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California native plants


Jubaea_James760

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Post your photos of California natives. If your in other states & have photos, make a new thread of your states natives. It would be really nice to have one of each state. 

Was driving back from SLC Utah & took a little break about 15 minutes south of the Nevada/California border. I just missed a big hillside where there were hundreds if not thousands of California barrel cactus! ( Ferocactus cylindraceus) I'll get photos next time. It was cloudy & drizzling off & on so pics aren't great. Here's some of the species I seen;

Yucca brevifolia. 

These are alot smaller from what I generally see, especially in my area. There dwarfs compared to the big ones. Branching very early making them mature looking but only 6 to 7 feet talk. Some 4 to 5 feet tall & very full. This one had a bunch of babies around it which looked very interesting. 

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Yucca schidigera 

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Yucca baccata ( blue version) 

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Yucca baccata 

green & a very silvery blue next to each other 

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Ferocactus cylindraceus 

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Ferocactus cylindraceus, some we're more orangeish/tan color 

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Hesperia,Southern CA (High Desert area). Zone 8b

Elevation; about 3600 ft.

Lowest temp. I can expect each year 19/20*f lowest since I've been growing palms *13(2007) Hottest temp. Each year *106

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Not sure if this is a Cylindropuntia of some sort or a Echinocereus engelmannii?

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Cylindropuntia echinocarpa? Maybe? 

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Opuntia phaeacantha?

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Hesperia,Southern CA (High Desert area). Zone 8b

Elevation; about 3600 ft.

Lowest temp. I can expect each year 19/20*f lowest since I've been growing palms *13(2007) Hottest temp. Each year *106

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These Ferocactus cylindraceus was growing with something else. I think they're Echinocereus engelmannii? 

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Random shots

 

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Hesperia,Southern CA (High Desert area). Zone 8b

Elevation; about 3600 ft.

Lowest temp. I can expect each year 19/20*f lowest since I've been growing palms *13(2007) Hottest temp. Each year *106

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Last is a little blue bush. It stands out while out there. The blue/silver color is more intense in person, picture doesn't pick it up well. Please identify if you know.

20230531_120503.thumb.jpg.6c3d1ca270a00cb595f572a7e1918791.jpg

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Hesperia,Southern CA (High Desert area). Zone 8b

Elevation; about 3600 ft.

Lowest temp. I can expect each year 19/20*f lowest since I've been growing palms *13(2007) Hottest temp. Each year *106

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6 hours ago, Jubaea_James760 said:

Not sure if this is a Cylindropuntia of some sort or a Echinocereus engelmannii?

20230531_120104.thumb.jpg.88a3eee9f6da41479d16fd56ced35e9f.jpg

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Cylindropuntia echinocarpa? Maybe? 

20230531_120122.thumb.jpg.779b01d048b4d617197b0482cf12f18a.jpg

Opuntia phaeacantha?

20230531_121338.thumb.jpg.2e53c56754d1a6b44ff7b8ee9b9ed781.jpg

 

 

1st 2 shots are E. englemanii w/ maturing fruit on them.. Should be ripe ( Fruit will turn bright red ) in 2-4 weeks..  Some Cylindropuntia in the background of shot #1.

Not entirely sure which Cylindropuntia are in shots 1 and 2.. Density of spines seems less than what you might see on C. echinocarpa, but sometimes that can vary by location / individual clones.. Here's what observations made on iNat appear: https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/49357-Cylindropuntia-echinocarpa  Some other sp. grow in that area so you might look over those also.. 

Prickly Pear ( Opuntia ) looks like O. basilaris to my eye.. O. phaeacantha would be spinier.. typically anyway.. https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/78268-Opuntia-phaeacantha

Great shots, all of them :greenthumb::greenthumb:

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7 hours ago, Jubaea_James760 said:

Last is a little blue bush. It stands out while out there. The blue/silver color is more intense in person, picture doesn't pick it up well. Please identify if you know.

20230531_120503.thumb.jpg.6c3d1ca270a00cb595f572a7e1918791.jpg

Possibly Ephedra nevadensis.. https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/76824-Ephedra-nevadensis   

Fyi: All Ephedra are closely related to Conifers, ( Gymnosperms ) Much like Cycads, rather than flowering plants.   Ephedra itself is also classed in the same group as Welwitschias from Africa ( Class Gnetophytes / Order Welwitschias ) as well..

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North-Central Cal coastal sand dunes

Castilleja foliolosa (wooly Indian paintbrush) in front of Lupinus albifrons (silver bush lupine).

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Silver bush lupine is also mixing with Lupinus arboreus (yellow/coastal bush lupine).

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As well as Eriophyllum staechadifolium (seaside woolly sunflower).

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Artemisia pycnocephala (sandhill sagebrush).

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I believe this is a lanceolate form Dudleya caespitosa (coast dudleya).

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Hesperocyparis/Cupressus Macrocarpa (Monterey cypress). This one hosts an owl.

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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2 hours ago, Rivera said:

Castilleja foliolosa (wooly Indian paintbrush) in front of Lupinus albifrons (silver bush lupine).

PXL_20230603_133014879.thumb.jpg.bc97988d026bb1923ac43f5c25ca71e6.jpg

Upon further reflection, I believe this Indian paintbrush is actually Castilleja affinis ssp. litoralis. 

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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  • 1 month later...

Uvas Canyon Co. Park, Santa Clara Co., CA.  Spring 2013..

Viola pedunculata  ..Yes!  Violets can be yellow  too..  OMG!   -Stop  -everything.. 😱

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Lupinus bicolor

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..And a rare " Pink Elephant "

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Lupinus albifrons.  The particular of albifrons form from this location is cultivated by several Native plant nurseries.

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Delphinium  ...hesperium or decorum.  Flowers are too too dark to be patens, which tends to be more common across the Valley in the Diablos.

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Castillejia  ..maybe foliolos.  Too far inland for affinis. ...or maybe not? 😂

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C. exserta

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Sisyrinchium bellum

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Gilia capitata ..i think..

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..and californica...

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Ranunculus californicus.  Some non flowering Vetch sp. in the picture in the lower right corner.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Plantago maritima (sea plantain/goose tongue)

CA native plantain of the coastal strand, in this case colonizing the median "dune-strip" along upper Great Highway in SF.

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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California poppy super bloom in the Santa Ana mountains along I-15 this past spring 

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A patch of Baccharis pilularis in bloom amidst broken masses of Carpobrotus edulis.

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This variety of coyote brush forms a very low mat over the dune sand, and its leaves are somewhat fleshy.

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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Fat stems on these two Dudleya brittonii in the neighborhood.

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Saw one the other day with an atypically caespitose habit, but neglected to capture a photo. 

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Umbellularia californica 

California bay trees in a coastal redwood forest. Coast live oak, tanoak, madrone, and toyon are also abundant in this area (Wunderlich).

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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And a mighty Pacific madrone from the same area, but closer to the dry foothill side.

Arbutus menziesii

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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  • 1 month later...

Lots of Dudleya farinosa

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Ericameria ericoides

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Castilleja sp. (Probably latifolia, maybe affinis, maybe something else)

IMG_20240103_080446731.thumb.jpg.772e7f111801522ed3d635c5b6a01b75.jpg

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More Dudleya amongst the scrub

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With Artemisia pycnocephala

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Water's edge nearby

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Numenius americanus (most likely) hunting through the wet sand

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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California’s floral diversity is so stunning.  Not to mention certain exotics, like ice plant!  Not sure how u guys feel about that one.  I’d love to see some Ceanothus pics.  My understanding is that the genus has many forms and color hues.

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8 hours ago, CLINODAVE said:

California’s floral diversity is so stunning.  Not to mention certain exotics, like ice plant!  Not sure how u guys feel about that one.  I’d love to see some Ceanothus pics.  My understanding is that the genus has many forms and color hues.

Ceanothus is extremely variable from one location to the next, ranging from groundcover to large shrub, and from tiny hairy leaves to larger glossy leaves. 

The plant below looks like garden variety Ceanothus thyrsiflorus var. griseus 'Yankee Point.' In this case, the species has been reintroduced for the purpose of dune restoration and is vigorous enough to duke it out with the invasive Ammophila surrounding it. 

IMG_20240104_153537276.thumb.jpg.87215f65c11c997f4c2bdc1ead9b944a.jpg

This one looks like 'Ray Hartman'. This is an old photo. Most Ceanothus isn't in bloom yet.

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Some other variety, not sure which but you can see it's quite different.  Leaves are very small and dark, and the plant is only head-high overall.

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As far as ice plant goes, both Carpobrotus edulis and Carpobrotus chilensis are plentiful along the coast. It's safe to say these species are "bad" for the dune ecosystems as they negatively impact reproductive opportunity for native dune plants and reduce biodiversity over time, but there's not much point in hating these invasive plants at this point. Besides producing vibrant flowers, both species are at least exploited by native bumblebees. 

Carpobrotus edulis flower below. 

IMG_20240104_135938686_HDR.thumb.jpg.40167689c3d51c6a7fd860200e677f9c.jpg

Carpobrotus edulis carpeting the bluffs around this small cove full of seals. 

IMG_20240104_135600191.thumb.jpg.0e485bdb32b06882d5da6383428a9220.jpg

Carpobrotus edulis possibly being exploited by native "parasitic" Casilleja sp. below?

IMG_20240104_082425487.thumb.jpg.dd0c039a29d061b9d668eab899d3a275.jpg

Below, Eucalyptus globulus proliferates. This grove grows very close to the water in pure dune sand. The species is adaptable and the trees closest to the water are low and sprawling. Just a hundred feet away, they are tall. These invasive species are notably exploited by native monarch butterflies.

IMG_20240103_102457010.thumb.jpg.91810474f2adf6a31349477b9441d078.jpg

IMG_20240103_102450450.thumb.jpg.7d4cbda4f0df25681cd12e77d97d66fc.jpg

I'd rather have the native species and be rid of the invasives, but I don't see that happening. The state is still full of beautiful and interesting plant communities.

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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5 minutes ago, Rivera said:

Ceanothus is extremely variable from one location to the next, ranging from groundcover to large shrub, and from tiny hairy leaves to larger glossy leaves. 

The plant below looks like garden variety Ceanothus thyrsiflorus var. griseus 'Yankee Point.' In this case, the species has been reintroduced for the purpose of dune restoration and is vigorous enough to duke it out with the invasive Ammophila surrounding it. 

IMG_20240104_153537276.thumb.jpg.87215f65c11c997f4c2bdc1ead9b944a.jpg

This one looks like 'Ray Hartman'. This is an old photo. Most Ceanothus isn't in bloom yet.

PXL_20230312_193926163_MP.thumb.jpg.c53d83a4ded1aa47c6cfa3da16c4ce30.jpg

Some other variety, not sure which but you can see it's quite different.  Leaves are very small and dark, and the plant is only head-high overall.

PXL_20220328_231303878_MP.thumb.jpg.17fd2fa72b9ef70d867d39d12a2da330.jpg

As far as ice plant goes, both Carpobrotus edulis and Carpobrotus chilensis are plentiful along the coast. It's safe to say these species are "bad" for the dune ecosystems as they negatively impact reproductive opportunity for native dune plants and reduce biodiversity over time, but there's not much point in hating these invasive plants at this point. Besides producing vibrant flowers, both species are at least exploited by native bumblebees. 

Carpobrotus edulis flower below. 

IMG_20240104_135938686_HDR.thumb.jpg.40167689c3d51c6a7fd860200e677f9c.jpg

Carpobrotus edulis carpeting the bluffs around this small cove full of seals. 

IMG_20240104_135600191.thumb.jpg.0e485bdb32b06882d5da6383428a9220.jpg

Carpobrotus edulis possibly being exploited by native "parasitic" Casilleja sp. below?

IMG_20240104_082425487.thumb.jpg.dd0c039a29d061b9d668eab899d3a275.jpg

Below, Eucalyptus globulus proliferates. This grove grows very close to the water in pure dune sand. The species is adaptable and the trees closest to the water are low and sprawling. Just a hundred feet away, they are tall. These invasive species are notably exploited by native monarch butterflies.

IMG_20240103_102457010.thumb.jpg.91810474f2adf6a31349477b9441d078.jpg

IMG_20240103_102450450.thumb.jpg.7d4cbda4f0df25681cd12e77d97d66fc.jpg

I'd rather have the native species and be rid of the invasives, but I don't see that happening. The state is still full of beautiful and interesting plant communities.

Funny you brought this up.. Seems like there may be a renewed effort to take out more of these, at least in natural areas. Merc. News article might be behind a paywall ( Usually are when i try to read stories from them. though this one wasn't when i opened it ) Monterey Herald ran essentially the same article as well, if the Merc's article won't open for you.

https://www.mercurynews.com/2024/01/02/eucalyptus-are-one-of-the-states-most-controversial-trees-a-monterey-bay-reserve-may-be-a-model-for-how-to-replace-them/

 

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27 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Funny you brought this up.. Seems like there may be a renewed effort to take out more of these, at least in natural areas. Merc. News article might be behind a paywall ( Usually are when i try to read stories from them. though this one wasn't when i opened it ) Monterey Herald ran essentially the same article as well, if the Merc's article won't open for you.

https://www.mercurynews.com/2024/01/02/eucalyptus-are-one-of-the-states-most-controversial-trees-a-monterey-bay-reserve-may-be-a-model-for-how-to-replace-them/

 

Interesting! 

I observed the most substantial effort to rid an area of an invasive species I've ever seen on the south island of New Zealand where my wife and I spent our honeymoon. 

They weren't after a plant, but rather the infamous and much-maligned European stoat (Mustela erminea). There were many traps on every track we hiked. It's a monumental undertaking, and witnessing it made a lasting impression on me. 

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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1 hour ago, Rivera said:

Interesting! 

I observed the most substantial effort to rid an area of an invasive species I've ever seen on the south island of New Zealand where my wife and I spent our honeymoon. 

They weren't after a plant, but rather the infamous and much-maligned European stoat (Mustela erminea). There were many traps on every track we hiked. It's a monumental undertaking, and witnessing it made a lasting impression on me. 

As much as i fondly remember both walking among a grove of them behind my neighborhood back in San Jose, ..and the Monarch - covered trees at Natural Bridges / in Capitola as a kid,  i do agree that balancing things ..with the obvious lean in favor of our natives.. is the best idea when managing invasive ..or highly aggressive non natives..  Keep some of the oldest Euc. groves, both for the animals that have adjusted to using them, and as a way to teach a bit of not so wisely thought out Horticultural angled California history,  but remove them where they take up habitat that should be restored to as natural a state as is possible in today's reality.

Interesting too to see how other countries handle invasive plants / animals. We fret wayy too much over controlling non native Rat or Feral Cat issues, ..or even Buffel Grass here, while other places take a less soft pawed ..more hard reality based approach to curbing the effects related to allowing highly invasive non natives to continue disrupting and eliminating native wildlife. No, as it relates to Cats, it shouldn't have come to some of the less appealing control measures some places have employed, but, that's what happens when it has to.

Just look at the back and forth related to a recent story regarding more Wolves being released back into Colorado ..A good thing to help bring balance to overpopulation among Deer, Elk, other " prey " animals,  right?  

Was a story the following day related to how some ranchers in Wyoming were already telling officials they'd kill any wolves that wandered across the state line into Wyoming, and onto their land.

All because said rancher's  are afraid that a Cow or Sheep might occasionally get picked off.   ..And yet, " Zombie " or Chronic Wasting Disease  ( CWD ), a Prion / Protein associated Neurological illness,  which is in the same family as Mad Cow Disease, and effects both Elk and Deer, esp. in areas where populations are too dense,  continues to spread ..in Wyoming  ...likely slowly spreading into other areas where it hasn't been detected yet in the Western U.S.. 🤷‍♂️🤦‍♂️      Anyhow..

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  • 2 weeks later...

This Dudleya is being sold as Dudleya caespitosa. It's size and lack of clustering habit suggests brittonii, but it looks more like a hybrid of the two.

IMG_20240116_101505545.thumb.jpg.246a900bfba6e93fd443421d5fae18b5.jpg

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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On 1/18/2024 at 7:34 AM, Rivera said:

This Dudleya is being sold as Dudleya caespitosa. It's size and lack of clustering habit suggests brittonii, but it looks more like a hybrid of the two.

IMG_20240116_101505545.thumb.jpg.246a900bfba6e93fd443421d5fae18b5.jpg

I'd put my money on it being a pure D. brittonii. Since they're native to the coastal region near the border, these are almost as common as Echeveria in the San Diego area. There are some hybrids in cultivation, but they're not sold very often.

Hi 76°, Lo 43°

Edited by Tom in Tucson
I f'ed up
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Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

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7 hours ago, Tom in Tucson said:

I'd put my money on it being a pure D. brittonii. Since they're native to the coastal region near the border, these are almost as common as Echeveria in the San Diego area. There are some hybrids in cultivation, but they're not sold very often.

Hi 76°, Lo 43°

You're right, I think I only have one that I can say pretty certainly is a hybrid and I bought it as such. 

Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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