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Silas_Sancona

A thread for anyone, and everyone who enjoys these plants..

While one of the most iconic plants in dry desert landscapes,  the Genus Yucca can be found almost anywhere from the Prairies of the northern Plains, to the humid Southeast. Many also extend deep into the subtropical portions of Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central America as well. Many species are well established in landscapes worldwide.

 Often enough, while iconic species as Yucca brevifolia, Joshua Tree, or Yucca elephantes /guatemalensis, Giant Yucca come to mind when picturing them, the Genus contains upwards of 49 or so species and numerous sub species that range from small, non-trunking, Agave-like plants, to imposing giants.  Some are quite common, others rarer. All offer something to admire in the garden among Cacti, Aloe, Agave, or mixed in among Palms and other tropicals.  Cause for much debate, a common California native, Yucca whipplei, and 1 or 2 other species, were split into their own Genus, Hesperoyucca, with the main suggested differences between the two Genera being tied to DNA analysis, and both the morphology of reproductive structure, and pollen.

Several produce both edible seed pods and/ or flowers, and many have been used for various applications by man throughout time. Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of these plants is that many have a special relationship with specific Moths which pollinate them. In a time of shifting climate, some Yucca species may become less common as the range of their pollinator shifts as well.  Regardless, nearly all can be propagated from stem or root cuttings.

Some pictures of a few i'm currently growing, and some others from around town. Growing some yourself?.. or have pictures of others around to share?    Share 'em,  Re-share 'em:).

Yucca elata. Specimen growing in the Desert outside Tucson, Pic #2.
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Yucca glauca.. My seed started plant, 3yrs old. Seed orig. collected in Cimarron Co. OK.
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Some seedlings of Y. glauca, " Pink Sepal Form" Seed was collected from a population of the species which supposedly produces more pinkish / maroon-ish colored Sepals.
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Yucca baccata, supposedly the non-trunking form, we'll see.  Pic. #2: Flowering specimen in Glendale.
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My personal favorite, Yucca endlichiana, Looks more like a small Agave sp. than a Yucca. Rarer and not always easy to find. Supposedly hardy to 15F. Had mine fore 3 years. Flowers form inside the cluster and aren't as easy to observe, compared to most other Yucca sp. Still waiting for Flowers. 
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Some other Y. endlichiana specimens around town. Pic #1: Desert botanical, nice side by side comparison between a more greenish and a more bluish specimen. Pic. #2:  Hanging out beneath a large Bursera fageroides at a local specialty Nursery here in Chandler.  No clue on age.
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Yucca pallida.. One of the nicest of the non trunking sp. imo. Clusters more than it spreads. Foliage is always this vivid Turquoise-y blue green, and isn't stiff. Still has some tiny teeth on the leaf margins though.  Had to have one for the collection when i saw some plants in the neighborhood up close / in flower. 
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Have posted these pics before, but.. heck, why not again ( pics:#2-3 ). Seeing these used more and more in commercial/ city landscape projects around town.
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Thinking this is Yucca filifera. Desert Botanical's collection. On the "to add" list.
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Tom in Tucson

Some of my favorite species are Yucca linearifolia and Yucca queretaroensis (which I'm growing in my yard) are depicted here. I even have 2 of the hybrids (Y. filifera x Y. queretaroensis) which were sold as pure species of Y. queretaroensis by RPS a few years ago. The video linked to Youtube on this site is about an hour long, but it contains some nice drone footage as well as some useful information.

If you ever find any seed of Y. endlichiana let me know.

Hi 72˚, Lo 41˚

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Silas_Sancona
23 minutes ago, Tom in Tucson said:

Some of my favorite species are Yucca linearifolia and Yucca queretaroensis (which I'm growing in my yard) are depicted here. I even have 2 of the hybrids (Y. filifera x Y. queretaroensis) which were sold as pure species of Y. queretaroensis by RPS a few years ago. The video linked to Youtube on this site is about an hour long, but it contains some nice drone footage as well as some useful information.

If you ever find any seed of Y. endlichiana let me know.

Hi 72˚, Lo 41˚

:greenthumb: Saw that video.. Need to finish it, lol. Beautiful scenery and interesting to see how the sp. he documented grow in some pretty crazy places. Linearifolia is another species on my list..

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Meangreen94z

Nice. I have 4 Yucca Rostrata, 2 Yucca Rigida, and 5 Yucca Filifera. I also have several Dasylirion species. 

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Meangreen94z

Here’s a photo from 2-3 years ago. at my old house. The 2 headed Rostrata and the Filifera to the left have grown considerably 

18B35DE8-2133-4D26-9534-9F7FDF2AF0C8.jpeg

Edited by Meangreen94z
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jimmyt

That seems crazy to me!  A flourishing cacti garden next to a bayou canal.  @Meangreen94z you are getting the better of mother nature!  Kudos to you!  How well does the ocotillos grow down there?

jimmyt

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Meangreen94z

The Ocotillo do well if you can find them seed/container grown with roots. The ones I bought were chopped below the base and taken from the wild. It can take a decade, if ever, to regrow a root system. I have several other forms of seed grown Fouquieria that are flourishing.

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Silas_Sancona
On 12/16/2019 at 6:03 AM, Meangreen94z said:

The Ocotillo do well if you can find them seed/container grown with roots. The ones I bought were chopped below the base and taken from the wild. It can take a decade, if ever, to regrow a root system. I have several other forms of seed grown Fouquieria that are flourishing.

:greenthumb: Yep, and this should be Gospel.. Never buy Ocotillo that aren't seed grown, period.. The ones you see offered bare root rarely ( if ever ) succeed. Cuttings can also a 50/50 gamble.  On the other hand, F. macdougalii seems to buck that thought. Cuttings i was forced to take some time ago have done fine / grown well for years.

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Merlyn

This is a pretty common one, I guess it's a Yucca Gloriosa that's been in place around 30 years.  Unfortunately it's a crummy phone photo from across a swamp. 

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Axel Amsterdam

Isn't that a regular (house)yucca elephantipes/gigantea?

Gloriosa, at least in Europe, is a short trunk species.  

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RyManUtah

Some of my favorites. 
all pretty common, some wild, but I enjoy their aesthetics. 

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Silas_Sancona

Speaking of Yucca brevifolia, have some starting to germinate atm. Seed was gifted to me by my sister when her and my nieces / nephew came to visit over Thanksgiving. They'd made a quick side trip over to Joshua Tree on the way here from San Jose. Put them down around the 1st of December, right about the same time the weather got cooler/ wetter. 

We'll see what the final germination %' age is come Spring.  Used my sand/ grit/ turface mix.. topped with 1/4th inch granite and some mesquite duff. Very little organics in the soil mix itself otherwise.. First time trying these.
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RyManUtah
3 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Speaking of Yucca brevifolia, have some starting to germinate atm. Seed was gifted to me by my sister when her and my nieces / nephew came to visit over Thanksgiving. They'd made a quick side trip over to Joshua Tree on the way here from San Jose. Put them down around the 1st of December, right about the same time the weather got cooler/ wetter. 

We'll see what the final germination %' age is come Spring.  Used my sand/ grit/ turface mix.. topped with 1/4th inch granite and some mesquite duff. Very little organics in the soil mix itself otherwise.. First time trying these.
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Good luck! If they’re fresh they should germinate rather easily. Which appears to be your case! Easily my favorite yucca. Will take many years to branch. 
I applied for a plant tag for 2020. If I am lucky in obtaining, I’ll get to bring a large specimen home. 

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Silas_Sancona
4 minutes ago, Ryagra said:

Good luck! If they’re fresh they should germinate rather easily. Which appears to be your case! Easily my favorite yucca. Will take many years to branch. 
I applied for a plant tag for 2020. If I am lucky in obtaining, I’ll get to bring a large specimen home. 

Agree, lol  will be long gone before they start looking anywhere close to "Joshua Tree" like.. Wasn't expecting the gift but figure i'll be able to share some later on. Good luck on the permit quest.. You'll have to share pics when you install it.

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RyManUtah
51 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Agree, lol  will be long gone before they start looking anywhere close to "Joshua Tree" like.. Wasn't expecting the gift but figure i'll be able to share some later on. Good luck on the permit quest.. You'll have to share pics when you install it.

It’s a great gift for sure! 
will do. If granted the harvest permit will be good for October 2020-March 2021. I should know by summer, however. It is for a specimen tho to four feet tall. 

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Silas_Sancona
25 minutes ago, Ryagra said:

It’s a great gift for sure! 
will do. If granted the harvest permit will be good for October 2020-March 2021. I should know by summer, however. It is for a specimen tho to four feet tall. 

:greenthumb: Starting out w/a 4' er isn't bad..  Thats about the height i'd want to put in the ground. Get kind of nervous w/ bigger stuff, especially something like Joshua Trees which might be more sensitive to disturbance when older/ bigger.  Figure, w/ the seed.. Depending what happens, those i hang onto will be big enough to plant in a few years. Hopefully i'll be in my own place with plenty of space to plant by then.. My Nephew ( second youngest of the kids ) will be half way thru.. or almost done w/ High school by then and was thinking it would be a neat experience to plant the plants as part of a post graduation, welcome to the start of adulthood kind of tribute. 

As far as Yucca in general, really like the smaller forms of Yucca harrimaniae, particularly the form some consider it's own species, Yucca nana.

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Meangreen94z

A few from the Austin, TX areafile.php?id=72741^ naturally growing on Lake Travisfile.php?id=72737

file.php?id=72736^^That SUV is immediately behind that Faxoniana for size reference. Monster.file.php?id=72735^^Dasylirion but still greatfile.php?id=72733file.php?id=72732file.php?id=72734file.php?id=72808file.php?id=72807file.php?id=72806^^Yucca Rigida

file.php?id=72820

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Meangreen94z

image.png.c4db1903b9c0ad8bbb2887c9215adb09.pngRyManUtah do you know if that’s Yucca Filifera or Valida? If it’s in your area I would figure it would have to be Filifera.

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RyManUtah
15 minutes ago, Meangreen94z said:

image.png.c4db1903b9c0ad8bbb2887c9215adb09.pngRyManUtah do you know if that’s Yucca Filifera or Valida? If it’s in your area I would figure it would have to be Filifera.

This is one is Yucca brevifolia.
Yucca filifera is also plentifully planted in the area. 

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RyManUtah

@Meangreen94z I’m pretty sure they are these (google street link). Regardless, I took the picture in the area of this hospital. I lot of yuccas planted around it. 

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Silas_Sancona
5 minutes ago, RyManUtah said:

@Meangreen94z I’m pretty sure they are these (google street link). Regardless, I took the picture in the area of this hospital. I lot of yuccas planted around it. 

 

9 minutes ago, RyManUtah said:

This is one is Yucca brevifolia.
Yucca filifera is also plentifully planted in the area. 

 ^ Agree, Y. filifera tends to have somewhat longer and floppier leaves,  though they're held close to the branches as well.  These look what many people call Yucca jaegeriana ( Yes, lol even Desert Botanical has theirs labeled as such ).. Should be labeled: Yucca brevifolia var. jaegeriana. 

Valida would've been my second guess, except it might be too cold to grow them there in St. George ..though they're supposedly hardy to 19-20F ( maybe a couple degrees less once massive ).

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Meangreen94z

Thanks, that makes sense. I was thrown off by the upright stance of the branches.

Yeah, Valida is only hardy to 17-19*F. Otherwise I would have had them on my list. Austin hits 15*F every 7-8 years. I might still try them just to see. 
 

I have the “blue” variation of Brevifolia. Still small. The Jaegeriana I had a few years ago died, I should try again. 

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amh

I really like that Yucca rigida, I think ill have to add that to my "to grow" list.

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amh

I acquired the seeds for this yucca while in Cotulla, does anyone know the species?

5 years old from seed with no irrigation or fertilizer.

20201031.thumb.jpg.1ad9a3b3c5ab31ed3bcdf6925805490b.jpg

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Meangreen94z

Here’s a close up of my larger Rigida in my previous backyard. Both of my Rigida have 2 trunks.

E3E27E2C-C4C5-46BB-86FE-3A5F039F945B.jpeg

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amh
2 minutes ago, Meangreen94z said:

Here’s a close up of my larger Rigida in my previous backyard. Both of my Rigida have 2 trunks.

Yup, I like these. Did you start them from seed or buy plants, and about how old are they?

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Meangreen94z
34 minutes ago, amh said:

I acquired the seeds for this yucca while in Cotulla, does anyone know the species?

5 years old from seed with no irrigation or fertilizer.

20201031.thumb.jpg.1ad9a3b3c5ab31ed3bcdf6925805490b.jpg

Location of Cotulla, Texas and based on appearance Yucca Treculeana 

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Meangreen94z
6 minutes ago, amh said:

Yup, I like these. Did you start them from seed or buy plants, and about how old are they?

The two trunking Rigida I have I bought from “Cactus King” while in Houston. I also have seedlings. I’m sure you can find them at a good price if you look around South Texas or find a wholesaler.

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amh
Just now, Meangreen94z said:

Location of Cotulla, Texas and based on appearance Yucca Treculeana 

Highly likely, I get confused by how many different yuccas are called Spanish dagger, Spanish bayonet, banana yucca, etc.

3 minutes ago, Meangreen94z said:

The two trunking Rigida I have I bought from “Cactus King” while in Houston. I also have seedlings. I’m sure you can find them at a good price if you look around South Texas or find a wholesaler.

I've seen them for sale, but had only seen small plants. After seeing the mature plants you posted, I'll buy some next time I see them for sale.

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Meangreen94z

Yeah it’s confusing. Spanish Dagger can be Treculeana or Gloriosa, Spanish Bayonet is Aloifolia, etc. But I’ve seen them mistakenly used on others as well. Then you have places like TyTy Nursery who sell them only by their nick name and one very blurry photo(seemingly intentionally). I ordered a 3-4 foot “Joshua Yucca” (Brevifolia one would think?)and received Gloriosa instead? If I order online for yucca it’s only reputable nursery’s now.

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Silas_Sancona
8 minutes ago, amh said:

Highly likely, I get confused by how many different yuccas are called Spanish dagger, Spanish bayonet, banana yucca, etc.

I've seen them for sale, but had only seen small plants. After seeing the mature plants you posted, I'll buy some next time I see them for sale.

You'll really like Y. rigida as it gains size..
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Just remember you'll donate some blood when trimming as well, lol..  One reason i like Y.  rostrata a tad better.  Still, can't beat that Steely Blue color though.

This is a supposed cross between the two, in Desert Botanical's collection..
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amh

Good advice.

The biggest problem with using common names is that the confusion isn't reserved only for within the genus, but can include different families. Just look up how many plants are named mock orange.

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Meangreen94z
4 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

You'll really like Y. rigida as it gains size..
DSCN1627.thumb.JPG.e64d66b30d5f7033e5e4042e0b560fda.JPG


Just remember you'll donate some blood when trimming as well, lol..  One reason i like Y.  rostrata a tad better.  Still, can't beat that Steely Blue color though.

This is a supposed cross between the two, in Desert Botanical's collection..
DSCN3264.thumb.JPG.b13d8d5c1f3ba50517d9e278594b789f.JPG

That cross looks incredible. I’ve heard it occurs naturally.

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amh
3 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

You'll really like Y. rigida as it gains size..

Oh, yes.

4 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Just remember you'll donate some blood when trimming as well, lol.. 

I've had many a puncture wound over the years, but luckily nothing too serious. That hybrid is neat, but I think I would need to see it in person to truly appreciate it.

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Silas_Sancona
3 minutes ago, amh said:

Good advice.

The biggest problem with using common names is that the confusion isn't reserved only for within the genus, but can include different families. Just look up how many plants are named mock orange.

Ain't that the truth, lol  Used to get the stink eye in a few placed i'd worked whenever i referred to/ labeled plants with their Latin/scientific name, before the common name..  

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Silas_Sancona
6 minutes ago, Meangreen94z said:

That cross looks incredible. I’ve heard it occurs naturally.

I'm hoping someone is already.. or starts selling them.. May check in on the garden's specimen soon.

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amh
Just now, Silas_Sancona said:

Ain't that the truth, lol  Used to get the stink eye in a few placed i'd worked whenever i referred to/ labeled plants with their Latin/scientific name, before the common name..  

I'm not opposed to using common names, but if I was working at a nursery or related business, I would require employees and vendors to use the binomial names.

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amh
5 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

I'm hoping someone is already.. or starts selling them.. May check in on the garden's specimen soon.

9e9.gif.6f7f213408dfcbabea9701ab35736f4b.gif

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amh

Does anyone know the true cold hardiness for Hesperoyucca whipplei?

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Silas_Sancona
9 minutes ago, amh said:

I'm not opposed to using common names, but if I was working at a nursery or related business, I would require employees and vendors to use the binomial names.

Agree.. both make sense, and i always explain both to clients.. Trust me, once i finally get my own thing going ( don't get me started, lol ) it will be the #1 " rule of law " that up-to date- binomial names are used, as much as possible, by all.. While not all are easy to pronounce.. most people are already quite familiar with things like  Oleander, Eucalyptus, Bougainvillea.. That's a step in the right direction towards building better confidence in getting your customers/clients more familiarized with more complex names.. Even if you don't always get the name perfect every time.

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