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Butyagrus eriospatha


Raniked

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Wish I had one to upload a picture of it.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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This is my biggest B.eriospatha X S. romanzoffiana

post-465-0-75921000-1423004522_thumb.jpg

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Carambeí, 2nd tableland of the State Paraná , south Brazil.

Alt:1030m. Native palms: Queen, B. eriospatha, B. microspadix, Allagoptera leucocalyx , A.campestris, Geonoma schottiana, Trithrinax acanthocoma. Subtr. climate, some frosty nights. No dry season. August: driest month. Rain:1700mm

 

I am seeking for cold hardy palms!

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Cool palm, where did you come across it? Or are you the creator?

I found this one at a nursery labeled as "butia"

I have little seedlings of this hybrid and at the momment Im making this again.

Carambeí, 2nd tableland of the State Paraná , south Brazil.

Alt:1030m. Native palms: Queen, B. eriospatha, B. microspadix, Allagoptera leucocalyx , A.campestris, Geonoma schottiana, Trithrinax acanthocoma. Subtr. climate, some frosty nights. No dry season. August: driest month. Rain:1700mm

 

I am seeking for cold hardy palms!

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What a great find....trunk looks thinner than most odorata mules.

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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Julien, I saw a monster mule today but failed to take a picture :( I don't have any in the ground yet. Mine are all in 15 gal & 24' boxes. If all goes well I'm going to cluster plant about 5-6 this year at my vista garden.

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Carlsbad, California Zone 10 B on the hill (402 ft. elevation)

Sunset zone 24

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Cool palm, where did you come across it? Or are you the creator?

I found this one at a nursery labeled as "butia"

I have little seedlings of this hybrid and at the momment Im making this again.

Nice find Alberto. Also good to see you continuing your hard work on these hybrids. I hope you give us PT folks a heads up if you have some for sale.

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What a great find....trunk looks thinner than most odorata mules.

Actually I think they have bigger trunk than regular mules.

I started this thread because of a picture I've seen on the EPS forum (European Palm society) of a Butyagrus eriospatha posted by Nigel. The one he posted is a beauty, one of the most amazing picture of a hybrid I've seen so far. I hope he can read this and share it here.

Edited by Raniked
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Sometimes during travels I saw some very fantastic hansome Butyagrus (even more than the ones Nigel shew on EPS forum) Compared to this , mine is not the best looking.

Carambeí, 2nd tableland of the State Paraná , south Brazil.

Alt:1030m. Native palms: Queen, B. eriospatha, B. microspadix, Allagoptera leucocalyx , A.campestris, Geonoma schottiana, Trithrinax acanthocoma. Subtr. climate, some frosty nights. No dry season. August: driest month. Rain:1700mm

 

I am seeking for cold hardy palms!

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I certaily have but I´ll have to dig into zillions of photos. :bummed:

Carambeí, 2nd tableland of the State Paraná , south Brazil.

Alt:1030m. Native palms: Queen, B. eriospatha, B. microspadix, Allagoptera leucocalyx , A.campestris, Geonoma schottiana, Trithrinax acanthocoma. Subtr. climate, some frosty nights. No dry season. August: driest month. Rain:1700mm

 

I am seeking for cold hardy palms!

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Would be nice to develop a mule with a thin smooth trunk

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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that would be very cool. Sounds like a project for Alberto??

Carlsbad, California Zone 10 B on the hill (402 ft. elevation)

Sunset zone 24

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syagrus schizophylla x Buta yatay would also be cool. I'm not sure if they even exist?

Carlsbad, California Zone 10 B on the hill (402 ft. elevation)

Sunset zone 24

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  • 1 year later...

I also would like more information on this cross as I have just bought a small one from Nigel, Hardy Palms UK. How fast is it? what sort of winter temperatures has it taken?  Thanks.

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18 hours ago, Jungle Jas. said:

I also would like more information on this cross as I have just bought a small one from Nigel, Hardy Palms UK. How fast is it? what sort of winter temperatures has it taken?  Thanks.

in february 12, we had a severe cold spell in France with about a whole week with temperatures below freezing point (down to -12°C). A palm fellow here nearby Toulouse had one of these hybrids in his garden, it got defoliated but recovered quite fast (and the palm had just been planted the preceding summer.)

You can see a picture of this palm on this page http://fousdepalmiers.fr/html/forum/viewtopic.php?f=72&t=1484&start=75

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  • 6 years later...
  • 3 months later...

@Mattpalm28

Here is my Butia eriospatha x Queen (photo from October this year, planted in March).

Please excuse the weeds etc. as this planting area is still a work in progress.

IMG_20231004_184912.thumb.jpg.f0ded27c28eee2a1e924b9d6ec34c1bd.jpgIMG_20231004_184902.thumb.jpg.0259c386116620b98f20cd3bf412f562.jpg

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6 hours ago, Mattpalm28 said:

@LivistonaFan where are you located? Have you noticed much grown on yours?

Hi, this palm is on the Northern Coast of the Mediterranean in Italy, at a little less than 500 Meters elevation. My zone is roughly 9a/b even if the recent winters were mostly 10a.

I water my palms very irregularly, which puts them under stress every summer, certainly in the first few years after planting. Given this, this hybrid has done extremely well and has not lost any fronds, in fact, it has produced some new ones. Of the 30 or so different palm species I have planted over the last 5 years, only one of my Parajubaea totally var microcarpa has performed better. 

I would therefore say that this palm looks very promising and probably belongs in the category of quick-growing & resilient palms.

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