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Growing Brahea armata in a damp climate


Ryland
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8 hours ago, sonoranfans said:

Kudos to all that have kept these alive in humid places.  In the arizona desert with irrigation, mine(6 of them various sizes 4' to 14' overall) had 20-30 blue leaves.  In part shade they lose some blue to a greenish blue.  They like water in the heat, but yes they like heat and lots of sun to grow.  A plant with a waxy leaf reflects a good part of the sunlight limiting photosynthesis, so the plant will shed some wax to make up for it (a little) but armata has its limits there.  I like the idea of covering the roots with plastic tarp in the rainy/cool seasons.  Best of luck with growing those in a humid climate.  My armata that I brought from arizona was alive for almost 3 years ina container here before I decided to put it out of its mysery.  I also had a clara that was in the ground for 7 years, 8' tall overall.  But after hurrican IRMA devastated it, it was shocked and just sat there with mold rapidly spreading in what was left of the crown.  I edited it, giving in to mother nature.    For me, the best way to go blue (like armata) is copernicia hospita.  If I were in england I would not doubt try a clara with max sun and a cover over the roots in the cool/wet season.  The problem with clara(unlike armata) is they are often green, so look for a seedling showing blue if possible.

I am amazed you kept brahea armata alive in Florida, I heard from many FL growers that armata hates the wet Florida Summers. Seems they don't mind the rain here because it's so cool. Florida is ideal for Copernicia, I grow hospita and several other Copernicia and they are very slow for me but still look nice. The hospita requires a lot of fertilizer to stay blue.

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There aren’t a ton of Brahea here in Corpus but the ones that are here look pretty good, humidity is through the roof and temps are high for the majority of the year, perhaps the saving grace is that it doesn’t rain as much as Florida, they get to dry out between storms, or this year there are hardly any storms at all, they just get to be dry. 
 

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Corpus Christi, TX, near salt water, zone 9b/10a! Except when it isn't and everything gets nuked back to the stone age of zone 8.

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10 minutes ago, Xerarch said:

There aren’t a ton of Brahea here in Corpus but the ones that are here look pretty good, humidity is through the roof and temps are high for the majority of the year, perhaps the saving grace is that it doesn’t rain as much as Florida, they get to dry out between storms, or this year there are hardly any storms at all, they just get to be dry. 
 

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I can think of three in Galveston, one at the end of Broadway and the beach and there were two at Moody Gardens. Not sure if they still exist today. But one thing is certain is there is more wind than inland that prevents dew on leaves, and even heard that salty air on the Island helps against fungus. But these do not compare to what I see in California. The ones at Peckerwood Gardens always had a ton of blackened fungus on their lower leaves.

But Corpus is pretty dry, but its humid for sure. But up here there is just no wind and wind sure helps in the summer evening. I just get drenched in sweat. 

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30 Year Zone Average 20F. Ryan: Contact 979.204.4161 Collectorpalms@gmail.com

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On ‎6‎/‎23‎/‎2022 at 11:48 PM, Collectorpalms said:

I can think of three in Galveston, one at the end of Broadway and the beach and there were two at Moody Gardens. Not sure if they still exist today. But one thing is certain is there is more wind than inland that prevents dew on leaves, and even heard that salty air on the Island helps against fungus. But these do not compare to what I see in California. The ones at Peckerwood Gardens always had a ton of blackened fungus on their lower leaves.

But Corpus is pretty dry, but its humid for sure. But up here there is just no wind and wind sure helps in the summer evening. I just get drenched in sweat. 

I saw 2 Brahea armatas at the Mobil Station at Broadway and University Rear Bv. in Galveston on Google Street View, but they are not the ones on the pictures. Please tell what street the pictured palms are on so I can see them on Street View.

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8 hours ago, howfam said:

I saw 2 Brahea armatas at the Mobil Station at Broadway and University Rear Bv. in Galveston on Google Street View, but they are not the ones on the pictures. Please tell what street the pictured palms are on so I can see them on Street View.

I didn't post pictures. but yes there are two at the end of Broadway at the Mobil. It appears as if the one on the right is in decline. Before the freeze it was heathy and had seeds. But clearly if you look at the dates on google maps it went into decline after the freeze.

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.3052316,-94.7727613,3a,37.5y,332.97h,90.14t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sc9IAnUCPnLqPqK47byANAw!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

Edited by Collectorpalms

30 Year Zone Average 20F. Ryan: Contact 979.204.4161 Collectorpalms@gmail.com

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PHX has beautiful Braheas, as well as the best robustas in the US.

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  • 5 weeks later...

I am growing Brahea armata (from seed and now in the ground) in the Azores at an elevation of 150 meters ASL and it is growing slowly. The one still in the pot has received stunted growth this year with tiny new fronds.

Average day temperatures: +17°C in the winter and +24°C in the summer. Typical Summer: 66F to 77F (19C to 25C). Typical Winter: 50F to 64F (10C to 18C). Record Low (past 5 years): 45F or +7.7C (once a winter, some winters). Record High (past 5 years): 80F or +27C (some days only). Elevation 140 m (459 ft.), latitude 38.54º. Sunset Zone: unknown

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