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Southern Hemisphere Growing Season 22/23


Tyrone
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Well I thought I’d start a new thread. I’m looking forward to a good growing season this year. Spring isn’t really here yet, but winter is slowly releasing its grip. By the equinox things start to really improve. Today is cloudy with rain returning tomorrow. A min of 12.5C this morning with a top of 18C forecast. The garden knows spring is upon us soon. The deciduous trees are in bud burst with the grapevines swelling there buds. My Rhopies, Howeas, and Archontophoenix are all opening spears in anticipation. Bring it on. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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There is a very old song "fool if you think it's over" , I thought winter was over, bananas growing again , palms looking great and pushing new growth then the coldest day of the year hits and possibly coldest September night in a few years tomorrow. (picking will see about -1.5C)  This was not in the models a couple days ago.  Still, better than having this hit in July or August, the house and ground must absorb some heat from the sun tomorrow to release at night. 

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41 minutes ago, cbmnz said:

There is a very old song "fool if you think it's over" , I thought winter was over, bananas growing again , palms looking great and pushing new growth then the coldest day of the year hits and possibly coldest September night in a few years tomorrow. (picking will see about -1.5C)  This was not in the models a couple days ago.  Still, better than having this hit in July or August, the house and ground must absorb some heat from the sun tomorrow to release at night. 

Damn. That’s some late frost. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Will know in the morning but looks like may have dodged the worse possible outcome, have had sunshine from dawn, and the frigid Southerly wind has died out about 3-4 hours earlier than forecast, early afternoon instead of at dusk. This has allowed the sun to warm things up a bit. Still have deployed full protection like would do in winter proper, hopefully this time the last. The grapevine has budded out with a few small leaves so that will be a good test case. Have never seen the grapevine buds damaged in the 20 years been here.

 

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Some clouds came over after about 2am, lucky they did as it had got down to 0.6C by then, which turned out to be the low. Hopefully now a clear run into spring.

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Yesterday morning we went down to 4.7C then the rain came back, so last night was considerably warmer. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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I’m looking forward to Sunday and Monday with 21C forecast for both days. Admittedly thunderstorms are forecast for both days but I will take it. It’s been gloomy, rainy and in the teens during the day. Some areas of lawn are not dry enough to mow yet. The mower would just go down and bog. 

Im hoping to start planting on the weekend. The weather is slowly warming up and the days lengthening. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Well yesterday was forecast 9-18C, and what we actually got was 4.7c -22.3C with deep blue skies for half the day with clouds moving in from noon on. Beautiful day really with dewpoints around 14C, so some spring humidity in the air. Warm enough to have a sundowner with wine and cheese after planting a couple of Ficus and Crinums in the afternoon. Then last night we had some short sharp bursts of rain, and this morning it’s blue skies again. The min was 6.8C with heavy fog after all the clouds cleared but it’s forecast to be 22C today. I reckon we may scrape 24C. I love spring. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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804BA47F-2E25-4A08-BB90-D15E14EBD8BD.jpeg

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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It got to a balmy 24.2C today. The warmest it’s been in ages. I planted another couple of Ficus, a Jubaeopsis and a Strelitzia nicolai. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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25.6C today. Loving it. Rain and storms are coming though. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Spring equinox today. 

Bring on Spring. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Had a cold clear morning with 1.2C min then a 20.8C max. Coldest I’ve seen so late in September. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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I was going to say that I thought your warm days down there might have been warmer than up here, Tyrone, but a quick look at the BOM stats proves me wrong...but it's been so overcast and miserable up here most days, it's seemed cold. High twenties soon - yay.

Your Chambeyronia looks happy - did you ever try them when you were up here?

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46 minutes ago, michael said:

I was going to say that I thought your warm days down there might have been warmer than up here, Tyrone, but a quick look at the BOM stats proves me wrong...but it's been so overcast and miserable up here most days, it's seemed cold. High twenties soon - yay.

Your Chambeyronia looks happy - did you ever try them when you were up here?

We’ve had some nice days, and some rubbish days too. I think we are 15C tomorrow. Last week it blew gale force westerlies constantly. 

Yes, I grew Chambeyronia up in Perth. They grew well. 

What part of Perth are you in? 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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I'm in Hammy Hill, near Clontarf Hill about 1km or so from the beach. I'm on that orangey limestoney sand, which makes getting some things established a bit difficult as soon as the rains stop. I put a few multi-trunked young bangalows in early last winter, and I think it was during that first run of 40+s that their emerging spears all fried. Then as the rest of the spear came out, the next round of hot weather came along and fried the whole plant....and I was watering them like mad...grrrr.  Most of my palms are in pots, usually because they're too young for full sun anyway (baby carpies, Kentiopsis, Veitchia etc). I know chambeyronias are hard to get hold of at the moment, but I wouldn't mind trying one one day.

I did put a coconut in in April...got it from Coast Road in February or something, and - of course, brought it home and  just dumped it out the front in the sun and managed to burn it badly before I dragged it into the shade. I put it in the ground between a concrete path and concrete black-painted terrace where it was fine till winter. It's been in a little cheap Bunnings green house all winter and the fronds that didn't burn are green and seem to be growing. I did pile up a heap of winter grass and other weeds around the base to generate a bit of heat - don't know if it made much difference but it looks no worse now than it did in Feb. Will take its house off it soon and see if it speeds up.

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The Perth heat can be brutal and this last summer was exceptional. I even recorded one 43.5C day in Feb that just torched things. Nowhere near the prolonged heat of Perth though. 

It sounds like you have a combination of what they call Spearwood sand with underlying limestone. The sand has a bit of iron in it which is good for greening things up but the limestone will make the pH high. Lots of compost, mulch, and sulfurous trace elements will be the go with that soil. On the positive side, you will have perfect drainage. For a coconut that is absolutely crucial. Being close to the ocean will mean winter minimums are never really cold but the wind speed will be high. A north facing sun trap out of the wind will be perfect for your coconut. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Been getting plenty of rain here, not many cold nights, all and all going to be a good growing season!IMG_20220328_123046.thumb.jpg.92249cbe99781f8193917c608e791099.jpg

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Port Macquarie NSW Australia

Warm temperate to subtropical

Record low of -2C at airport 2006

Pushing the limit of palm survivabilities

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Same latitude as us, but lush lush lush! What naughty palms (and other things) you shouldn't be growing are you trying in PM?

Tyrone - yeah, the sand is actually a touch sticky and nicely gritty when it's moist - a lot of things like it over winter and some go nuts. I have five compost bins going and always put as much in the hole when planting as I can. I got someone to do some limestone retaining walls out the back about 5 years ago, and an old roebelinii which ended up near one of the walls has been struggling for a while - because the sand's got too alkaline has been my best guess. Lots of sulfur etc, but it's still looking rough. Pity they're so difficult to transplant.

That's exactly where I put the coconut - the house is north-facing, so the palm is right in front of a black concrete terrace that runs along the front of the house. Maybe 4m to the west is the neighbour's fully established swayne's golden hedge  - it's a 20' wall which baffles a lot of the wind. We'll see how it goes - I don't think we had a night/morning below 6 this winter, so one can't complain. I do like coconuts but don't think they are absolutely the most beautiful palm, so if it karks it, I'll survive. Incidentally, I back-filled the hole with white sand I happened to have a pile of on a whim...

By the way, have you ever had a look at a forum called Growing on the Edge? I have been posting on it on and off for a few years, and it's interesting to see what people are getting away with in southern UK, the Pacific North-West etc. It's been fun watching (a select few of) the Brits experience their first 40 - apparently a 40 degree day a whole new climate zone doth make...some of them think central London is now 'more or less Mediterranean' because there are decent-sized CIDPs etc doing well amongst all the four-storey buildings and bitumen. I spose  if absolute minimum temps are your focus (and they do seem to matter to an important extent) then maybe...there are even baby kentias and archontophoenix in a few London parks apparently. But a July/August averaging out in the mid-20s once in 10000 years isn't exactly Sicily, or here. I get the impression from my chats with some of them over the past few years they think places like Perth are simply just like the south of the UK but with warmer temps and more sunshine - soft and English but nicer. One guy is obsessed with kangaroo paws - I've sent him manglesii seeds and other bits and pieces, which he just struggles to hatch for some reason. They were all arguing about which potting soil (as they call it) and what additives blah blah, and I interjected that here they grow in sand...the roo paw nut asked me, incredulously, "What about the nutrients??" So I asked him what those were - I think he was a bit too shocked to really compute.

 

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We have a very 'palmy' city in Darwin., but indeed it has its problems...specifically the prolonged dry season
Late September and the place is barren and bare only 2klm from the CBD in late September.
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47 minutes ago, greysrigging said:

We have a very 'palmy' city in Darwin., but indeed it has its problems...specifically the prolonged dry season
Late September and the place is barren and bare only 2klm from the CBD in late September.
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It’s dry alright. But I reckon this monsoon season will be a biggee this year.

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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That looks a bit like Port Macquarie during our drought a few years ago. Then of course the bushfires followed, flooding and for the most part, lots of rain showers. Everywhere along the east coast it looks beautiful and green.   

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Port Macquarie NSW Australia

Warm temperate to subtropical

Record low of -2C at airport 2006

Pushing the limit of palm survivabilities

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4 hours ago, greysrigging said:

October is our first 'wet season' month, and right on time, a big early morning storm 1st October
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I think your monsoon will be a good one this time round. Even down in the Pilbara they have been getting rainfall around 40-50mm which means early monsoon. 

This week we’ve been having nice spring weather with temps in the low to mid twenties. Tonight the rain is back with mid winter temps returning for a few days. By November spring will have fully put its foot on the ground. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Hopefully the last local snowfall of the year with the current southern blast here in Dunedin but you never know. 

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Been meaning to post about this blast- feeling a bit bad however about worrying about a possible late frost given what the people over in Florida have been facing.

Now have a 0C then a 1C overnight low predicted locally- that is an improvement over -2C and -2C that was forecast a few days ago. -2C has only happened locally in October once (in the 1930s) in records back to 1908 so I did think it was a bold prediction coming off a mild winter.

Just a case of if need to apply full winter style protection (which was all packed away) or trust it's October so it can't be that bad. At least any minor damage at this time of year (to bananas etc) will grow out fast.

It's the Kiwifruit and Blueberry growers that will have been stressing all this week.

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2 minutes ago, cbmnz said:

Been meaning to post about this blast- feeling a bit bad however about worrying about a possible late frost given what the people over in Florida have been facing.

Now have a 0C then a 1C overnight low predicted locally- that is an improvement over -2C and -2C that was forecast a few days ago. -2C has only happened locally in October once (in the 1930s) in records back to 1908 so I did think it was a bold prediction coming off a mild winter.

Just a case of if need to apply full winter style protection (which was all packed away) or trust it's October so it can't be that bad. At least any minor damage at this time of year (to bananas etc) will grow out fast.

It's the Kiwifruit and Blueberry growers that will have been stressing all this week.

That is real cold this late in spring. I bet cherries grow nice there. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Was 0.9deg this morning at 615am. The rhopies didnt seem to mind a bit of snow but will assess for damage later. First October snowfall in years.

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I'd freak if that happened here. To QLD I would go. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

I'd freak if that happened here. To QLD I would go. 

I think I'd do the same if we got snow like that in our equivalent month of April.

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April snow including to decent depths is not that uncommon in the UK is it not?

The polar origin of this airmass is a once in a decade or less occurrence, my forecast low has bounced down to -2C again, which has not happened in this month since 1935!

Somehow I think coming of a mild winter and it only started to get cold yesterday afternoon it's hard to see it reaching a temp last seen 88 years ago when winters were much colder. There must be a bit of heat stored in the ground.

Did get 6-7 hours of sun today and scratched up  to a high of 13.

Just glad I don't have $400K of crop under threat tonight like some will. 

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2 hours ago, cbmnz said:

April snow including to decent depths is not that uncommon in the UK is it not?

The polar origin of this airmass is a once in a decade or less occurrence, my forecast low has bounced down to -2C again, which has not happened in this month since 1935!

Somehow I think coming of a mild winter and it only started to get cold yesterday afternoon it's hard to see it reaching a temp last seen 88 years ago when winters were much colder. There must be a bit of heat stored in the ground.

Did get 6-7 hours of sun today and scratched up  to a high of 13.

Just glad I don't have $400K of crop under threat tonight like some will. 

Wow -2C forecast in October. I hope it’s wrong and above zero. 

Your day though sounded much the same as mine. Cold, wet, southerly gusty winds and 14C max. Almost no sun though.

Here are my Parajubaeas taken before sundown today. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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2 hours ago, cbmnz said:

April snow including to decent depths is not that uncommon in the UK is it not?

The polar origin of this airmass is a once in a decade or less occurrence, my forecast low has bounced down to -2C again, which has not happened in this month since 1935!

Somehow I think coming of a mild winter and it only started to get cold yesterday afternoon it's hard to see it reaching a temp last seen 88 years ago when winters were much colder. There must be a bit of heat stored in the ground.

Did get 6-7 hours of sun today and scratched up  to a high of 13.

Just glad I don't have $400K of crop under threat tonight like some will. 

April snow to decent depths would be extreme even in northern Scotland. Every decade or so we may get a dusting of snow in April down here, but nothing heavy at all. Like literally a few mm every 5-10 years in April. Most of London would be too warm for April snow as any amount of snow in general is pretty rare in London nowadays. I think the last proper snowfall was in Feb 2018, which was just under a foot of snow for me here. Less in London. There was no snow last winter, or in 3 of the previous 4 winters in London and SE England.

When it gets really cold it is usually pretty dry due to clear skies, especially at night. So it’s either cold and dry, or mild and wet during winter. It’s rare for it to be both cold and snowing here due to the high pressure precipitation block needed to push in cold air masses from the Arctic. Snow is probably 10 x less likely in London now compared to say 30-40 years ago. Mostly due to climate change, but also the ever-expanding UHI. Interestingly the latest long-term forecast models point towards a serious freeze in northwest Europe during early winter, but still dry with minimal snow. Thats too far away to predict accurately though.

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Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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I read that this event caused the first October snow recorded in Christchurch for 53 years.

Not exactly ideal palm growing weather...but shortlived. Back to the typical spring weather today and this weekend. 

All part of the fun living far away from any continental landmass. Seasons can mean little here sometimes.

 

 

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9 hours ago, cbmnz said:

April snow including to decent depths is not that uncommon in the UK is it not?

The polar origin of this airmass is a once in a decade or less occurrence, my forecast low has bounced down to -2C again, which has not happened in this month since 1935!

Somehow I think coming of a mild winter and it only started to get cold yesterday afternoon it's hard to see it reaching a temp last seen 88 years ago when winters were much colder. There must be a bit of heat stored in the ground.

Did get 6-7 hours of sun today and scratched up  to a high of 13.

Just glad I don't have $400K of crop under threat tonight like some will. 

It depends where in the UK, even snow in Dec, Jan and February is very rare here in London as you get into march and April there is practically no chance of snow unless some record breaking weather is going to occur in the future which I doubt since winters are milder.  Last winter was a 10a. Either way if the nikau palms and archontophoenix and queens in Christchurch can survive the snow  that's good news for the long term viability of them here.

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Darn, the forecasters are good. Constant helicopters from 4am was not what I was wanting to hear.  But so far so seems my garden has escaped any serious damage.  Low was-1.1C on my station  which smashes any previous record for October, never gone below 0 before.  Thr leaves on banans looked good and nothing had mottled up. Will see over the next few days. Two nearby airports hit -3C which has gone under and possibly  smashed their all time Oct records, will confirm. Nature can still throw a curveball when you least expect.

 

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1 hour ago, cbmnz said:

Darn, the forecasters are good. Constant helicopters from 4am was not what I was wanting to hear.  But so far so seems my garden has escaped any serious damage.  Low was-1.1C on my station  which smashes any previous record for October, never gone below 0 before.  Thr leaves on banans looked good and nothing had mottled up. Will see over the next few days. Two nearby airports hit -3C which has gone under and possibly  smashed their all time Oct records, will confirm. Nature can still throw a curveball when you least expect.

 

Hopefully all you're palms and plants are fine that's definitely cold for 37n. That's colder than anything here this year, my bananas still had their leaves after the light freeze I had last winter so hopefully none of you're plants had much damage. Are the freezes in new Zealand because of wind coming from Antarctica? 

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30 minutes ago, Foxpalms said:

Hopefully all you're palms and plants are fine that's definitely cold for 37n. That's colder than anything here this year, my bananas still had their leaves after the light freeze I had last winter so hopefully none of you're plants had much damage. Are the freezes in new Zealand because of wind coming from Antarctica? 

Yeah, this one was. The backward trajectory of this event showed air right from the polar plateau spilled North as far as 30S. For context last night's official low at -3C was 11C below average. I hope I never see a night 11C below average in a mid winter month in my lifetime as that would mean -7C in July.

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Hey Foxpalms,  If you are interested there was an article in the local paper which explains the origins/cause of this particular anomaly event. Generally our freezes are associated with bad/cold weather frrom the south, followed by a big high pressure system and clear skies. Tried to post the link to it but failed - so here is a text grab:

An anomaly observed in the Indian Ocean led to the polar jet stream – that's a band of fast-flowing, narrow air currents circulating high in the atmosphere – being pushed further south, toward Antarctica

"It's taken a very loopy pathway, all the way toward the South Pole, and then directly up into New Zealand," he said.

"In order for this to happen, you have to have a very, very large area of high pressure south of Australia – or what we call anticyclonic wave-breaking – which basically forces the jet stream to move around.

"In this case, it had to travel right down to the ice sheets just to manoeuvre its way around this massive high, before finding its way back up to New Zealand – so it's quite a sequence."

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Sounds similar to here we have bad freezes when there's an anomaly in the polar jet stream and it sends very cold air from the north pole/Scandinavia here. For widespread snow, moist air would have to come up from the south and mix with the dry air coming from the arctic. Luckily that's very rare. @Phil PetersenWhat was the lowest temperature you saw this winter? Are the Rhopalostylis sapida all fine it will be interesting how they cope with snow. @cbmnz Did the forecast say -3c and you ended up at -1c.  I don't think the BBC or metoffice ever factor in the urban heat island here.  happened last winter lots (forecast was lower than the temperature got too) the conditions were the same as the forecast said, clear skies low wind , but it never went below freezing except 1 night. For example now we have clear skies and no wind, forecast shows 55f for now but the temperature is 57f now and it's always more inaccurate on nights below freezing.

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