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What palms grow in Brisbane, AU?


GottmitAlex

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Just curious. I know Sydney is at 32°S (give or take) and Brisbane 27°S.  9 hour drive between each other.   

I wonder what palms do people grow in Brisbane. 

 

Thanks

 

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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I don't live in Brisbane, but it's roughly at the same (equivalent) latitude as Florida, but without the once-in-20-year Arctic cold catastrophes. I've been there a few times, and I saw bananas and palm trees that would be at home in Florida. I assume that anything that grows in Central or South Florida should be able to be grown in SE Queensland. I know that just south of Queensland, in New South Wales (near present-day Lismore), there was the largest subtropical lowland rainforest, and it included many species of plants and animals that are otherwise entirely restricted to the tropics, including a type of bird of paradise and a type birdwing butterfly. There's a great book about the SE Qld/NE NSW rainforest: https://boolarongpress.com.au/product/the-magic-of-mary-cairnscross-scenic-reserve/

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With a bit of searching you should be able to find a species list for Mt Coot tha Botanical Gardens, on the outskirts of Brisbane. Excellent subtropical garden, with a wonderful diverse palm collection l.

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9 minutes ago, Yunder Wækraus said:

I don't live in Brisbane, but it's roughly at the same (equivalent) latitude as Florida, but without the once-in-20-year Arctic cold catastrophes. I've been there a few times, and I saw bananas and palm trees that would be at home in Florida. I assume that anything that grows in Central or South Florida should be able to be grown in SE Queensland. I know that just south of Queensland, in New South Wales (near present-day Lismore), there was the largest subtropical lowland rainforest, and it included many species of plants and animals that are otherwise entirely restricted to the tropics, including a type of bird of paradise and a type birdwing butterfly. There's a great book about the SE Qld/NE NSW rainforest: https://boolarongpress.com.au/product/the-magic-of-mary-cairnscross-scenic-reserve/

SE Florida is warmer because of latitude but mainly due to the fact Florida's a peninsula, surrounded by very warm waters for its latitude. 

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2 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Just curious. I know Sydney is at 32°S (give or take) and Brisbane 27°S.  9 hour drive between each other.   

I wonder what palms do people grow in Brisbane. 

 

Thanks

 

Ive never been to brisbane but I've been to Surfers Paradise + Coolangatta (Gold Coast) area, and the hinterland+ the rainforests in NE NSW and SE QLD on the coast I saw a lot of coconuts, Royals, large spindles, robusta + hybrids, a lot of adonidia, areca, some more obscure palms, alot of dypsis/chrysalidocarpus especially decaryi and ocassionally decipens, of course naturally the most common palms were Arctonophoenix and Wodetyia, I saw a variety of Arctonophoenix in the developed areas, even a few purpuea, but in the forests, the alexandre were very common, large and beautiful, in the homes around that area there were lots of royals, wodetyia, washingtonia etc, it wasn't until you got out of the mountains that you saw the more tropical stuff suprisingly, I saw insane amounts of mature majesty palms, only in the mountain areas/towns, they weren't too common in the city and coast

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Lucas

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It’s probably easier to ask what doesn’t grow in Brisbane.  It’s really only the ultra-tropicals like C renda (although I’ve heard of some success for periods in Brisbane) and Manicaria that wouldn’t survive the winter. On the other end of the spectrum, some really high elevation and heat intolerant species won’t grow (Juania, Lepidorrachis, some Ceroxylon etc). Even things like Jubaea, Parajubaea, Hedyscepe and Rhopalostylis have been known to grow in SE QLD if given favourable positions. 

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Tim Brisbane

Patterson Lakes, bayside Melbourne, Australia

Rarely Frost

2005 Minimum: 2.6C,  Maximum: 44C

2005 Average: 17.2C, warmest on record.

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12 minutes ago, tim_brissy_13 said:

t’s really only the ultra-tropicals like C renda (although I’ve heard of some success for periods in Brisbane)

Do you know if they would survive in Cairns area?

Lucas

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Maybe the better question is what palm DOESN'T GROW in Brisbane?

You have a climate that makes slap ourselves in So-Cal.

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Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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53 minutes ago, Little Tex said:

Do you know if they would survive in Cairns area?

C renda thrives in Cairns, along with just about all palms that like the wet tropics. 

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Tim Brisbane

Patterson Lakes, bayside Melbourne, Australia

Rarely Frost

2005 Minimum: 2.6C,  Maximum: 44C

2005 Average: 17.2C, warmest on record.

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2 hours ago, Little Tex said:

Do you know if they would survive in Cairns area?

Cairns is in the tropics and has a humid climate with native rainforest. There is no tropical rainforest species that cannot be grown in Cairns.

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Okay people, I actually live in Brisbane so of course I know everything ! South Eastern Qld is a multitude of microclimates. Within Brisbane itself there are 3 climates.  Along the coastal strip suburbs most things apart from ultra tropicals or very cool climate palms live happily. The western suburbs tend to have much cooler winter nights and higher summer temperature days. Winter nights go down to single figures, occasionally into the minuses and there can be a frost event every few years that is lethal to the delicate plants. The inland areas get regular frosts and only the tough stuff survives there, unless you live high up on a big hill or have a protective microclimate. Mt Coot-tha botanic gardens are on a very high hill (Mt Coot-tha in fact) and only 4 klms from the Brisbane CBD. My house is 20 minutes drive from there but palms I see thriving there wouldn't have a hope at my place. Geographic location has the final say on what you can and cannot grow here.

Peachy

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I came. I saw. I purchased

 

 

27.35 south.

Warm subtropical, with occasional frosts.

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5 hours ago, DoomsDave said:

Maybe the better question is what palm DOESN'T GROW in Brisbane?

You have a climate that makes slap ourselves in So-Cal.

What palm doesn't grow in Brisbane ? Well if it is singularly beautiful, has pretty colours or some other appealing features, is virtually impossible to obtain and costs a fortune if you do happen to find one, I can guarantee 100% that it will croak on the first very hot day or the first very cold night.

Peachy

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I came. I saw. I purchased

 

 

27.35 south.

Warm subtropical, with occasional frosts.

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4 hours ago, peachy said:

What palm doesn't grow in Brisbane ? Well if it is singularly beautiful, has pretty colours or some other appealing features, is virtually impossible to obtain and costs a fortune if you do happen to find one, I can guarantee 100% that it will croak on the first very hot day or the first very cold night.

Peachy

You’re right about that . Southern California has a pretty decent palm environment. We always want what we can’t grow! I visited a quirky kind of guy on Kuaii who had an amazing collection of palms that I could only dream of. I said the same thing to him . He said well , where you are you have those beautiful Washingtonia Robusta and Howea Foresteriana grow like weeds! Here on the Islands we struggle with the Kentia’s and can’t grow the Washies. I will say , I would gladly trade my Washingtonia for a Licuala any day! Harry

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I was going to start a thread about some recent palm adventures around Brisbane, but I'll just add some photos to this one instead...these are all from the Brisbane City Gardens, the original Botanic Gardens ...I'll post some more fromthe other Botanic Gardens and parks around town as well...

 

Beccariophoenix fenestralis

DSC_5794.thumb.jpg.8e2bae36e740f5e1ad759bc2f464000d.jpg

Jubaea

DSC_5804.thumb.jpg.06b92f5cadc1e4e6a5e3982eba1fd84f.jpg

Carpoxylon

DSC_5786.thumb.jpg.bfcb4d83abf95df9ee88c0c6680ed613.jpg

Various Areca catechu and vestiaria

DSC_5826.thumb.jpg.f36022b1b98250fe4ab7516ffa4b2855.jpg

Hydriastele

DSC_5820.thumb.jpg.786310bc05a247cc8c21e4e710d0cd1a.jpg

 

Pinanga coronata

DSC_5833.thumb.jpg.0b23cf7995016f6d037e80f6d834207d.jpg

Jubaeopsis caffra

DSC_5791.thumb.jpg.1e74a1c330c76c9375476529eb2d4deb.jpg

 

Livistona mariae

DSC_5736.thumb.jpg.dc7f86bb76ec478895a8ff0475f52498.jpg

Areca catechu yellow form

DSC_5754.thumb.jpg.70c684df1c8a6becfc56053fc473636f.jpg

Metroxylon

DSC_5777.thumb.jpg.25d7bb26450e84e93ce6a4262c9f5ac2.jpg

 

Bentinckia nicobarica

DSC_5806.thumb.jpg.e14187a7b874298f6f64fb0cf0ccebfc.jpg

 

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Gold Coast, Queensland Latitude 28S. Mild, Humid Subtropical climate. Rainfall - not consistent enough!

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Chambeyronias

DSC_5809.thumb.jpg.08198b05171ff6e6420fbddf1baeab9b.jpg

 

A young circle of Adonidia growing inthe middle of a ver old circle of Roystonea

DSC_5817.thumb.jpg.b7cd2413358056397af6694aaf9dab04.jpg

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Gold Coast, Queensland Latitude 28S. Mild, Humid Subtropical climate. Rainfall - not consistent enough!

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A few from Roma Street Parklands...plenty more things growing than what you see in the photos...but here are a few selections

 

Clinostigma and friends

DSC_0205.thumb.jpg.b1d134d461dd6f16403e80f27037913d.jpg

 

Burretiokentia hapala

 

DSC_0180.thumb.jpg.037eb7060657bbe83a4281b9745d916c.jpg

 

Chrysalidocarpus carlsmithii

DSC_0194.thumb.jpg.683af4d2d8e0b56a46e6d57cb2ec32a8.jpg

Thrinax parviflora

DSC_0212.thumb.jpg.400d9002275f56d88599b549430ffae3.jpg

 

DSC_0152.thumb.jpg.2d1f31d601aaeb5eee2fa63367fa1dd6.jpg

Foxy Ladies

DSC_0166.thumb.jpg.971587ac7e1509a017621552e4a33f2a.jpg

Dypsis 'Amboza'

DSC_0179.thumb.jpg.af4ba9ae401a6f2d685a9c2087c7a73c.jpg

Kentiopsis oliviformis

DSC_0177.thumb.jpg.544d82209fda2ce0c595326f6736ff6c.jpg

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Gold Coast, Queensland Latitude 28S. Mild, Humid Subtropical climate. Rainfall - not consistent enough!

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Would it not be possible to grow a C.Renda in coastal areas? All the palms here look great:)

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17 hours ago, peachy said:

What palm doesn't grow in Brisbane ? Well if it is singularly beautiful, has pretty colours or some other appealing features, is virtually impossible to obtain and costs a fortune if you do happen to find one, I can guarantee 100% that it will croak on the first very hot day or the first very cold night.

Peachy

Thanks Darl!

But, based on what I’ve seen in this thread, you all at least put in more effort.

Gonna have to visit there one of these days, and bask in true palminess! In fact AND spirit!

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Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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16 hours ago, Cluster said:

Would it not be possible to grow a C.Renda in coastal areas? All the palms here look great:)

C. Rendas are very very sensitive to cold, below about 50 F. I think where you are is too cold, unless you have a greenhouse. They're seriously tropical palms. It's too cold here in California or even in places like Miami. Just a whiff of cold and they just die. That's why houseplant growers gave up on them here.

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Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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2 hours ago, Cluster said:

@DoomsDave I thought there were some in Miami and in that regard maybe some could be found in Brisbane as well?

:)

They're street trees in Cairns :)

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3 hours ago, Cluster said:

@DoomsDave I thought there were some in Miami and in that regard maybe some could be found in Brisbane as well?

:)

I have seen photos of ones in the Miami Beach area.

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5 hours ago, Cluster said:

@DoomsDave I thought there were some in Miami and in that regard maybe some could be found in Brisbane as well?

:)

None in Miami. People tried, the palms died, the people cried.

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Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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3 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

None in Miami. People tried, the palms died, the people cried.

there was another thread I can't find where someone had a heated trashcan underground and grew them or something like that.

 

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Lucas

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45 minutes ago, Little Tex said:

there was another thread I can't find where someone had a heated trashcan underground and grew them or something like that.

 

Oh, that must have been Mardy Darian in California. He experimented with his C. renda, exposing them to colder and colder temperatures, intending to breed the survivors as a more cold-hardy C. renda. Except he eventually exposed the last of them to too much cold and that eliminated the rest. He had heat cables in the ground, but it seems to me it might have been a different palm in the trash can. Anyone remember? He was quite a character and absolutely obsessed with zone pushing. Honestly for a palm that loves warmth, it was odd he was growing them in the shade of his house, giving them mostly north exposure. He ought to have put them in the pool room with his coconut!

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Kim Cyr

Between the beach and the bays, Point Loma, San Diego, California USA
and on a 300 year-old lava flow, Pahoa, Hawaii, 1/4 mile from the 2018 flow
All characters  in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

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19 hours ago, Little Tex said:

there was another thread I can't find where someone had a heated trashcan underground and grew them or something like that.

 

Are we sure this is Miami? Dave says they try and end up dying there,  in any case it seems a bit young to take any conclusions about medium/long term survivability.

If we find that some people are indeed able to grow them in South Florida (not counting the Keys), then it is probably a matter of time till someone finds a spot in coastal Brisbane.

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35 minutes ago, Cluster said:

Are we sure this is Miami? Dave says they try and end up dying there,  in any case it seems a bit young to take any conclusions about medium/long term survivability.

If we find that some people are indeed able to grow them in South Florida (not counting the Keys), then it is probably a matter of time till someone finds a spot in coastal Brisbane.

I don't think there's any normal version where these grow in Florida outside the Keys (and I'm willing to bet they're extremely iffy in the Keys over a 50-year period), and there is definitely not one where they're gonna make it Brisbane. It's fun to zone-push palms, obviously, but after living in Cairns for 6 years I can really see the difference between subtropical Florida and the true tropics. There is not, never has been, and never will be a freeze near sea level on the coast at my current latitude. We have ceiling-wax palms planted as street trees on a portion of the highway, and they even planted them as ornamental palms on every lot in our development! If you can't guarantee mangosteen and/or ceiling-wax palms over a 50-year period, you're in a marginal climate for the true tropicals.

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Too bad then:(. In any case you can grow almost everything in Florida and Brisbane, not much to complain! They are also hard to maintain I heard, need constant water, some people seem to put them in ponds. 

 

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C'mon guys, someone argued with me for two months straight that Miami is tropical. Köppen says so.

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On 2/16/2024 at 7:52 AM, Cluster said:

@DoomsDave I thought there were some in Miami and in that regard maybe some could be found in Brisbane as well?

:)

If there are a couple of mild winters in succession they can survive a couple of years but never much longer. Nurseries sell them and assure people they are buying a new improved variety (at a bargain price of $350 )knowing full well that they don't stand a chance of living in Brisbane.  People seem to view Brisbane as some kind of paradise when in fact it's a shabby place, dreadful roads (or major lack thereof) poor public transport, nothing open after 5pm and suffers badly from extreme weather events.

Peachy

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I came. I saw. I purchased

 

 

27.35 south.

Warm subtropical, with occasional frosts.

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Cyrtostachys renda needs warmth primarily in the root-zone. The best specimens in the Keys are growing in ponds. This is very important...it is a clustering palm and a large clump may have sufficient energy to throw up suckers even after the tops have died...not sure if this has ever been documented, however. There are specimens that have been multi-year successful in Miami Beach and the other barrier islands, which are significantly warmer than Miami city. 

I had a Cyrtostachys renda planted on Big Pine Key and it grew beautifully, including the all-time low I experienced there in 12 years...48F, below 50F for four hours. And there was no damage whatsoever. Unfortunately Irma threw almost five feet of ocean over the ground for about 24 hours and this blackened the thing. However, the hybrid that was available some years ago (I believe these mainly came from seed at Pauleen Sullivan's Hawai'i property, where she had the two species planted adjacently...now buried under 40 feet of lava) was planted nearby and lasted the better part of a year after that storm, until it finally died, probably from slow dehydration due to the high salt levels in the soil. The specimen at the Hemingway House in Key West did just fine...but it is sitting in nice warm water. I think it also survived the 41F in 2010, under the same treatment. But the hybrid, if you can locate one, would be the one for Brisbane or similar.

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Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 287 ft | z10a | avg Jan 43/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899); previously Los Angeles, California (multiple locations)

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2 hours ago, SeanK said:

C'mon guys, someone argued with me for two months straight that Miami is tropical. Köppen says so.

lol--it has a tropical climate, but it's not in the tropics. None of the lower 48 has even one square mile in the tropics, sadly, though Key West gets mighty close.

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10 minutes ago, mnorell said:

Cyrtostachys renda needs warmth primarily in the root-zone. The best specimens in the Keys are growing in ponds. This is very important...it is a clustering palm and a large clump may have sufficient energy to throw up suckers even after the tops have died...not sure if this has ever been documented, however. There are specimens that have been multi-year successful in Miami Beach and the other barrier islands, which are significantly warmer than Miami city. 

I had a Cyrtostachys renda planted on Big Pine Key and it grew beautifully, including the all-time low I experienced there in 12 years...48F, below 50F for four hours. And there was no damage whatsoever. Unfortunately Irma threw almost five feet of ocean over the ground for about 24 hours and this blackened the thing. However, the hybrid that was available some years ago (I believe these mainly came from seed at Pauleen Sullivan's Hawai'i property, where she had the two species planted adjacently...now buried under 40 feet of lava) was planted nearby and lasted the better part of a year after that storm, until it finally died, probably from slow dehydration due to the high salt levels in the soil. The specimen at the Hemingway House in Key West did just fine...but it is sitting in nice warm water. I think it also survived the 41F in 2010, under the same treatment. But the hybrid, if you can locate one, would be the one for Brisbane or similar.

We've definitely had at least a few nights over the past 6 years here in Cairns with lows in the high 40s to low 50s, though I cannot confirm it truly got below 50 in my neighborhood. I think I remember seeing some damage on the leaves of the ceiling-wax palms planted in the meridian of the highway in town, but it could have also been damage from all the exhaust, or wind, or anything else. None in our neighborhood have ever shown any signs of damage. (We're north of Cairns in Kewarra Beach.)

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On 2/15/2024 at 12:43 AM, Daryl said:

A few from Roma Street Parklands...plenty more things growing than what you see in the photos...but here are a few selections

 

Clinostigma and friends

DSC_0205.thumb.jpg.b1d134d461dd6f16403e80f27037913d.jpg

 

Burretiokentia hapala

 

DSC_0180.thumb.jpg.037eb7060657bbe83a4281b9745d916c.jpg

 

Chrysalidocarpus carlsmithii

DSC_0194.thumb.jpg.683af4d2d8e0b56a46e6d57cb2ec32a8.jpg

Thrinax parviflora

DSC_0212.thumb.jpg.400d9002275f56d88599b549430ffae3.jpg

 

DSC_0152.thumb.jpg.2d1f31d601aaeb5eee2fa63367fa1dd6.jpg

Foxy Ladies

DSC_0166.thumb.jpg.971587ac7e1509a017621552e4a33f2a.jpg

Dypsis 'Amboza'

DSC_0179.thumb.jpg.af4ba9ae401a6f2d685a9c2087c7a73c.jpg

Kentiopsis oliviformis

DSC_0177.thumb.jpg.544d82209fda2ce0c595326f6736ff6c.jpg

Ah Daryl is the man to ask a walking encyclopaedia of Palms that can grow In south east Queensland 

Old Beach ,Hobart
Tasmania ,Australia. 42 " south
Cool Maritime climate

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On 2/13/2024 at 9:33 PM, DoomsDave said:

Maybe the better question is what palm DOESN'T GROW in Brisbane?

You have a climate that makes slap ourselves in So-Cal.

The washingtonia filifera does not seem to tolerate humid climates well ... especially frost-free humid areas like on the Queensland coast. Same goes for other "desert/dryland" palm species. So that's one group of palms that SoCal can best Brisbane in 😉

For similar reasons, I could imagine extremely cold hardy palms like trachycarpus fortunei or rhapidophyllum hystrix struggling in Brisbane.

And, of course, if the "ultratropical" species are as sensitive as people say that they are, then those would be another challenge in the Brisbane area (especially away from the immediate shoreline).

Edited by _nevi
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4 hours ago, _nevi said:

...I could imagine extremely cold hardy palms like trachycarpus fortunei or rhapidophyllum hystrix struggling in Brisbane...

Rhapidophyllum would thrive in Brisbane. It loves heat and humidity...puts up with extreme cold in its northern reaches, and yet grows beautifully in Miami, which is much warmer than Brisbane. If I remember correctly, someone once posted a picture of one in one of the highly tropical botanical gardens in Thailand, Singapore or similar.

As far as Trachycarpus fortunei goes, they certainly seem less adaptable than Rhapidophyllum as far as winter warmth goes, but I think it would be fine there as well. Looking at the numbers, Brisbane winters are coolish overall, with modestly warm daytime highs. I think T. fortunei would have more of a problem in places where winters are about 10F warmer in winter than Brisbane (which has temps of about 49F/69F at the nadir...just a few degrees warmer than much of SoCal). Summers are also rather cooler  (71F/84F at the zenith) than would be a problem for Trachies, which thrive in the heat and humidity of the American Deep South (usually in the neighborhood of 75F/93F within 100 miles of the Gulf of Mexico). I imagine a reason for their scarcity in Queensland may be more a problem with the gardening public...most of whom would no doubt much prefer to plant a Coccothrinax or a Licuala than a Trachycarpus! And can you blame them? 

But I do think Trachies might balk at the temps in Darwin...

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Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 287 ft | z10a | avg Jan 43/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899); previously Los Angeles, California (multiple locations)

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On 2/19/2024 at 3:20 AM, _nevi said:

The washingtonia filifera does not seem to tolerate humid climates well ... especially frost-free humid areas like on the Queensland coast. Same goes for other "desert/dryland" palm species. So that's one group of palms that SoCal can best Brisbane in 😉

For similar reasons, I could imagine extremely cold hardy palms like trachycarpus fortunei or rhapidophyllum hystrix struggling in Brisbane.

And, of course, if the "ultratropical" species are as sensitive as people say that they are, then those would be another challenge in the Brisbane area (especially away from the immediate shoreline).

Almost on the money...😄

Believe it or not there are quite a few mature 'true' filifera's growing here. Same for Rhapidophyllum hystrix...no issues there...Trachycarpus fortunei, however, just about all the old ones I have seen could be classed as 'dwarfs' LOL. But if you drive to the mountains an hour south of Brisbane you will see them growing to perfection.  As Peachy mentioned before, the microclimates here vary substantially.   As for ultratropical, correct,  things like Cyrtostachys renda will not establish and survive long term in the ground. They grow perfectly well as a potted patio palm, but put their rootball in the ground and they die...soil temps stay too cool in the winter. There is always hope though 🙂 . The hybrid is easy here though. There are quite a few 'ultras' that give us a challenge!  

The biggest issue to growing palms in Brisbane is the prolonged drought periods we get some years. Keeping them watered is a challenge.

 

 

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Gold Coast, Queensland Latitude 28S. Mild, Humid Subtropical climate. Rainfall - not consistent enough!

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Here's a few more Brisbane palms...

 

Copernicia macroglossa

DSC_4152.thumb.jpg.ae323f50cf3aa5b6691c2bb9cd339d0f.jpg

Ptychosperma sp.

DSC_4219.thumb.jpg.ea0de4f6f1eca95d8c655313512287d1.jpg

Calamus sp.

DSC_4222.thumb.jpg.4224396fe7adfbdfbf9cdee72f7464e0.jpg

Orania palindan

DSC_4226.thumb.jpg.e26c5d9c9a1606b72de38701232d95dd.jpg

Pinanga densiflora

DSC_4248.thumb.jpg.58d778168c9aff3f5b53eddd308a8a5c.jpg

Copernicia fallaense

DSC_5835.thumb.jpg.7b1ddb00ce0f93ea8d9606e63438edb0.jpg

Sabinaria magnifica

DSC_5885.thumb.jpg.a32c7da68df70d42d62866f56dff49a1.jpg

Young Clinostigma samoense

DSC_5917.thumb.jpg.4a05fe004e03c843173aaa08c6482770.jpg

 

 

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Gold Coast, Queensland Latitude 28S. Mild, Humid Subtropical climate. Rainfall - not consistent enough!

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On 2/18/2024 at 4:08 PM, mnorell said:

Rhapidophyllum would thrive in Brisbane. It loves heat and humidity...puts up with extreme cold in its northern reaches, and yet grows beautifully in Miami, which is much warmer than Brisbane. If I remember correctly, someone once posted a picture of one in one of the highly tropical botanical gardens in Thailand, Singapore or similar.

As far as Trachycarpus fortunei goes, they certainly seem less adaptable than Rhapidophyllum as far as winter warmth goes, but I think it would be fine there as well. Looking at the numbers, Brisbane winters are coolish overall, with modestly warm daytime highs. I think T. fortunei would have more of a problem in places where winters are about 10F warmer in winter than Brisbane (which has temps of about 49F/69F at the nadir...just a few degrees warmer than much of SoCal). Summers are also rather cooler  (71F/84F at the zenith) than would be a problem for Trachies, which thrive in the heat and humidity of the American Deep South (usually in the neighborhood of 75F/93F within 100 miles of the Gulf of Mexico). I imagine a reason for their scarcity in Queensland may be more a problem with the gardening public...most of whom would no doubt much prefer to plant a Coccothrinax or a Licuala than a Trachycarpus! And can you blame them? 

But I do think Trachies might balk at the temps in Darwin...

Would you say that the raphidophyllum hystrix specimens in Miami grow more beautifully than those in the colder winter, northern portions of their SE US range? When I brought up that species, as well as trachycarpus fortunei, I was thinking more along the lines of if there were "chilling hour requirements" and such for those palms — if so, then that would be a factor that retards growth (if not outright declines) in warm, frost-free Brisbane (and Miami) ... whereas in colder winter areas of the American Deep South, the cold spells can be enough to satisfy the "chilling requirements" despite the summer heat and humidity. 

But yes, raphidophyllum hystrix does thrive better in heat and humidity, with trachycarpus fortunei looking less adaptable. And, of course, aesthetic preferences of archontophoenixcoccothrinax, licuala, etc can also dictate the commonality of those palms compared to the hardier species (in addition to any sourcing factors).

 

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On 2/13/2024 at 7:27 PM, Yunder Wækraus said:

I don't live in Brisbane, but it's roughly at the same (equivalent) latitude as Florida, but without the once-in-20-year Arctic cold catastrophes. I've been there a few times, and I saw bananas and palm trees that would be at home in Florida. I assume that anything that grows in Central or South Florida should be able to be grown in SE Queensland. I know that just south of Queensland, in New South Wales (near present-day Lismore), there was the largest subtropical lowland rainforest, and it included many species of plants and animals that are otherwise entirely restricted to the tropics, including a type of bird of paradise and a type birdwing butterfly. There's a great book about the SE Qld/NE NSW rainforest: https://boolarongpress.com.au/product/the-magic-of-mary-cairnscross-scenic-reserve/

Based upon what I saw on the publisher's site, what a beautiful book!

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