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Growing Cocos nucifera (Coconut) in marginal climates outside the tropical monsoon, in subtropical, Mediterranean type climate, methods used


Maltese coconut project

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This discussion is regarding growing Cocos nucifera (Coconut) outside the bracket between the tropic of cancer and the tropic of capricorn where climate is less ideal. Everyone is invited to share their data, experiences, methods, techniques used and results. The aim of this topic is to learn from and hopefully help each other by sharing the knowledge 

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On 7/26/2021 at 9:23 PM, Aleitalyyy said:

my coconut, banana, baby pineapple, alfredii, lemon etc are facing south / east they only sunbathe in the morning ... my temperatures according to the zones are good ... minimum 3/6 ° max 13/15 ° degrees ... my location is northern Italy on the Ligurian coast in the city of alassio

 

On 7/27/2021 at 6:20 PM, Aleitalyyy said:

yes .. I think that in my part of the country the cold is too low for a coconut ... and even the maximums are low .... citrus fruits, bananas, pineapples, avocados grow well ... but coconut I think only in a greenhouse, or one genetically reinforced by some substance ... surely an adult and large plant sheltered in a perfect place in full sun, and with a greenhouse that can be mountable for the winter it could do it even from my latitudes ...

 

On 7/29/2021 at 5:30 AM, GottmitAlex said:

Very nice! Are their husks buried?

 

16 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

They're doing just fine.

Sneak peak: 

(This golden Malayan turns 5years old the 29th of August)

 

 

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On 5/26/2021 at 3:02 AM, JohnAndSancho said:

How long have you had it @Reyes Vargas?

 

10 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

You have to add SALT.   That is key.

 

9 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

It's not an opinion. It is a fact.

https://businessmirror.com.ph/2014/11/03/pca-urges-farmers-to-use-salt-as-coconut-fertilizer/

https://businessdiary.com.ph/3512/use-of-salt-as-fertilizer-for-coconut/

https://ep.franphil.com/salt-an-effective-and-cheap-fertilizer-for-coconut/

 

I can go on and on.  Between the Philippines and India, they employ the same methods. There are several papers out regarding NaCl. (Salt) for coconuts.  

Yes, the downside is, wherever you place the salt, the land(soil) will be inert. So you won't be able to grow anything else except Coconuts.  You will kill any other palms (and any plant) with salt in the soil.

Coconuts love salt.

 

https://pca.gov.ph/pdf/cocoTech/fertilization/commonSaltFetilizationOnCocounuts.pdf

 

9 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

You tell me....

Non so esattamente

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9 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

That the risk you will take.  Hence, my recommendation to obtain a Beccariophoenix alfredii instead of Cocos nucifera.

 

9 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

 

33 minutes ago, PALM MOD said:

You are welcome to start any topic you wish as long as it is about palms and posted in the appropriate forum. If it is worthwhile, people will participate. We have had many topics throughout the years regarding the growing of coconuts outside of the tropics. So, whether your topic offers anything new will remain to be seen. But no need to ask permission.

If you mean starting a new forum just for coconuts in various climates, then no - that is not a broad enough topic of interest to warrant a dedicated forum.

 

27 minutes ago, PALM MOD said:

Yes - any topic about palms in the "Discussing Palms" forum is allowed.

Thanks kindly.. I just opened the new discussion.. Please everyone is invited to share their experiences. We're here to learn from and help each other.. Here's the link for the new discussion 

 

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4 hours ago, Maltese coconut project said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks kindly.. I just opened the new discussion.. Please everyone is invited to share their experiences. We're here to learn from and help each other.. Here's the link for the new discussion 

 

I'm here is Florida north of Tropic of Cancer.  This coconut is 16 years old.  Coldest temperature last winter 37 degrees Fahrenheit .

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Wow this is very interesting. How long do cold spells last in that area? Which area of Florida? 

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8 hours ago, Maltese coconut project said:

Wow this is very interesting. How long do cold spells last in that area? Which area of Florida? 

Seminole, Florida  is located at 27°50′19″N 82°47′6″W (27.838502, -82.784913).  It is surrounded by Pinellas County enclaves in all directions. Its closest neighbors are Indian Rocks Beach to the northwest, Largo to the north, Pinellas Park to the east, St. Petersburg to the south, and Madeira Beach to the west.

Seminole has a humid subtropical climate.  We are  far enough south that it lies in the broad transition zone from subtropical to tropical climates. As such, Seminole is mostly warm to hot year round, with few nights of frost. Most of the annual rainfall comes in the wet season (June through September), when daily thundershowers erupt due to the strong solar heating. The dry season starts in October and runs through May, at which time the weather is sunny, dry, and there is little change in daily weather.  Historical average for rainfall in August is 8 inches.  

Last winter we had no frost.  If we do get nights in the low 40's or high 30's it only last a few hours.  As soon as the sun rises in the morning the temperature usually rebound quickly.  I used to wrap the tree when it was a juvenile during cold nights.  Not anymore.  I haven't done a thing since we have had mild winters last few seasons.  

Last month we had Hurricane Elsa.  We had 50-60 MPH winds.  Coconut had no wind damage except for a few coconuts falling to the ground.  

I bought the  sprouted coconut tree from a small road side produce stand in Maui for $5.00.  I got it inspected at the airport and was able to put it in my carry on luggage.  I never potted it and stuck it in the ground the next day when I arrived home  in Florida.  After 16 years it is still going strong.  

Good luck with your coconut project.  

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Great information that you shared here.. Very beautiful tree you have there, keep it up.. This is the information I need.. In the country I live in (Malta) we're 35.9 degrees N. We're also subtropical but going further down become North Africa and the Sahara desert.. We're mostly humid due to being a small archipelago of Islands but rainfall is low.. Obviously I have to water most of the time.. Our average rainfall was originally 570mm (22.4 inches) per year but these last years it has gone down to around 400 mm (16 inches) per year. Yes we're an arid country 

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No new pictures yet, but here is my Cocos in the Netherlands. It has some sunburn on the older leaves, but that is o.k.
It is pushing new leaves Alain and again.

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Edited by MelvinB
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Wow that's really up north now.  From which season does it hit 10 degrees celcius there and need to bring inside? 

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I understand.. That's good keeping it safe.. My oldest ones survived our Maltese winter with night time low occasionally reaching 9 degrees celcius but in South facing position and daytime sun temperatures go back to 20 degrees celcius 

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  • 2 weeks later...

When are you going to plant them?

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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Probably summer 2022 when the construction site behind our house is ready 

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@Aleitalyyy you asked on another thread (subforum) about the cold hardiness between green and golden(yellow) coconuts.

I answered that green coconuts are are hardier (more cold resistant) than Golden/yellow coconuts.

First picture is my golden (yellow). 

Second picture is one of my green coconut palms.

 

 

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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In your climate at this time of the year it's probably not the cold the problem but rather the low humidity 

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One more thing,  can you compare both of the varieties newest leaves? 

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@GottmitAlex 

hi alex I have followed many many posts here on the forum ... the idea was born from all the posts with coconut on the edge ... corona, new port beach, then those in the desert etc etc are all yellow ... I was convinced then that the yellows were more tolerant of the winter cold ... it will be just coincidences then ..

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6 hours ago, Aleitalyyy said:

@GottmitAlex 

hi alex I have followed many many posts here on the forum ... the idea was born from all the posts with coconut on the edge ... corona, new port beach, then those in the desert etc etc are all yellow ... I was convinced then that the yellows were more tolerant of the winter cold ... it will be just coincidences then ..

It was a coincidence. My first coconut I bought through eBay and it was a golden.   Like I've mentioned before: it was an accident. I thought coconuts could grow in my region. :floor:

During transit time, I learned a lot of things about coconuts.  I even changed out the soil/medium from "native" dirt to 100% pure coarse (thick) sand. Among other things.

And it's growing nicely.

 

 

 

 

 

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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17 hours ago, Maltese coconut project said:

Size comparison with me 

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Since you are in Europe, I recommend this product as a foliar application. 

Made in Deutschland.

 

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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SALT!

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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Not many folks believe me. However, salt works!  Yes, the soil/medium will be inert to grow anything other than coconuts. But it's a worthwhile risk.  Salt kills anything except cocos. Cocos love it.

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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According to Purdue University agricultural website, salt is not a necessity for coconut palm since they are facultative halophytes,, but on the other hand, Philippines website pca.gov.ph say that it improves yield. But then if one uses slow release fertiliser twice a year and regular water soluble fertiliser during the warm growing season (I use an only 1/5 dilute NPK 22 12 12 together with micronutrients containing Boron, Magnesium,, Manganese, Iron, Copper, Zinc and Molybdenum with traces of other elements so as to improve their health without ruining soil. One can use tap water for traces of Chloride) . In this table shows the essential and beneficial elements 

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Edited by Maltese coconut project
Forgot to mention an important detail
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  • 2 weeks later...

When a golden coco meets a green coco.

 

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Update before moving them south facing for cooler months till 20th May 2022 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Coconut palms and other plants enjoying their South facing position with temperature variations between 24-35 (75-95 degrees Fahrenheit)degrees celcius depending on sunny vs cloudy moments. 

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I don't know whether this specific gravity meter is correct or far from accurate but if it is near than I must say I am astounded by the amount of salinity present in our Maltese tap water. No wonder the coconuts are happy. Supposed pure freshwater is just 0 ppt or 1.00 specific gravity 

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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So I decided to get a more accurate device (refractometer) instead of the other one and the result is that actually the tap water is only 1 part per thousand (0.1%) salinity, much less than with the other device which I had the impression of being ( around 8 part per thousand or 0.8%) 

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Edited by Maltese coconut project
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5 hours ago, Maltese coconut project said:

So I decided to get a more accurate device (refractometer) instead of the other one and the result is that actually the tap water is only 1 part per thousand (0.1%) salinity, much less than with the other device which I had the impression of being ( around 8 part per thousand or 0.8%) 

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You may want to add a little bit of salt to your coco.

 

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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I still find some articles a bit confusing when it comes to adding salt.  According to this particular article they don't recommend watering with above 0.6% salinity, or 6 parts per thousand. Sometimes I still doubt this number but then on second thought, I also know that they are monsoon plants and I still fear taking the risk. To be honest I wish to experiment trying a few near a local beach, but our low precipitation discourages me. To solve the problem I need to find an all year round watercourse https://www.ehow.com/facts_7623427_can-coconut-trees-sea-water.html

Edited by Maltese coconut project
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