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Arctic Storm Octavia Florida Damage Report


Moose

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This thread's purpose is to report palm damage around Florida. It can be utilized as a informational gathering tool all in one thread. Easier than sifting through all the individual threads that were sure to pop up. Thread can facilitate venting if it will make you feel better.

My garden - low 42 F.

Surprisingly a Coccothrinax montana is not looking very happy. I'm sure that the strong winds were a factor along with the cold. It will survive, just beat up looking.

Licuala grandis - another looking very unhappy. These are pretty sensitive to cold. It was in the ground in 2009-10 winter so its survival is pretty certain.

post-1729-0-08917000-1424468171.jpg

Moose out

Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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We threw blankets over the Chambeyronia and Kerriodoxa since it was such a one and done kind of freeze. Everything else Ive planted is fully hardy here (in Ocala) so the palms and cycads all look good. The herbaceous tropicals are of course fried but will rapidly come back with the warming weather. 80 degrees in Ocala on Sunday!

-Krishna

Kailua, Oahu HI. Near the beach but dry!

Still have a garden in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)

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I bottomed out at probably 32.5 (I have no outdoor thermometers). My neighbors papaya plants have about 50% leaf burn out in the open but it isn't defoliated, so I don't think we quite hit freezing. My bananas and my neighbor's bananas are undamaged. My Adonidia has some leaf damage and I have about 20% damage on the coconut leaves that I didn't protect. Everything else looks alright so far. Some of the weeds in the open area of the grass turned black so I think we had patchy frost in that spot.

Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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I had a low of 33 on the open spot in the yard but that was a very short duration, all other spots in my yard recorded 35. The only damage I see is some minor spotting on the coconuts and on my Neoveitchia storckii. My small Jamaican Tall was the most damaged, go figure. I am sure some minor damage may show up on other things but all in all it looks good.

All the bananas and papayas in my area still are green so no below freezing in my area that I can tell.

Lived in Cape Coral, Miami, Orlando and St. Petersburg Florida.

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I had a low of 33 on the open spot in the yard but that was a very short duration, all other spots in my yard recorded 35. The only damage I see is some minor spotting on the coconuts and on my Neoveitchia storckii. My small Jamaican Tall was the most damaged, go figure. I am sure some minor damage may show up on other things but all in all it looks good.

All the bananas and papayas in my area still are green so no below freezing in my area that I can tell.

What about your Pritchardia? I've seen extensive damage on P. pacifica with temps as high as 38 F.

Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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I had a low of 33 on the open spot in the yard but that was a very short duration, all other spots in my yard recorded 35. The only damage I see is some minor spotting on the coconuts and on my Neoveitchia storckii. My small Jamaican Tall was the most damaged, go figure. I am sure some minor damage may show up on other things but all in all it looks good.

All the bananas and papayas in my area still are green so no below freezing in my area that I can tell.

What about your Pritchardia? I've seen extensive damage on P. pacifica with temps as high as 38 F.

I had my 2 Pritchardia's covered and Christmas lights under the cover, so hopefully that was enough to protect them from much damage.

Lived in Cape Coral, Miami, Orlando and St. Petersburg Florida.

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As stated in both threads id started earlier, didn't see any obvious damage while at Selby other than some crispy leaf ends on some of the Heliconias around the Koi Pond and some wind burn on a couple other things. Also didn't notice any damage to Palms or other stuff on my way to and from the Gardens. Interestingly, All the Dendrobium nobile they have perched up in various Oaks near the front entrance are loaded with buds.. thanks to adequate periods of cool nights this Winter.

Back in the neighborhood here in Bradenton, nearest Papaya (near the end of our street) is full and lush, no wilted leaves. Other nearby specimens around the corner and further down 34th street also look fine. Nearby royals and a hidden Coconut in the Bayshore Gardens area only have a touch of yellow. That side of S.W. Bradenton supposedly hit 32F according to the NOAA's report. Will be checking on some other spots around town.

Greeting the sun this morning, was nice to feel a warmer wind moving out of the S.E. and feel some moisture back in the air. Atm, looks like smooth sailing ahead as far as the forecast goes. Noticed many dormant buds on several Plumeria in the yard open up a little this afternoon.

-Nathan





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Interesting micro-climates observed in this cold event. Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach, Fl. reported a low on Friday Feb. 20, 2015 of 38 F. The weather station is located in a very open area without any foliage (it is an airport). However, the low temperature recorded at a weather station located on Sunrise Ave. in Palm Beach on the same date was 44.8 F.

Just shows to go you. My Licuala grandis looks perfectly fine.The closer you can get to the Gulf Stream or any large body of water, even the east side of Lake Okeechobee, the better.

What you look for is what is looking

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I see a bit more damage showing up now, which I expected. Certainly noting bad or unexpected, but the palm that has the most tender fronds is my Latania loddigessii, It saw temps around 35 last week and was even covered. As you can see my yard is wide open, but hopefully this year my canopy will start building in.

20150224_094631_zps3492c7fa.jpg

Lived in Cape Coral, Miami, Orlando and St. Petersburg Florida.

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Checked out Kopsick and the report is good. Only damage I saw was lower leaf burning on P. pacifica. Considering how cold tender they are that's pretty good! The nearby airport reports a low of 39 F which sounds about right.

Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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Though we had a low of 33F here at Leu Gardens, a lot of the Garden is probably a few degrees warmer with tree canopy and microclimates. No real damage has showed yet. Even the Cyrtostachys hybrid still looks good.

I live in Altamonte Springs about 12 miles NW of here. I measured 30F at the house. I have some tender palms in the back under tree canopy, Archontophoenix cunninghamiana and Licuala ramsayi look fine. Pinanga coronata has a few spots. Beccariophoenix alfreddi is good.

Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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Vero Beach airport went down to 30, but duration isn't known--data outage. With a lot of leafed-out laurel oak canopy and lots of frost cloth and blankets, my yard would have been warmer. So far, the tenderest heliconias aren't showing damage. They weren't covered.

Fla. climate center: 100-119 days>85 F
USDA 1990 hardiness zone 9B
Current USDA hardiness zone 10a
4 km inland from Indian River; 27º N (equivalent to Brisbane)

Central Orlando's urban heat island may be warmer than us

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Vero Beach airport went down to 30, but duration isn't known--data outage. With a lot of leafed-out laurel oak canopy and lots of frost cloth and blankets, my yard would have been warmer. So far, the tenderest heliconias aren't showing damage. They weren't covered.

If I remembered correctly, most of the independent Vero Beach stations were showing around 34F to 35F. Just the airport was showing 30F, which also happened to be the official recorded temperature.

Brevard County, Fl

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I have not noticed any frost damage anywhere in central Brevard county. However, driving across the St. Johns River into east Orange county there appears to be extensive frost damage on the roadside weeds and on the banana trees in Wedgefield. I'm guessing it got down to 30F to 32F there.

Brevard County, Fl

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No Frost damage here in most of south brevard either, in the less populated areas of southeast and southwest palm bay, frost damage appears on a few bananas and roadside weeds but nothing on the other sensitive plants like Christmas Palm that were left uncovered, so it was very light and spotty.

It bottomed out at 35-36 here on the water and most of Palm Bay, so a good winter over all, finally we have some normal Florida warmth after that stretched odd cool period.

Malabar, Florida. Zone 10a, East Central Florida.

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36F was my winter low here and large, potted P. pacifica has considerable spotting on 3 older leaves. My Rajapuri banana is somehow perfectly green with no spotting. While the winter can be considered "warm" because no freezes have occurred locally, Tampa International Airport has been below 50F a staggering 37 times since November 1. To see a number greater than 25 is fairly rare so warm would not be a fitting description for this winter.

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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36F was my winter low here and large, potted P. pacifica has considerable spotting on 3 older leaves. My Rajapuri banana is somehow perfectly green with no spotting. While the winter can be considered "warm" because no freezes have occurred locally, Tampa International Airport has been below 50F a staggering 37 times since November 1. To see a number greater than 25 is fairly rare so warm would not be a fitting description for this winter.

I was thinking of the same thing. It has generally been pretty below average and to end it with a late cold event. This has not really been a mild winter.

Brevard County, Fl

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But it really does show how much damage can occur with just one morning of Frost compared to many cool nights, I'd rather have the cool nights (even if they are ridiculously extended) than the heavy Frost any day...

Malabar, Florida. Zone 10a, East Central Florida.

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A tad under freezing here at 31.3F, and for maybe 3 hours as it rapidly rose to 37F by 8am. I have long since stopped growing tender palms. My "most tender" include a Florida Thatch Palm that is appx 10' tall, Fishtails up to 30' and a Triangle in front even taller. The fishtail have the slightest hint of damage on some outer leaves. No other palm damaged, including Sabal dominguensis (sp). Funny, Bananas are only partially damaged as they have some canopy. A 12 foot Brazlian Cloak in full bloom (has been since Sept) was kinda fried on top, but it is due to get chopped anyway. Heliconias in open fairly fried but growth under them looks good. They are all 10 feet plus, and they get an annual March pruning anyway. Brugmansia only partially nipped on top. Again, they get chopped anyway. No bromeliads damaged, canopy or not. I am seeing some wear and tear on Crotons, begonias, etc from extended cold - it hit the 30'sF on three occasions over two weeks and several days barely 50F. Too much rain! It poured Tuesday, expecting more tonight, and last week it poured over 2 inches. These plants need warmer, dry weather - and sun! :hmm:

Begonias are my thing. I've been growing and selling them for three decades, nearly two in Tampa Bay. NPR is an bhour N of St Pete, coast

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Sounds like quite a garden. When can I visit neighbor? :)

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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I think we bottomed out at 30-32F in my yard with some possible frost in sheltered areas. Damage is overall extremely light and scattered. I am questioning the effectiveness of covering palms and other tropicals even with blankets extending to the ground, because the small palms I covered seem to have at least as much damage as the ones I didn't! I don't think there was much ground warmth left after the extended chill leading up to the event. Add to that the bit of mechanical damage to the fronds here and there from the covering, and it hardly seems worth it for borderline freeze events, which are just about the only type of freeze event my area gets nowadays.

If we really were going to have a hard freeze, say, mid 20s, like in 2010, I would cover with multiple layers and hope it means the difference between 75% defoliation and immediate outright death for a 4 foot coconut palm (for example). Even that might be expecting too much.

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Hi, Eric in Orlando and others! I am a member in Leu Gardens and am thankful for that microclimate. Maybe I have seen you out there before? I was wanting to ask you all for some feedback/prognosis about the chances that a few of my back yard specimens will recover. I live in Apopka off Rock Springs Road, near Rock Springs Elementary (metro Orlando).

In my back yard, I have a 20+ foot royal palm that was transplanted to that location almost two years ago. Initially, it suffered from transplant shock. I didn't think it was going to make it. Lost all of its fronds soon after transplant. Then in 2014, it recovered quite well and has (had!) a nice set of fronds, leading me to believe it was well on its way. Enter the dreaded freeze of 2/20: all the fronds are brown and fried. Very discouraging. I wonder if I need to take out the chain saw, or wait a couple of months and see what happens.

I have two full, medium sized arecas that were burned - but there are a few interior green fronds that were left untouched, so I think they will come back.

Two alexander palms: I purchased these from Rockledge Gardens a little less than a year ago. One of them has has only about 25-30% freeze damage to the fronds, so I expect it to recover. This is probably due to the propane heater I had underneath.

The other alexander palm did not fare so well - it has about 80% freeze damage (85% brown), with a couple of the smaller, lower fronds retaining most of their green. I did not get a heater underneath this specimen in time.

My two christmas palms did relatively well due to heaters and covering.

My large foxtail sustained frond damage on the top halves of the upper fronds, with the lower fronds being protected by a propane heater. I would say the foxtail fronds sustained about 30% browning. Could have been worse.

The birds of paradise will end up losing at least 75% of their mature leaves - damage still manifesting itself. The travelers palm will lose all of its leaves.

My wife is ready to tear all of this stuff out and invest in some sylvesters. I am wondering what the prognosis might be. Appreciate any feedback! Encouragement especially appreciated! Was a tough night to endure - we are ready to move to South Florida after this event.

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Out of boredom , I did a moderate drive around NSB , and a bit of the north part of Edgewater today.

I was East of US1 , and along the river , and also a bit of the North causeway.

Not much damage at all really. More or less the usual winter yellowing etc.

There's a few Royals , a bunch of Foxtails , Triangles , and a very few Veithchias even .

AND.. one Coconut at a house on Middle Way in a neighborhood along the North Causeway . That

house has a 2 story wing , and had in the past a Coco that was about 18' or so that probably died in

2010 , BUT has been replaced , and the new one is 8' or so. It is along the South side of the house, so

has a great advantage . I failed to have a camera .

There are also a few other indicator plants , i.e. Jacaranda , Hong Kong Orchid , Ficus etc.

Also in NSB , the 3 very tall Royals at the south end of the airport look fine. They are totally exposed to the

North wind , and have been there for quite a number of years.

Daytona Beach area pretty much the same. This was a mild freeze , and other than being a bit late in the season

wasn't much around here . The 50's thru the 90's exceeded this approx 75% of the years.

Well west of US1 has the usual fried bananas etc.

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I think we bottomed out at 30-32F in my yard with some possible frost in sheltered areas. Damage is overall extremely light and scattered. I am questioning the effectiveness of covering palms and other tropicals even with blankets extending to the ground, because the small palms I covered seem to have at least as much damage as the ones I didn't! I don't think there was much ground warmth left after the extended chill leading up to the event. Add to that the bit of mechanical damage to the fronds here and there from the covering, and it hardly seems worth it for borderline freeze events, which are just about the only type of freeze event my area gets nowadays.

If we really were going to have a hard freeze, say, mid 20s, like in 2010, I would cover with multiple layers and hope it means the difference between 75% defoliation and immediate outright death for a 4 foot coconut palm (for example). Even that might be expecting too much.

I use frost cloth! It protects to 26-28 depending on thickness, and I get ZERO damage underneath. Blankets only protect from frost and ice. Frost cloth actually keeps the temp above freezing...big difference.

Begonias are my thing. I've been growing and selling them for three decades, nearly two in Tampa Bay. NPR is an bhour N of St Pete, coast

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I would argue heavy comforters insulate much better than frost cloth. The idea is trapping ground heat so thicker, heavier and less porous material is better. I've used these thick blankets without an issue for nearly 20 years. That said, I complement with frost cloth because 30' x 60' comforters don't exist :) .

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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Out of boredom , I did a moderate drive around NSB , and a bit of the north part of Edgewater today.

I was East of US1 , and along the river , and also a bit of the North causeway.

Not much damage at all really. More or less the usual winter yellowing etc.

There's a few Royals , a bunch of Foxtails , Triangles , and a very few Veithchias even .

AND.. one Coconut at a house on Middle Way in a neighborhood along the North Causeway . That

house has a 2 story wing , and had in the past a Coco that was about 18' or so that probably died in

2010 , BUT has been replaced , and the new one is 8' or so. It is along the South side of the house, so

has a great advantage . I failed to have a camera .

There are also a few other indicator plants , i.e. Jacaranda , Hong Kong Orchid , Ficus etc.

Also in NSB , the 3 very tall Royals at the south end of the airport look fine. They are totally exposed to the

North wind , and have been there for quite a number of years.

Daytona Beach area pretty much the same. This was a mild freeze , and other than being a bit late in the season

wasn't much around here . The 50's thru the 90's exceeded this approx 75% of the years.

Well west of US1 has the usual fried bananas etc.

I have always wanted to know what grew where in Volusia. Are there any significant strangler figs or gumbo limbo up that way by any chance?

Brevard County, Fl

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Hi, Eric in Orlando and others!

I live in Apopka off Rock Springs Road, near Rock Springs Elementary (metro Orlando).

My wife is ready to tear all of this stuff out and invest in some sylvesters. I am wondering what the prognosis might be. Appreciate any feedback! Encouragement especially appreciated! Was a tough night to endure - we are ready to move to South Florida after this event.

You live in the colder area of Orlando. I am afraid you have two choices long term: either move to another location if that's what you want to do, or expect to cover those palms every year. The bottom line is, you cannot expect to have those palms grow there unprotected long term.

Brevard County, Fl

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Jim, thanks. I am not an expert on microclimates like some of you, so I greatly appreciate your input. I have only been experimenting with palms for about three years. I was also impressed with the technical maps of Brevard County which you posted (the one that showed the temperature bands). Is there anything like that available for Orange County? I live about ten miles from Leu Gardens as the crow flies. Leu Gardens is also in Orange County, albeit on a lake. Still, Leu Gardens is not locked in a jungle of cement like downtown Orlando, so I would not expect Leu to benefit from the "heat island" effect. With all of this in mind, given how close the two Orange County locations are, how can Leu Gardens be significantly warmer than Apopka? Apparently it is - I just fail to understand why.

Remember, Apopka city limits adjoin Orlando city limits. Maybe Orange County is so close to the margin that even 2 or 3 miles going south and east can make a dramatic difference.

Also, in Mount Dora (further north/further west), I see some impressive tropical specimens planted in a variety of locations, which seem to have been in the ground for years (alexanders, foxtails, arecas, majesty palms, and Christmas palms). Could Mount Dora be warmer than Apopka in spite of its geographical coordinates?

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Jim, thanks. I am not an expert on microclimates like some of you, so I greatly appreciate your input. I have only been experimenting with palms for about three years. I was also impressed with the technical maps of Brevard County which you posted (the one that showed the temperature bands). Is there anything like that available for Orange County? I live about ten miles from Leu Gardens as the crow flies. Leu Gardens is also in Orange County, albeit on a lake. Still, Leu Gardens is not locked in a jungle of cement like downtown Orlando, so I would not expect Leu to benefit from the "heat island" effect. With all of this in mind, given how close the two Orange County locations are, how can Leu Gardens be significantly warmer than Apopka? Apparently it is - I just fail to understand why.

Remember, Apopka city limits adjoin Orlando city limits. Maybe Orange County is so close to the margin that even 2 or 3 miles going south and east can make a dramatic difference.

Also, in Mount Dora (further north/further west), I see some impressive tropical specimens planted in a variety of locations, which seem to have been in the ground for years (alexanders, foxtails, arecas, majesty palms, and Christmas palms). Could Mount Dora be warmer than Apopka in spite of its geographical coordinates?

I have a couple of exams I am currently studying for. It takes me about three hours to do a map of a single county, and I don't think I can do a map of Orange county as well as I did for Brevard, Indian River, and St. Lucie counties. I'll try to do one maybe in a week or two if there is enough demand for it.

Brevard County, Fl

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Jim, you're actually the designer of that map - that's pretty amazing. Well, by all means put your exams first. If you are up to constructing one of those for Orange, I know I'd be a big fan. Actually, it might be a huge benefit to Central Florida palm amateurs everywhere for the following reason: Orange County seems to sit literally right on the DMZ line between "solid subtropical" and "subtropical but transitioning to tropical," if that makes any sense. Being right on the margin, it is critical for Orange Co enthusiasts to know the conditions of their locations. Compare that to Southern Brevard County (coastal) - our friends there have a little more forgiveness each winter since you are comfortably within zone 10a, and are not as close to the margin. Anyway, I appreciate your insights, and I know others in this area do too. I am not sure of your background, but you must be an engineer of some variety. Cheers!

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Jim, you're actually the designer of that map - that's pretty amazing. Well, by all means put your exams first. If you are up to constructing one of those for Orange, I know I'd be a big fan. Actually, it might be a huge benefit to Central Florida palm amateurs everywhere for the following reason: Orange County seems to sit literally right on the DMZ line between "solid subtropical" and "subtropical but transitioning to tropical," if that makes any sense. Being right on the margin, it is critical for Orange Co enthusiasts to know the conditions of their locations. Compare that to Southern Brevard County (coastal) - our friends there have a little more forgiveness each winter since you are comfortably within zone 10a, and are not as close to the margin. Anyway, I appreciate your insights, and I know others in this area do too. I am not sure of your background, but you must be an engineer of some variety. Cheers!

I am an aspiring economist :winkie:

Brevard County, Fl

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Maybe you can do your dissertation on the economics of growing (and replacing) zone 10b palms in zone 9a? Wait, that's seeming a little too obvious to some of us right now after 2/20 :)

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Jim : "I have always wanted to know what grew where in Volusia. Are there any significant strangler figs or gumbo limbo up that way by any chance?"

In the Daytona area , there's a very few stranglers , but I've never noticed a Gumbo Limbo . Seagrape becomes progressively smaller as you go

north of the Seashore Park , but of course is used extensively for landscaping , so that's a subjective reading .

Inland area have a large variation in microclimate , and this is a large county , so NW to SE , and St Johns River to the Ocean with several significant

ridges gives a huge differential in freeze performance . The angle of the coast is generally about 15 deg to the NW , and so a dead North flow can produce

a narrow area receiving some marine influence . In my experience the worst events have always been accompanied by strong overnight winds , and those have

been the '62 , '83 and '85 type which puts us in our place . Our more Northern locations have a number of daytime highs during cold spells that are in the 40's, and that is a factor.

jranew : As in any other area , Topo , proximity to water , and location of the measuring station , etc affect the result .

Apopka is/was an agricultural area , and Leu is in an urban area with lots of canopy , and while not a concrete jungle , is deep within a built

up city .

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After a full week, noticed some cosmetic damage on one of my Jamaican Rain Trees id left exposed. Already shed those leaves and pushing new growth. Also noticed some minor burn on my taller Caesalpinia peltophoroides which had just flushed new foliage just before the cold spell.

No other damage noted to Coconuts, Veitchia, or Adonidias around town, or along the route I take daily to and from Sarasota. Trunking Cuban Petticoat at the corner of 26th St and 53rd Ave looks perfect.

-Nathan




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** ^ Correction to above: Cuban Petticoat is at 57th Ave and 26th St.

Edited by Silas_Sancona
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I would argue heavy comforters insulate much better than frost cloth. The idea is trapping ground heat so thicker, heavier and less porous material is better. I've used these thick blankets without an issue for nearly 20 years. That said, I complement with frost cloth because 30' x 60' comforters don't exist :) .

Wherever my frost cloth covered it was fine...any "blankets" I use damage shows, albeit slight. Always the case whether 2010 or last week. :mrlooney:

Begonias are my thing. I've been growing and selling them for three decades, nearly two in Tampa Bay. NPR is an bhour N of St Pete, coast

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Stop using paper thin blankets. :mrlooney:

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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Hi, Eric in Orlando and others! I am a member in Leu Gardens and am thankful for that microclimate. Maybe I have seen you out there before? I was wanting to ask you all for some feedback/prognosis about the chances that a few of my back yard specimens will recover. I live in Apopka off Rock Springs Road, near Rock Springs Elementary (metro Orlando).

In my back yard, I have a 20+ foot royal palm that was transplanted to that location almost two years ago. Initially, it suffered from transplant shock. I didn't think it was going to make it. Lost all of its fronds soon after transplant. Then in 2014, it recovered quite well and has (had!) a nice set of fronds, leading me to believe it was well on its way. Enter the dreaded freeze of 2/20: all the fronds are brown and fried. Very discouraging. I wonder if I need to take out the chain saw, or wait a couple of months and see what happens.

I have two full, medium sized arecas that were burned - but there are a few interior green fronds that were left untouched, so I think they will come back.

Two alexander palms: I purchased these from Rockledge Gardens a little less than a year ago. One of them has has only about 25-30% freeze damage to the fronds, so I expect it to recover. This is probably due to the propane heater I had underneath.

The other alexander palm did not fare so well - it has about 80% freeze damage (85% brown), with a couple of the smaller, lower fronds retaining most of their green. I did not get a heater underneath this specimen in time.

My two christmas palms did relatively well due to heaters and covering.

My large foxtail sustained frond damage on the top halves of the upper fronds, with the lower fronds being protected by a propane heater. I would say the foxtail fronds sustained about 30% browning. Could have been worse.

The birds of paradise will end up losing at least 75% of their mature leaves - damage still manifesting itself. The travelers palm will lose all of its leaves.

My wife is ready to tear all of this stuff out and invest in some sylvesters. I am wondering what the prognosis might be. Appreciate any feedback! Encouragement especially appreciated! Was a tough night to endure - we are ready to move to South Florida after this event.

You are in a cold pocket, I doubt the Royal will make it longterm. There used to be some royals at an office along 436 at Hunt Club. They had been there for several years but the winter of 2009-10 wiped them out.

NW of Orlando is a very cold pocket. Its very hilly and not many large lakes for influence unless you are on the south/SE side of Lake Apopka. The best warm areas of Orange County is the metro region of orlando/Winter Park and into Maitland. Also the Conway area and Windamere/Bay Hill areas near the lakes.

This past cold spell we had 33F here at Leu Gardens. I live in Altamonte Springs (west of I-4) and had 30F. The director here at Leu lives towards Lake Mary and had 25F. so you can see the big diffrence. There has been quite a few times in the past where he has come in and said it was 27-28 at his house and it is 40 here at Leu Gardens.

Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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Also, I forgot to add temperatures can vary here at Leu Gardens depending on the location. The Gardens has 50 acres. A few years ago we had one night at 28F. The nearest NWS station is the Orlando Executive airport. They had 28F and our weather station did too. We put 15 hi/low thermometers out in different parts of the Garden. We got readings from 26-35. A majority were in the 29-30 range. The 26 reading was in a wide open area and is the coldest location here. The 35 was at the bottom of the Tropical Stream Garden adjacent to the lake.

Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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Thanks, Eric. Based on the damage, I have no doubt that it dipped to 28 or 29 in my yard for an appreciable period of time (although my thermometer never showed below 33). I see some significant green on the bottom half of the royal palm's remaining spear, so it may well come back - although this season is probably the tree's last chance. A harsh 2015-16 winter will surely do it in.

I am surprised the foxtail and the two Christmas palms did so well, quite frankly. The roebelini also did not lose a single frond (was totally unprotected)!

Regarding royal palms - I wonder if the Jamaican royals like you have at Leu are hardier than the cuban royals. Your specimens seem to be quite healthy.

At a Mt. Dora nursery yesterday, I see where they have two large royals for sale. This seems to be too far north/west for royals to survive, IMO.

The traveler's palm and the birds of paradise in my yard have lost 90% of their foliage. When is the best time to trim these dead leaves back? Is it best to wait awhile, as is the case with palms? Will waiting on this trimming increase the likelihood of disease?

LEU GARDENS - we can't wait for the boardwalk area near the tropical stream to open back up. The girls want to see the turtles again! Keep up the good work.

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