Jump to content

Back from the dead


Fusca

Recommended Posts

Finally got some new growth on two of my transplanted palms!  Mule was dug up from my yard in San Antonio in late February and kept in a pot 3 weeks before planting in March.  It spear-pulled within 2 weeks and I treated with some hydrogen peroxide and copper fungicide.  It's been sitting there for the past two months with 3 brown fronds and one green petiole.

IMG_20220819_151845.jpg

  • Like 12

Jon Sunder

Link to comment
Share on other sites

nice!

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/@tntropics - 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size, 3 dwarf),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), etonia (1) louisiana(5), palmetto (1), riverside (1),  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows -1F, 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My blue Copernicia alba was transplanted in April.  It retained several fronds for a couple of months and they slowly died off leaving 2 that still had some green.  It didn't spear-pull but it had multiple spears growing at the time it was dug that quickly turned brown that I cut back.  After having to look at ugly for so long it'll finally be worth it once it's replaced it's crown.

IMG_20220819_151918.jpg

Edited by Fusca
  • Like 9
  • Upvote 1

Jon Sunder

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a Palmetto that lost its entire center to the cold snap here  in 2018 . It was a small palm that was just about to start trunking , so when I pulled out the center there was just  a big hole left there . I thought it was a goner but when I checked it later in the summer  I saw new growth coming out of the hole and now it's a small trunking palm . 

It's always nice to see that first bit of new growth . Hopefully one of those fronds can mature enough to start some photosynthesis going before winter . 

Will

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Will Simpson said:

I had a Palmetto that lost its entire center to the cold snap here  in 2018 . It was a small palm that was just about to start trunking , so when I pulled out the center there was just  a big hole left there . I thought it was a goner but when I checked it later in the summer  I saw new growth coming out of the hole and now it's a small trunking palm . 

It's always nice to see that first bit of new growth . Hopefully one of those fronds can mature enough to start some photosynthesis going before winter . 

Will

I've had palms spear-pull due to cold before but never due to transplanting.  Severe transplant shock.  Same thing happened to a Chamaerops 'argentea' but only to the main stem.  There's plenty of time before the next freeze - last year's low was 30°.  The mule and Copernicia were my two fastest palms last season.

3 hours ago, Allen said:

nice!

Thanks - hoping for a full recovery!

  • Upvote 1

Jon Sunder

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wtg Jon! Really cool they survived :greenthumb:

Here's to a mild winter.

  • Upvote 1

Hesperia,Southern CA (High Desert area). Zone 8b

Elevation; about 3600 ft.

Lowest temp. I can expect each year 19/20*f lowest since I've been growing palms *13(2007) Hottest temp. Each year *106

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/19/2022 at 6:16 PM, Fusca said:

My blue Copernicia alba was transplanted in April.  It retained several fronds for a couple of months and they slowly died off leaving 2 that still had some green.  It didn't spear-pull but it had multiple spears growing at the time it was dug that quickly turned brown that I cut back.  After having to look at ugly for so long it'll finally be worth it once it's replaced it's crown.

That's good to hear!  I was under the impression that most Copernicia died if transplanted, like Bismarckia.  It's nice to know that it is possible, even if it's really mad at you right now!  :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, Merlyn said:

That's good to hear!  I was under the impression that most Copernicia died if transplanted, like Bismarckia.  It's nice to know that it is possible, even if it's really mad at you right now!  :D

That's definitely true about the Caribbean Copernicia but from what I had read the South American (alba and prunifera) are easier to move.  Maybe not as easy as I would have liked!  

  • Like 1

Jon Sunder

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just noticed another candidate!  Not a transplant but a large Hyphaene theabica seedling that I thought might not survive after suffering root damage during planting.  Sure enough it appeared to have dried up and died but it still has life!  No sign of green previously.

IMG_20220822_200736.jpg

  • Like 2

Jon Sunder

Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, OC2Texaspalmlvr said:

Nice comebacks Jon !!! What other goodies you got in the ground there ? 

T J 

Thanks TJ!  I've got a 7' Roystonia regia, a triple Archontophoenix cunninghamiana (5-gal), Livistona nitida (that you saw shortly after I bought it from Joseph that's about 6' tall now), 3-gal Sabal 'lisa', 5-gal Copernicia prunifera, 5-gal Brahea 'super silver', 7-gal Syagrus romanzoffiana, 3-gal Carpentaria and a large Butia odorata (10' tall). Smaller palms are Dypsis pembana, Gaussia gomez-pompae, Normanbya normanbyi, Medemia argun, Hyphaene petersiana, Livistona mariae x decora and 4 Bismarckia (2 are 15-gal and 2 seedlings).  Also have several small Sabals (uresana, maritima, domingensis, Riverside and Louisiana).  I've got many seedlings that are almost ready to go in the ground but still too small.

  • Like 2

Jon Sunder

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...