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Coconuts


bubba

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Plenty of activity on this board discussing Cocos nucifera. Thought it might be good to add a thread where they are ubiquitous:

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What you look for is what is looking

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What you look for is what is looking

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What you look for is what is looking

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What you look for is what is looking

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What you look for is what is looking

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What you look for is what is looking

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What you look for is what is looking

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What you look for is what is looking

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What you look for is what is looking

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What you look for is what is looking

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Here is one more windswept at sunset look, with a few other species photobombing.

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They grow all over the place here.

 

 

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18n. Hot, humid and salty coastal conditions.

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FPlant guy, What was the location of the picture?
 

Brian, Can you tell me where Michoacán is in Mexico? Beautiful photo and they have hills!

What you look for is what is looking

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I am at the marriott harbour beach in ft lauderdale. Perfect weather outside but these tourist spots are freezing cold inside!  Port everglades, cruise ships, and tan sand! Its been nice, they are quite adept with succulents too. A few other palms too in front, satake i think, and vietchias, solitaires, bismarks not pictured, and kentiopsis maybe?

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Cool! Thank you!

What you look for is what is looking

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Older picture of Cocos nucifera against the sunset:

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What you look for is what is looking

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Gorgeous pics of South Florida's coconuts!  I was a kid in the 70s when lethal yellowing swept thru and decimated coconut populations in my relatives' Coral Gables neighborhood.  Dwarf coconuts were planted to replace the Jamaica Talls, but they never seemed to capture the atmosphere of the taller trees.  Current pics show a return to taller trees.  What is the status of lethal yellowing and resistant trees in S. Florida these days?

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Clino,

If you were in the Gables during the 70’s, it was truly Armageddon! Those were some horribly ugly days. Today we see all varieties of coconuts, thankfully, not limited to dwarfs. Of course, we are talking 50+ years!

This does not mean that there are not disease culprits out there because there are. However, things are likely going back to your memory of the Gables there before the advent of LY. LV is no longer an issue but it seems that all Palm related material continues to mention it ad nauseaum.

 

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Same resort, a naturalized cocos on the edge of the sand in the sea grapes.  Not sure if they will allow it to stay and block the view, its in a spot that could happen but the sabal nearby is taller and still there.

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They Were Expendable...in 1945, long before Lethal Yellowing reared its head, John Ford captured the days when 'Jamaican Tall' ruled Key Biscayne. Yowza!

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Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 287 ft | z10a | avg Jan 43/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899); previously Los Angeles, California (multiple locations)

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13 hours ago, bubba said:

FPlant guy, What was the location of the picture?
 

Brian, Can you tell me where Michoacán is in Mexico? Beautiful photo and they have hills!

Michoacan is on the west coast not far from Ixtapa - Zihuatanejo. The sierra madre mountains come right down to the coast creating a very rugged coastline in the state.

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18n. Hot, humid and salty coastal conditions.

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Today I visited a local coconut processing plant to pick up some coco coir. Here are some of the husk waiting to be processed. 
 

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18n. Hot, humid and salty coastal conditions.

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The smallest size of coco coir they sell is 1.10m3 and weighs about 150 kilos. I wanted to take take photos of them processing the husk into coco coir but they didn’t want me taking pictures. Here’s the coco coir at home in the garage. They probably had a 100 of these bundles ready to ship. 
 

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18n. Hot, humid and salty coastal conditions.

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20 minutes ago, Brian said:

Today I visited a local coconut processing plant to pick up some coco coir. Here are some of the husk waiting to be processed. 
 

IMG_8913.jpeg

 

6 minutes ago, Brian said:

The smallest size of coco coir they sell is 1.10m3 and weighs about 150 kilos. I wanted to take take photos of them processing the husk into coco coir but they didn’t want me taking pictures. Here’s the coco coir at home in the garage. They probably had a 100 of these bundles ready to ship. 
 

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:greenthumb:

How much to ship that up here to Arizona? 😁 ..Kidding of course.  Use tons of the stuff in soil mixes.  Sold here  but in much smaller sizes.

Did not realize Mexico was processing it now. Pretty sure most of what is sold up here comes from S.E. Asia.. Sourced directly from Mexico would be great.

Used extensively in the potted plant industry down there?

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10 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

 

:greenthumb:

How much to ship that up here to Arizona? 😁 ..Kidding of course.  Use tons of the stuff in soil mixes.  Sold here  but in much smaller sizes.

Did not realize Mexico was processing it now. Pretty sure most of what is sold up here comes from S.E. Asia.. Sourced directly from Mexico would be great.

Used extensively in the potted plant industry down there?

They say that most of it goes to gardening to I imagine it’s the potted plant industry. 
Several years ago most of the husk was used to fire cure bricks but now I know of three coco coir processing plants in the area. It’s nice to see them maximizing this local resource. 

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18n. Hot, humid and salty coastal conditions.

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16 minutes ago, Brian said:

They say that most of it goes to gardening to I imagine it’s the potted plant industry. 
Several years ago most of the husk was used to fire cure bricks but now I know of three coco coir processing plants in the area. It’s nice to see them maximizing this local resource. 

Agreed,  It's a great, sustainable alternative to Peat Moss and the chunky stuff is great for potted Orchids..  Noting all the Coconut plantations along the coast from around San Blas and south of Puerto Vallarta when looking at stuff on Google street view, i'd wondered what was done w/ all the husks after harvesting / processing.

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Red nuts of a Red Spicata at ANSG:

0FE941AE-B0E6-4F78-A383-C3BD50F061A0.thumb.jpeg.805661408b7531ac47689dc99cfce9b8.jpeg

What you look for is what is looking

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What you look for is what is looking

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