Jump to content

Texas Tough Plants Nursery & Mail Order.


Collectorpalms

Recommended Posts

Howdy, I had a plant nursery in Texas for a decade until 2010, called CollectorPalms. 

I have considered restarting with “Texas Tough Plants” ; lots of native plants and ones that do well here and similar places. Right now it’s still a dream, but I have the availability to get it up and running in a year. I have experience growing & shipping small to large palms. Others, I may need some input.


Why, I think it’s needed, it’s difficult to get certain plants. 10-20 years ago had a lot of good nurseries that are no longer... they retired mostly. Also the recession of 2008 hurt a lot of nurseries. I also have no local competition. No other cool Nurseries. 
 

Question to all.
 

What would you like to see available at the nursery? Specific palms, agaves, yuccas, cactus, trees etc... sizes & prices?

Thanks for the ideas. I have a list already in mind, but want good feedback from others. 

Everyone reading this, give me your thoughts! Please! Thanks in Advance!

Edited by Collectorpalms
  • Like 11
  • Upvote 1

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

Howdy, I had a plant nursery in Texas for a decade until 2010, called CollectorPalms. 

I have considered restarting with “Texas Tough Plants” ; lots of native plants and ones that do well here and similar places. Right now it’s still a dream, but I have the availability to get it up and running in a year. I have experience shipping small to large palms.


Why, I think it’s needed, it’s difficult to get certain plants. 10-20 years ago had a lot of good nurseries that are no longer... they retired mostly. Also the recession of 2008 hurt a lot of nurseries.
 

Question to all.
 

What would you like to see available at the nursery? Specific palms, agaves, yuccas, cactus, trees etc... sizes & prices?

Thanks for the ideas. I have a list already in mind, but want good feedback from others. 

This is so cool, Ryan. Texas really needs this.

One thing that I think everyone would appreciate would be some rarer Trachycarpus species, like T. takil, martianus, princeps, etc. Now I know those are rare, but they could be started by seed if all else fails when trying to find them.

Braheas are a good choice. Clara, decumbens, armata.

Washingtonia filifera will be a mainstay for sure.

Maybe some Parajubaeas, Butia×jub, mules, that kind of thing.

Sabals of all kinds - palmetto, mexicana, louisiana, 'lisa', minor, uresana

Needles would be great (especially for those in Northwest TX!)

Loquats, pineapple guava, Palo verde, Pawpaws, that kind of stuff.

Argentine saguaro and giant saguaro would be amazing.

I don't know much about prices.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Teegurr
  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hope you pull it off...I know I bought several palms from you in the past

and was disappointed when I checked my saved sellers(E-Bay)only to see you and so many others

are gone...it used to be you could get a S.Louisiana S.McCurtain S.Brazoria etc

very easily and cheaply too...at least compared to todays prices.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd definitely be a regular if you started up again.  I'd vote for:

Interesting Chamaerops (Dicks Mutant, Cerifera, etc)

Chammys (Radicalis, Costarricana I think I read is pretty tough, etc)

Guihaia argyrata

Correctly identified Phoenix hybrids

Sabals including Lisa's for sure

Nobody sells needles or minors at any of the nusries that I frequent in the Houston area

Serenoa Repens

Arenga Englerii

C. Alba? B. Alfredii? For us z9 pushers!

Get to work!

 

 

Edited by Keys6505
  • Like 6
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, Keys6505 said:

Nobody sells needles or minors at any of the nusries that I frequent in the Houston area

I saw Sabal Minors at a nursery in the Houston area. Enchanted Gardens had them, I saw them last week at the 6420 FM 359 in Richmond. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

Howdy, I had a plant nursery in Texas for a decade until 2010, called CollectorPalms. 

I have considered restarting with “Texas Tough Plants” ; lots of native plants and ones that do well here and similar places. Right now it’s still a dream, but I have the availability to get it up and running in a year. I have experience growing & shipping small to large palms. Others, I may need some input.


Why, I think it’s needed, it’s difficult to get certain plants. 10-20 years ago had a lot of good nurseries that are no longer... they retired mostly. Also the recession of 2008 hurt a lot of nurseries. I also have no local competition. No other cool Nurseries. 
 

Question to all.
 

What would you like to see available at the nursery? Specific palms, agaves, yuccas, cactus, trees etc... sizes & prices?

Thanks for the ideas. I have a list already in mind, but want good feedback from others. 

Everyone reading this, give me your thoughts! Please! Thanks in Advance!

Ryan, first thing for me is the price. :) I am not going to pay $1.2k (planted with a one year warrantee) for example for a Robusta the same size as the bigger one that I had that grew like that in less than two years from a $29.99 Houston Garden Center Palm which I also got at a 50% sale price. :)  Lots of the nurseries in the area that I look around have forgotten what common sense is. There are some of them where I won't enter again in a million years because they are rip offs. 

Now to come to the second things, right now I got crazy with Sabals (Mexicana), so I would have gotten 10-15 directly (5-10 gallons sizes) if any nursery had any in my area. Next ones that I got crazy with and again I would have gotten a few were the Filifera because I don't want to end up in a few years to have to cut my big Robusta. :) 

But that is just me and  my two cents.

Edited by CiprianS
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd add Nannorhops ritchiana (green and silver forms), Bismarckia nobilis (green and silver forms),  and Hyphaene coriacea to the suggestions above.  Perhaps Medemia argun and Jubaea chilensis if you can get them to grow there.  Phoenix theophrasti as well?

  • Like 4

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone (2012): 9b | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (1985, 1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a | 30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would personally love to see availability of all of these at a nursery, as would many people on this forum.  The question is are there enough locals that would care to buy Sabal minor, Guihaia, Nannorhops, Rhapiophyllum, etc.  I think most people find those boring and they are a hard sell to the general populous.   So you try and sell something more exciting like Bismarckia, well I think those should be sold and planted far more in south Texas, but they got smoked big time this freeze even in south Texas, so that starts to not fit the theme very well for adapted plants.

People are excited by large, trunking palms that grow fast and won't die. If W filifera is not easy to find, it ought to get easy to find, that should be a winner for much of Texas, also the various hybrids of Syagrus, Butia, Jubaea should be of a lot of interest, and which of the Dick Douglas hybrids might be of commercial potential? Also I like the idea of various Brahea and Livistona although the growth rate could be quite restrictive for those, people want big stuff fast and cheap.  I also like the idea of Phoenix hybrids or special cultivars.  Man someone posted a pic of that blue Phoenix theophrasti at Kopsick on another thread, it's stunning, if someone could grow a whole field of ones that look just like that you'd really be in business.

  • Like 3

Corpus Christi, TX, near salt water, zone 9b/10a! Except when it isn't and everything gets nuked.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cold hardy, cold hardy, cold hardy! 
I grow alot of small palms because most tropical plants such as elephant ears, split leaf philodendron need too much water and look horrible in winter. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our local nurseries seem to mostly carry Trachys.  Very hard to find other more unusual cold-hardy palms like the Chamaedoreas, Arenga Engleri, or Mules.

I usually order 1 to 3 gallon sizes through mail for cost savings, since I tend to push the zone (8b) limits and don't want to kill a $300 plant.

Same comment regarding other tropicals like Heliconia, Streletzia, Gingers etc.  Nurseries here don't have many tropicals except a few for sale as houseplants.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Xerarch said:

Man someone posted a pic of that blue Phoenix theophrasti at Kopsick on another thread, it's stunning, if someone could grow a whole field of ones that look just like that you'd really be in business.

You mean this one?  :)

1994731668_Phoenixtheophrasti.thumb.jpg.de4805bc0a5ff693c4a93627b33ca3d9.jpg

  • Like 4

Jon Sunder

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Fusca said:

You mean this one?  :)

1994731668_Phoenixtheophrasti.thumb.jpg.de4805bc0a5ff693c4a93627b33ca3d9.jpg

Would have to tissue culture it. 

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

Howdy, I had a plant nursery in Texas for a decade until 2010, called CollectorPalms. 

I have considered restarting with “Texas Tough Plants” ; lots of native plants and ones that do well here and similar places. Right now it’s still a dream, but I have the availability to get it up and running in a year. I have experience growing & shipping small to large palms. Others, I may need some input.


Why, I think it’s needed, it’s difficult to get certain plants. 10-20 years ago had a lot of good nurseries that are no longer... they retired mostly. Also the recession of 2008 hurt a lot of nurseries. I also have no local competition. No other cool Nurseries. 
 

Question to all.
 

What would you like to see available at the nursery? Specific palms, agaves, yuccas, cactus, trees etc... sizes & prices?

Thanks for the ideas. I have a list already in mind, but want good feedback from others. 

Everyone reading this, give me your thoughts! Please! Thanks in Advance!

Grow what the local nurseries won't, I've bought about 1% of all my plants from local nurseries and have had to buy from out of state or start my own. The more showy native cactus, hardy palms, and the other under represented natives in 1 to 3 gallon sizes would probably be good sellers. Do you have access to a commercial sized greenhouse?

Also, what does the state or USDA inspection entail?

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I have access to a Fairly large greenhouse (maybe 2500 sq ft) on agricultural land. Certain plants could be field grown for a time, then potted. 
Nursery license you do get inspected. But I don t recall what’s involved. I had my house address listed last time and lady came while I was working out of town. 

Edited by Collectorpalms

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The greenhouse really expands your options, you could grow a lot more species of palms or exotic tropicals. Basically the plants California and Florida take for granted, but that Texans are  SOL for local acquisition.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are no local nurseries. You have to drive 2 hours to Austin or almost 1.5 to Houston to find anything other than a box store.
[ Well there is a feed store in Bryan that brings in a few plants, Fruit trees, and vegetables but no palms or anything too different, they don’t know what they are doing so they go downhill pretty quick. ]

 

Edited by Collectorpalms
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What everyone else said.. it seems like North Carolina as a state has this concept down as there are a bunch of local nurseries (most of which don't ship larger stuff) for things that are estabished and can handle their winters.  Would be great to see similar things here.  Honestly, I don't have much to add besides what has been said already but older hardy trunking palms at reasonable prices (Birmingham, Louisiana, Brazoriensis etc) would be great.  I had to go out of state to find all of mine and they're all smaller so I need to be patient in growing them now.

Heck, even finding a reasonably sized S. Mexicana without being gouged in priced around DFW was challenging for me but maybe it's because I didn't know where to look last year.  I'm in, whatever you do!

  • Like 2

Subscribe to my YouTube here  to follow along my Sabal obsession....  Quite possibly one of the biggest Sabal plantings in the US.

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sabalking.texas

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm assuming minors transplant as poorly as small Palmettos, Mexiscanas, etc but at what success rate?  I'm always surprised that there aren't more mature size, regenerated minors for sale in the trade.  I am on the road alot for work and I see a lot of construction in native minor areas.  Do they just bulldoze them? Even at a 30% success rate there had to be some value in trying to salvage them.  I saw a few commercial lots for sale in Beaumont that have literally thousands of minors growing on them.  I know I'm getting a little off topic, but it could apply if you could figure out how to get permission and economically remove them.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’d love to see a website with types of palms available with prices. 
 

palms I would like to see- all types of sabals varieties, windmills, filiferas, butias, mules, date palms, Bismarck’s, European fan palms, and rare hard to find cold hardy palms. 
 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

Howdy, I had a plant nursery in Texas for a decade until 2010, called CollectorPalms. 

I have considered restarting with “Texas Tough Plants” ; lots of native plants and ones that do well here and similar places. Right now it’s still a dream, but I have the availability to get it up and running in a year. I have experience growing & shipping small to large palms. Others, I may need some input.


Why, I think it’s needed, it’s difficult to get certain plants. 10-20 years ago had a lot of good nurseries that are no longer... they retired mostly. Also the recession of 2008 hurt a lot of nurseries. I also have no local competition. No other cool Nurseries. 
 

Question to all.
 

What would you like to see available at the nursery? Specific palms, agaves, yuccas, cactus, trees etc... sizes & prices?

Thanks for the ideas. I have a list already in mind, but want good feedback from others. 

Everyone reading this, give me your thoughts! Please! Thanks in Advance!

If there was ever a dream job that would be it!!! Managing a business keeps you on the phone or behind a computer, but to be able to walk out and just water plants whenever, get some sun, talk with all your green friends lol. 
Your xp has gone way up since you did it last, especially if there’s no local competition, you should do it. 
 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think a nursery that has a reliable supply of more native-ish trees such as golden leadball, red buckeye, and eve's necklace would be great. They are often hard to find in the trade and I think they would also be appreciated by the broader public. Not sure if you can collect and sell nuts from the big century tree as that would go over well with the locals. Obviously, since there's some 'education' to be done, a display garden with a unique variety of palms would be a must. (e.g., with the Brazoria Sabal a must!). 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mass produce Washingtonia Filifera from known hardy source from 50-100 year old trees in San Antonio or Austin. I’ve considered doing this. 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I cannot wrap my head around why it is so difficult to find the hardiest cat palms (C. radicalis and microspadix) around here. I know they're slow growers, but they germinate well and are among the toughest tropical-looking palms we can grow. I have never seen C. radicalis for sale except for at Peckerwood, and C. microspadix is extremely uncommon.

The really tough Cycas other than C. revoluta like C. taitungensis and C. panzhihuaensis should also be more common in the trade.

Finally, Ceratozamias. There's a lot of these that can make it here but are pretty much non-existent.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, tlow said:

What everyone else said.. it seems like North Carolina as a state has this concept down as there are a bunch of local nurseries (most of which don't ship larger stuff) for things that are estabished and can handle their winters.  Would be great to see similar things here.  Honestly, I don't have much to add besides what has been said already but older hardy trunking palms at reasonable prices (Birmingham, Louisiana, Brazoriensis etc) would be great.  I had to go out of state to find all of mine and they're all smaller so I need to be patient in growing them now.

Heck, even finding a reasonably sized S. Mexicana without being gouged in priced around DFW was challenging for me but maybe it's because I didn't know where to look last year.  I'm in, whatever you do!

This was along the line how I have felt. Texas is a massive state, and yet 90% of people have to settle for a Robusta and Pygmy date.
For a few years, the average person is going to be spooked to buy another palm tree. That’s why all the palm enthusiast need to replant Their front yards with Texas Tough ones.

  • Like 1

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

Would have to tissue culture it. 

Would be worth it

Corpus Christi, TX, near salt water, zone 9b/10a! Except when it isn't and everything gets nuked.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, necturus said:

I cannot wrap my head around why it is so difficult to find the hardiest cat palms (C. radicalis and microspadix) around here. I know they're slow growers, but they germinate well and are among the toughest tropical-looking palms we can grow. I have never seen C. radicalis for sale except for at Peckerwood, and C. microspadix is extremely uncommon.

This is quite true.  Long before the freeze I was talking with the owner of Palm Buddha here in SA.  "50 years of experience" from the website yet he had never heard of Chamaedorea radicalis or microspadix.  I showed him some online info and provided my experience with them regarding drought tolerance, early flowering and what I had read about their cold hardiness.  On my next visit I gave him some of my extra C. radicalis seedlings hoping he'd eventually offer some for sale.  To his credit he did have a decent selection of Brahea which I have never seen outside of TexasColdHardyPalms.

  • Like 2

Jon Sunder

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd love to see Yucca Do Nursery 2.0.

Beyond palms, there are a lot of subtropicals from Mexico, southern Brazil/Argentina, and East Asia that are well adapted to 8b-9a/b TX. I'd love to see a wide assortment of evergreen shrubs and trees as well as bromeliads, agaves, aroids, etc. Also, named varieties of subtropical fruit like citrus, loquat, and cold hardy avocados. 

  • Like 7

Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Xenon said:

I'd love to see Yucca Do Nursery 2.0.

Beyond palms, there are a lot of subtropicals from Mexico, southern Brazil/Argentina, and East Asia that are well adapted to 8b-9a/b TX. I'd love to see a wide assortment of evergreen shrubs and trees as well as bromeliads, agaves, aroids, etc. Also, named varieties of subtropical fruit like citrus, loquat, and cold hardy avocados. 

I still have a few Yucca Do plants, and I came into the hobby near the tail end of their existence! Wish I had bought more. Little did I know that a treasure trove of terrestrial bromeliads (e.g. Puyas, Dyckias, Hechtias, Orthophytums) were about to go away and never come back. There was another great online nursery for them at that time that went poof too.

 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some of this has been said already.

What I would be happy to see is:

- Tough palms that are hard to find - Trithrinax, Mazari palms, etc.

- Cycas panzihuaensis and guizhouensis

- Large cold hardy and tough (flood / drought hardy) evergreen trees.  Especially those with large leaves.  Oaks from mexico (Quercus polymorpha, rysophylla, etc.) or asia (Q. glauca, etc.).  Quercus tarahumara (if it's cold hardy enough).  Lithocarpus species.

- Exotic or odd trees that are hard to find - the sole cold-hardy species in otherwise tropical plant families.  Araucaria angustifolia.  Dalbergia hupeana.  Cinnamomum chekiangensis.

- Cold hardy citrus hybrids and other oddball fruit trees (Feijoa, etc.)

Of course rarer plants are a niche business model, any random customer walking in from the street won't know the difference.  But this is the kind of stuff I'd buy.  We have a couple nice "rare plant" nurseries here in SC but they seem to focus mainly on small shrubs and flowering plants.  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Water is a major cost factor.
 

Where is a good place to send off a well water sample so I know what I am dealing with on this new property?

and additionally a soil sample while I am

at it. 

Edited by Collectorpalms
  • Like 1

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

Water is a major cost factor.
 

Where is a good place to send off a well water sample so I know what I am dealing with on this new property?

and additionally a soil sample while I am

at it. 

If you can budget for it, go with rainwater collection. A 2000+ sq ft green house will result in a lot of runoff.

It also doesn't require replacing pumps or the re-drilling upkeep of a well?

Edited by amh
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, amh said:

If you can budget for it, go with rainwater collection. A 2000+ sq ft green house will result in a lot of runoff.

It also doesn't require replacing pumps or the re-drilling upkeep of a well?

There is a rainwater collection not sure how many gallons, and with Texas. I couldn’t count on enough rain.

The well is up and running. Well shouldn’t go dry, it’s along the Brazos River.

  • Like 1

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Collectorpalms said:

There is a rainwater collection not sure how many gallons, and with Texas. I couldn’t count on enough rain.

The well is up and running. Well shouldn’t go dry, it’s along the Brazos River.

Okay, so its not too deep?

You should be able to collect around 62,000 gallons annually in your area, but you might run out in the summer months.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Random thought but I'd double check to make sure HEB can't sue you for the name 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, JohnAndSancho said:

Random thought but I'd double check to make sure HEB can't sue you for the name 

Good point, I dont know if HEB owns it or if it's a state marketing slogan.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You hear Texas Tough Ford, Texas Tough garbage bags... it a Texas slogan etc. 

 

Fairly certain there has never been potted plants labeled with a trademark Texas Tough Plants. I have thought this over for a decade.

I wanted a wide reach name, and it fits the bill. I actually do know a little bit about marketing. I will admit something like Yucca-Do was pretty creative. But you don’t think of palms or oaks with that.


Besides, I’ll never be on Heb’s radar. If I were to get branded pots, then a trademark would be warranted for marketing, but we are talking being able to do wholesale quantities. They would have to have turnover as fast as annuals.

Edited by Collectorpalms
  • Like 4
  • Upvote 1

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, JohnAndSancho said:

Random thought but I'd double check to make sure HEB can't sue you for the name 

what HEB has trademarked is the design on the packages, not the slogan alone.

AS best as I can tell from what I researched just now. 

  • Like 2

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Swolte said:

I think a nursery that has a reliable supply of more native-ish trees such as golden leadball, red buckeye, and eve's necklace would be great. They are often hard to find in the trade and I think they would also be appreciated by the broader public. Not sure if you can collect and sell nuts from the big century tree as that would go over well with the locals. Obviously, since there's some 'education' to be done, a display garden with a unique variety of palms would be a must. (e.g., with the Brazoria Sabal a must!). 

You can buy golden leadball, eve's necklace etc at Central Texas nurseries.  Natives of Texas in Kerrville and Medina Garden Nursery..
Schumacher's in New Braunfels used to carry them.    (I bought a leadball tree from schumachers many years ago) 

I'm sure nurseries in Austin also carry those natives. 

Although Mexican Olive is hard to find!!! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought my sabal brazoria from yucca do.  The sabal brazoria came in one of those skinny 20 ounce mini-tree seedling pot. It had three strap leaves.  11 years later, it has a small trunk.  I also bought a few sabal minors from them. 

Yucca-do even sold a few odd ball oaks..like loquat leaf oak. 

Edited by PricklyPearSATC
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

Water is a major cost factor.
 

Where is a good place to send off a well water sample so I know what I am dealing with on this new property?

and additionally a soil sample while I am

at it. 

Texas A&M soil testing laboratory.

Never used it but a site I frequent has many users that do.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...