I have not.. other than these saguaros off of eubank.. I've seen an old trachy and a butia off Griegos and4th.. 

The tricho is doing well.. as is my tricho flying saucer. The red bird of paradise gets huge every year too.. I didnt fertilize it last year but the year before I did and it was 3-4 feet taller..

Do you have a mexicana? I thought you mentioned having one..

I think those saguaros off Eubank are excellent examples of artificial saguaros! A horse stable has some in the canyon, off NM-333 between the Carnuel exit and North Four Hills. I also saw some in a Ridgecrest front yard ages ago. Very realistic I might add!

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20 hours ago, Desert DAC said:

 

I think those saguaros off Eubank are excellent examples of artificial saguaros! A horse stable has some in the canyon, off NM-333 between the Carnuel exit and North Four Hills. I also saw some in a Ridgecrest front yard ages ago. Very realistic I might add!

Oh no way. Really? They do look very real!  I've never seen them for sale.. the only ones I've seen were metal ones. Neat..

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Those tall Washingtonia Filiferas all look great over there in Albuquerque.  They especially blend in well with the adobe pueblo style house because they just look like a southwestern tree to me (Washingonia Filiferas being native to Nevada, Arizona and SoCal deserts).  Even your own washingtonia filiferas are looking great, SailorBold, even though they aren't tall yet.  I can't remember how much your own W.F. have grown in the past few years from your PalmTalk photos, but their crowns are looking quite huge and sprawled out now.  Nice.  I just hope they stay looking that good all winter too.

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On 9/12/2019 at 10:11 PM, Sandy Loam said:

Those tall Washingtonia Filiferas all look great over there in Albuquerque.  They especially blend in well with the adobe pueblo style house because they just look like a southwestern tree to me (Washingonia Filiferas being native to Nevada, Arizona and SoCal deserts).  Even your own washingtonia filiferas are looking great, SailorBold, even though they aren't tall yet.  I can't remember how much your own W.F. have grown in the past few years from your PalmTalk photos, but their crowns are looking quite huge and sprawled out now.  Nice.  I just hope they stay looking that good all winter too.

Thanks..  Still need more years under its belt to get more mass and height.... but need tons of water during the summer to recover well.. This years monsoon returned 2 to 3" of rain.  Im going to look into diverting extra  rainwater from my roof to these trees..should help in the long run.  Lets hope for a mild winter!!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Was working at a clients house and noticed this .what do you think.. Filifera perhaps? It was late when I finished up but its in someone's back yard..

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  • 4 weeks later...

Sorry, I haven't been on PalmTalk for a while and just found this now. To my eye, that palm looks either like a Washingtonia Robusta or a Washingtonia Filifera, but I can't tell which one it is because only a few fronds are visible.

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I live in Keizer, Oregon zone 8b and there are a pair of palms that were planted about 2 years ago. they appear to be washingtonia and were completely defoliated at around 20 degrees but grew new fronds in the spring., they are still juveniles. can anyone know what they are.  i am sorry but i am unable to provide pictures

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9 hours ago, PlantDad said:

I live in Keizer, Oregon zone 8b and there are a pair of palms that were planted about 2 years ago. they appear to be washingtonia and were completely defoliated at around 20 degrees but grew new fronds in the spring., they are still juveniles. can anyone know what they are.  i am sorry but i am unable to provide pictures

How tall were they? Total defoliation at 20º is consistent with Washingtonia Robusta

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Home Depot’s in the Portland area regularly sell both Washingtonia species in the garden centers. If these ones are surviving our winters they be fillibustas.  Temps are not the issue it’s the constant cool and wet that causes fungus in the crown. I have a fillifera that I have to move out of the rain, last year.   I left it an exposed spot and by mid Feb the fungus showed up. 
 

without a pic we can’t identify it. Maybe they’re on street view?

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2 hours ago, Chester B said:

Home Depot’s in the Portland area regularly sell both Washingtonia species in the garden centers. If these ones are surviving our winters they be fillibustas.  Temps are not the issue it’s the constant cool and wet that causes fungus in the crown. I have a fillifera that I have to move out of the rain, last year.   I left it an exposed spot and by mid Feb the fungus showed up. 
 

without a pic we can’t identify it. Maybe they’re on street view?

thank you for the help. i will see if there is a street view. do you think the winter moisture can defoliate a washingtonia? also what is the name of the place that is selling them in portland?

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1 minute ago, PlantDad said:

thank you for the help. i will see if there is a street view. do you think the winter moisture can defoliate a washingtonia? also what is the name of the place that is selling them in portland?

sorry you said home depot. i need to read slower. do you have any places in portland that sells palms and exotics that you think i should visit?

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  • 5 months later...

Hi everyone, I hope all is well in these rough times. But now there's plenty of time for palms, any updates?

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On 4/25/2020 at 11:06 AM, Palm_Tree_Kid said:

Hi everyone, I hope all is well in these rough times. But now there's plenty of time for palms, any updates?

Filiferas be good.. welcome to palm talk..  what part of town are you in?

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37 minutes ago, Palm_Tree_Kid said:

Westside of ABQ (Ventana Ranch)

Awesome.  Are you growing any palms?

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1 hour ago, Palm_Tree_Kid said:

Yeah, Med. Fan, windmill, several mexican fans, and i'm still trying to germinate some others.

Nice!  Good to meet you.. there are a few abq people here that post from time to time...  Im growing med fans..needle palms.. filiferas.. some filifera-ish hybrids.. Butia hybrid.. and jubaea hybrids.  Im on the westside too.. south rio rancho just north of you.   I have some filifera seeds if you are interested... they are most likely the pure strand of filifera from TorC. Leaf hardy to about 12-14f.. a good choice of palm for our area. just let me know if you are interested.. they are easy to germinate.  

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Beautiful. If I wasn’t as much into Palms, Agave,  Cycads, etc. Albuquerque would definitely be on my list of places I would like to live.

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On 4/26/2020 at 11:54 PM, SailorBold said:

Butia hybrid.. and jubaea hybrids.

Would love to see some updates of these =) 

T J 

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On 5/3/2020 at 1:24 PM, Meangreen94z said:

Beautiful. If I wasn’t as much into Palms, Agave,  Cycads, etc. Albuquerque would definitely be on my list of places I would like to live.

Yeah..It's just too cold for the more tender stuff..but definitely a beautiful area.. all sorts of climate zones.. geology and topography within miles. It's the few days out the year that are the main problem.. other than that you can grow alot here, considering. It's still not a typical 7b/8a. I was working in Durango, CO today drove past this.. (picture is not from today) its 25 miles from my house.. there is purple dirt in those canyons lol 

20200504_214914.jpg

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1 hour ago, OC2Texaspalmlvr said:

Would love to see some updates of these =) 

Stay tuned

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1 hour ago, SailorBold said:

Yeah..It's just too cold for the more tender stuff..but definitely a beautiful area.. all sorts of climate zones.. geology and topography within miles. It's the few days out the year that are the main problem.. other than that you can grow alot here, considering. It's still not a typical 7b/8a. I was working in Durango, CO today drove past this.. (picture is not from today) its 25 miles from my house.. there is purple dirt in those canyons lol 

20200504_214914.jpg

We’ve gone camping several times in between Durango and Silverton. Rafted, ridden the steam train, driven over Engineer Pass.  It’s an amazing abandoned stage coach route that now requires a 4WD vehicle, you pass by preserved ghost towns abandoned a century ago. An extremely beautiful area.

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On 5/4/2020 at 10:10 PM, Meangreen94z said:

We’ve gone camping several times in between Durango and Silverton. Rafted, ridden the steam train, driven over Engineer Pass.  It’s an amazing abandoned stage coach route that now requires a 4WD vehicle, you pass by preserved ghost towns abandoned a century ago. An extremely beautiful area.

I didnt get to see much of it unfortunately but from what my first impressions were..  the vibe I got.. was pioneers and little house on the prairie..  and farming.. there were horses all over. It was very green and hilly with wildflowers blooming all over the small prairies. It was nice.. there were forests.. but not what I had imagined when I heard people speak of Durango.. I dont know how I got that impression...also more spread out than I thought. I was repairing a metal roof so had to work.. I d like to go back one of these days..

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On 5/4/2020 at 10:04 PM, SailorBold said:

Yeah..It's just too cold for the more tender stuff..but definitely a beautiful area.. all sorts of climate zones.. geology and topography within miles. It's the few days out the year that are the main problem.. other than that you can grow alot here, considering. It's still not a typical 7b/8a. I was working in Durango, CO today drove past this.. (picture is not from today) its 25 miles from my house.. there is purple dirt in those canyons lol 

What is considered a typical 7b/8a? Maybe a southeastern version like Atlanta or Raleigh (cloudy, wet, many less hard freezes), the southern plains like far S Oklahoma to west Texas (drier more extreme than Atlanta but not arid like ABQ), or a Pacific slope version (wet, mild winters and very warm, dry summers)?

The acidic soils in the southeast or fertile but alkaline southern plains soils help other plants we struggle with. But their extremes or lack of hardening before their bipolar temperature swings each winter, then less bright sun, lessen the ability of western palms and arid plants to take the same cold in the southeast and southcentral US as they do in ABQ, let alone Las Cruces and El Paso.

Certainly an interesting topic!

Edited by Desert DAC
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On 5/11/2020 at 1:31 PM, Desert DAC said:

What is considered a typical 7b/8a? Maybe a southeastern version like Atlanta or Raleigh (cloudy, wet, many less hard freezes), the southern plains like far S Oklahoma to west Texas (drier more extreme than Atlanta but not arid like ABQ), or a Pacific slope version (wet, mild winters and very warm, dry summers)?

The acidic soils in the southeast or fertile but alkaline southern plains soils help other plants we struggle with. But their extremes or lack of hardening before their bipolar temperature swings each winter, then less bright sun, lessen the ability of western palms and arid plants to take the same cold in the southeast and southcentral US as they do in ABQ, let alone Las Cruces and El Paso.

Certainly an interesting topic!

True True.. I suppose I would say sunshine as a factor for overall plant growth... UV would be another although that could be a neg on some plants... and perhaps lack of frost?  Ultimately any freeze will kill leaves etc. But if its accompanied with dew.. that would worsen the freeze factor.  Each area balances out tho.. pH as you mentioned.. and good acidic rainwater...

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  • 2 months later...
On 9/11/2019 at 7:35 PM, SailorBold said:

Trimmed up the palms today.. 

20190911_192952.jpg

Because Red Bird of Paradise are everywhere in Las Cruces, I didn't first notice you had one growing in this pic. How long has it been growing there? Are people using that plant in ABQ and I missed it, or is that a new plant?

I've always wondered about if it can handle short-term frozen soils and that persistent winter chill ABQ often gets that we don't. A number of the red B of P didn't survive Feb 2011 in Hatch, but I'm not there much to understand why. It gets sharply colder at night in the Hatch Valley than much of the Mesilla Valley does, let alone the majority of our town above the valley.

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1 hour ago, Desert DAC said:

Because Red Bird of Paradise are everywhere in Las Cruces, I didn't first notice you had one growing in this pic. How long has it been growing there? Are people using that plant in ABQ and I missed it, or is that a new plant?

I've always wondered about if it can handle short-term frozen soils and that persistent winter chill ABQ often gets that we don't. A number of the red B of P didn't survive Feb 2011 in Hatch, but I'm not there much to understand why. It gets sharply colder at night in the Hatch Valley than much of the Mesilla Valley does, let alone the majority of our town above the valley.

What's behind the rbop????

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5 hours ago, Desert DAC said:

Because Red Bird of Paradise are everywhere in Las Cruces, I didn't first notice you had one growing in this pic. How long has it been growing there? Are people using that plant in ABQ and I missed it, or is that a new plant?

I've always wondered about if it can handle short-term frozen soils and that persistent winter chill ABQ often gets that we don't. A number of the red B of P didn't survive Feb 2011 in Hatch, but I'm not there much to understand why. It gets sharply colder at night in the Hatch Valley than much of the Mesilla Valley does, let alone the majority of our town above the valley.

Hi DAC.....About 7-8 years planted as a 5 gallon..... It comes back every year so far..  I see them for sale at Home Depot and Lowes from time to time.. and only came across them planted once (that I noticed) in the NE heights area of ABQ  It freezes to the ground.. but a couple times I didnt cut them down until spring and they were growing from the lower part of the stems.  They start blooming in late June.. and can bloom well into November.  Never protected it.  If I fertilize, it will grow to about 8 feet.

Abq is so funky..  really a crossroads for several different climate growing zones life(?)??.. including the arctic..  but I guess thats expected with elevation changes of almost 2000 feet within the city.  Its higher than Denver!  On a side note.. I just found out there are evergreen oaks native to the foothills..

4 hours ago, jwitt said:

What's behind the rbop????

Hi Jwitt! How are you doin...That would be the Bougainvillea.. also been pretty reliable returning from the roots (so far so good).  Although its a pain to deal with..  

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Sailorbold- doing good considering all going on.  Spent some time whacking bouganvilla in east Maui, I know what you mean, mean being the word!

I think DAC is the live oak king!  If ABQ was into green, live oak is the answer. Blue live oak are my favorite, a couple around.  My opinion is live oak should be used like desert willow, on second thought.......maybe not that much!

If you were still looking to Johnny appleseed some filifera seed, I think I have the perfect local spot and microclimate in our neighborhood Naturalized vitex, yellow bird of paradise, and pampas grass......and water!  

 

Still amazed you got bouganvilla! Among other things!

 

 

 

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On 7/27/2020 at 12:57 AM, jwitt said:

Sailorbold- doing good considering all going on.  Spent some time whacking bouganvilla in east Maui, I know what you mean, mean being the word!

I think DAC is the live oak king!  If ABQ was into green, live oak is the answer. Blue live oak are my favorite, a couple around.  My opinion is live oak should be used like desert willow, on second thought.......maybe not that much!

If you were still looking to Johnny appleseed some filifera seed, I think I have the perfect local spot and microclimate in our neighborhood Naturalized vitex, yellow bird of paradise, and pampas grass......and water!  

 

Still amazed you got bouganvilla! Among other things!

 

 

 

Have you moved??  The bougainvillea blooms late..although it blooms lightly stating in june... so this year I'm pinching the stems to see if i can trigger more blooms.. im thinking about using bloom fertilizer as well.. but haven't tried that yet.

Live oaks do pretty good here.. although they are a little slow. I did see that blue oak you talk about at homes near the tram way... thats still the foothills right?  That area is really really mild considering the elevation.. even for there..  some interesting cactus as well.

I've got lots of TorC filifera seed.. i haven't grown them yet... but if you have an area.  Let me know..  ill go plant a few.

Is that what they are calling being a plant Ninja? Haha.. i still have thoughts of doing this around abq freeways...lol

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