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Some good looking Livistonas


DAVEinMB

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Good to see them used in landscaping - not just the usual suspects. They are beautiful and tough. I lost one of mine in the Garden Lot to Hurricane Ian but had 3 older ones near the house survive. I plan to plant 2 more 3g to help block the electrical substation early in 2023.

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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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5 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Good to see them used in landscaping - not just the usual suspects. They are beautiful and tough. I lost one of mine in the Garden Lot to Hurricane Ian but had 3 older ones near the house survive. I plan to plant 2 more 3g to help block the electrical substation early in 2023.

Yea they had them lining the street in front of the hotel I was staying at, I didn't count them but it was somewhere around 10 in total. So far the one I have planted in my garden has proven to be pretty tough and remarkably fast growing given the cold it's seen. Sorry to hear about the one you lost

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L decora are almost impossible to find here outside of a specialty nursery. I got 3 Livistonas & 1 Saribus from Premier Growers on Pine Island: 2 decora, 1 alfredii & a Saribus rotundifolia. We already planted the Saribus close to the stump of the African oil we lost near the house. Rotundifolia are less cold hardy than Livistonas. I suspect BB garden centers avoid Livistonas because of the teeth, although they sometimes load up on L chinensis, which is not a good choice for SWFL. They always look sickly and stunted - whether from the alkaline soil or our endless sweltering summers and wimpy winters, I don’t know. In NFL and TX they look great. Livistonas in general should be used more in landscaping.

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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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48 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

They always look sickly and stunted - whether from the alkaline soil or our endless sweltering summers and wimpy winters, I don’t know. In NFL and TX they look great. Livistonas in general should be used more in landscaping.

They look great on the equator in Singapore. I think they prefer richer/heavier soils vs sand. They look amazing in swamp New Orleans along with queens (another palm that isn't a fan of Florida sand). 

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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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22 hours ago, PalmatierMeg said:

L decora are almost impossible to find here outside of a specialty nursery. I got 3 Livistonas & 1 Saribus from Premier Growers on Pine Island: 2 decora, 1 alfredii & a Saribus rotundifolia. We already planted the Saribus close to the stump of the African oil we lost near the house. Rotundifolia are less cold hardy than Livistonas. I suspect BB garden centers avoid Livistonas because of the teeth, although they sometimes load up on L chinensis, which is not a good choice for SWFL. They always look sickly and stunted - whether from the alkaline soil or our endless sweltering summers and wimpy winters, I don’t know. In NFL and TX they look great. Livistonas in general should be used more in landscaping.

That's a shame because they sprout so profusely if you were to get seeds; and they grow pretty fast. I think I fell in love with the ones at Fairchild which is why I have them now. I guess I'd better start protecting my seeds from the squirrels. I can count 20 or 30 sprouts right now in my backyard area where my old seed producing decora used to be... The new one, well, I guess I'll have to get out the extension ladder.

20230101_110433.thumb.jpg.583bd1ea0b2e8d706ab53eb014e66433.jpg

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Oakley, California

55 Miles E-NE of San Francisco, CA

Solid zone 9, I can expect at least one night in the mid to low twenties every year.

Hot, dry summers. Cold, wet winters.

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