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Palms for inland socal


Norik

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Hello, 

I apologize in advance as I wasn’t sure which thread to post this question under as I’m new here. I would like to add around 8 unique and different palm species to my landscaping. 5 in full sun, 2 in partial sun ( gets sun in the evening 1pm-5pm), and 1 in a shaded area. I see common palms such as queens, dates, Pygmy’s ect. and would like to add something totally different to the landscaping that would do well here. I’ve had success in growing lots of tropicals such as coffee plants, Starfruit, mango, & sugar cane all outdoors year round. I live in Riverside (Inland California, Zone 9b). 

Thanks!

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Welcome to the group neighbor !! 
nice to see some more riverside growers! So what part of riverside are you in? You have tons and tons of options . Just depends on what you like.  I’m growing lots of stuff that I would have never thought would grow here . But then again depends on parts of riverside . Ive got a pretty nice microclimate here . Situated slightly above the California state citrus park . Rule of thumb for me has been most fan palm species do best for me in full sun and most the other feather pinnate style dypsis archontophoenix chambeyronia all Prefer slight shade for me . If you’re ever interested in seeing what you can grow shoot me a message I’m always open for fellow growers to come by . 

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7 hours ago, Norik said:

Hello, 

I apologize in advance as I wasn’t sure which thread to post this question under as I’m new here. I would like to add around 8 unique and different palm species to my landscaping. 5 in full sun, 2 in partial sun ( gets sun in the evening 1pm-5pm), and 1 in a shaded area. I see common palms such as queens, dates, Pygmy’s ect. and would like to add something totally different to the landscaping that would do well here. I’ve had success in growing lots of tropicals such as coffee plants, Starfruit, mango, & sugar cane all outdoors year round. I live in Riverside (Inland California, Zone 9b). 

Thanks!

If I was starting a palm garden in your climate, and you plan to stay there for 10 or more years, I would invest in the species that are the slowest, but have been proven to thrive in your climate. Here is what I would buy as soon as possible:

Jubaea chilensis

Sabal 'Riverside'

Brahea (almost any species, short or tall)

Mules (many cocoid hybrids)

Copernicia (mainly South American)

Jubaeopsis caffra

Beccariophoenix alfredii

Bismarckia nobilis - buy small, you'll have a better survival rate

Ravenea xerophyla

Hi 98˚, Lo 66˚

 

 

 

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Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

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Here's a big list.

Full Sun

- Acrocomia aculeata

- Acrocomia crispa

- Acrocomia totai

- Acoelorrhaphe wrightii

- Attalea butyracea

- Attalea cohune

- Attalea guacuyule

- Beccariophoenix alfredii

- Bismarckia nobilis

- Brahea armata

- Brahea dulcis

- Brahea edulis

- Chrysalidocarpus decaryi

- Chrysalidocarpus decipiens

- Coccothrinax barbadensis

- Coccothrinax miraguama

- Copernicia macroglossa

- Livistona decora

- Medemia argun

- Phoenix reclinata

- Pseudophoenix sargentii

- Thrinax radiata

- Sabal bermudana

- Sabal causiarum

- Sabal dominguensis

- Sabal maritima

- Sabal mexicana

- Sabal minor

- Sabal palmetto

- Sabal uresana

- Serenoa repens

Partial Sun

- Arenga engleri

- Allagoptera arenaria

- Bactris mexicana

- Bactris setosa

- Caryota mitis

- Chamaedorea plumosa

- Chamaedorea seifrizii

- Chambeyronia macrocarpa

- Chrysalidocarpus onilahensis

- Roystonea regia

- Sabal mauritiiformis

- Sabal yapa

- Syagrus sancona

- Syagrus schizophylla

- Wodyetia bifurcata

Shade

- Chamaedorea brachypoda

- Chamaedorea cataractarum

- Chamaedorea costaricana

- Chamaedorea ernesti-augustii

- Chamaedorea metallica

- Chamaedorea microspadix

- Chamaedorea oblongata

- Chamaedorea pochutlensis

- Chamaedorea radicalis

- Reinhardtia gracilis

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49 minutes ago, idontknowhatnametuse said:

Here's a big list.

Full Sun

- Acrocomia aculeata

- Acrocomia crispa

- Acrocomia totai

- Acoelorrhaphe wrightii

- Attalea butyracea

- Attalea cohune

- Attalea guacuyule

- Beccariophoenix alfredii

- Bismarckia nobilis

- Brahea armata

- Brahea dulcis

- Brahea edulis

- Chrysalidocarpus decaryi

- Chrysalidocarpus decipiens

- Coccothrinax barbadensis

  Coccothrinax miraguama

- Copernicia macroglossa

- Livistona decora

- Medemia argun

- Phoenix reclinata

- Pseudophoenix sargentii

- Thrinax radiata

- Sabal bermudana

- Sabal causiarum

- Sabal dominguensis

- Sabal maritima

- Sabal mexicana

- Sabal minor

- Sabal palmetto

- Sabal uresana

- Serenoa repens

Partial Sun

- Arenga engleri

- Allagoptera arenaria

- Bactris mexicana

- Bactris setosa

- Caryota mitis

- Chamaedorea plumosa

- Chamaedorea seifrizii

- Chambeyronia macrocarpa

- Chrysalidocarpus onilahensis

- Roystonea regia

- Sabal mauritiiformis

- Sabal yapa

- Syagrus sancona

- Syagrus schizophylla

- Wodyetia bifurcata

Shade

- Chamaedorea brachypoda

- Chamaedorea cataractarum

- Chamaedorea costaricana

- Chamaedorea ernesti-augustii

- Chamaedorea metallica

- Chamaedorea microspadix

- Chamaedorea oblongata

- Chamaedorea pochutlensis

- Chamaedorea radicalis

-

 

Riverside is in USDA Hardiness Zone 9b

Attalea butyracea zone 10a

Attalea guacuyule zone 10b

Coccothrinax barbadensis zone 10b

Coccothrinax miraguama zone 10a

Medemia argun will die in most Mediterranean climates

Thrinax radiata zone 10a

Hi 98°, Lo 64°

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Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

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2 hours ago, Tom in Tucson said:

Riverside is in USDA Hardiness Zone 9b

Attalea butyracea zone 10a

Attalea guacuyule zone 10b

Coccothrinax barbadensis zone 10b

Coccothrinax miraguama zone 10a

Medemia argun will die in most Mediterranean climates

Thrinax radiata zone 10a

Hi 98°, Lo 64°

All of the above will grow out here 

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I'm not trying to be contentious, so I won't quibble about your claim except for one palm (I've grown for years) which I'm nearly 100% certain about: Medemia argun. There are a few conditions which this species must have to survive for 2 or more years: 

Nighttime lows below 60° will lead to the slow decline (and death) if the daytime highs aren't 85° while those low temps persist. The climates west of the Sonoran desert in SoCal are too cool. I'm not much of a betting man, but I know a sure thing when I see it, So I'm willing to wager that you can't show me rock solid proof of that species growing in the ground west of the desert for more than 2 years. Are you in on this wager?

Hi 102°, Lo 64°

Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

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Hey there neighbor! Welcome to Palmtalk and I'm located in Moreno Valley so I'm real close. I have a big list of palms for you.  You're welcome to stop by my garden and see some for yourself. 

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