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True hardiness of Beccariophoenix alfredii?


Haddock

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Beccariophoenix alfredii aka “Madagascar high land coconut” is a interesting palm, but it’s cold hardiness hasn’t been fully tested. I heard it’s hardy to the lower 20s when it’s young but what about mature specimens, how cold can they handle?

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Unfortunately I had couple nice potted ones fry in about a 27f and a frost that only last a few hours. Cold enough to know they would never work in zone 9a in southeast Texas.

I do wonder if a moderate wrapping  could get them through most winters until they get too large.

ill stay down the butia hybrid path, where they only need protecting during a 20 year event.

Edited by Collectorpalms

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

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2 hours ago, Haddock said:

Beccariophoenix alfredii aka “Madagascar high land coconut” is a interesting palm, but it’s cold hardiness hasn’t been fully tested. I heard it’s hardy to the lower 20s when it’s young but what about mature specimens, how cold can they handle?

I think you might have heard wrong.  It might be hardy to lower 20's when it's mature but like Ryan mentioned it's pretty wimpy as a young palm.  General consensus is that it is a zone 9b palm - there's plenty of threads regarding its hardiness or lack thereof.

Jon Sunder

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The small palm I was going to give Jon(Fusca) was torched at 33*F with frost. I’m still waiting to see if it will recover. If you are in South Carolina don’t waste your money. 

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*removes b. Alfredii from online shopping cart*

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  • 1 year later...

Proveniente da una serra ha preso 0 gradi centigradi alcune notti. coperto anche con l' agritessuto . Fritto per il 70% . E la terza pianta tentata che fa la stessa fine . Non sono resistenti come dicono  . Almeno gli esemplari piccoli non tollerano il freddo .

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6 hours ago, franco toms said:

Proveniente da una serra ha preso 0 gradi centigradi alcune notti. coperto anche con l' agritessuto . Fritto per il 70% . E la terza pianta tentata che fa la stessa fine . Non sono resistenti come dicono  . Almeno gli esemplari piccoli non tollerano il freddo .

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Coming from a greenhouse it took 0 degrees Celsius some nights. also covered with non-woven fabric. 70% Fried. And the third plant tried that ends up the same. They are not as strong as they say. At least the small specimens do not tolerate the cold

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I just noticed frost damage on mine yesterday. I wasn't paying attention. We had a cold snap in late December I think, so this must have happened then. We got down to probably 30 or maybe a little less. My outdoor thermometer says 32, but I don't have a date. This one has been in the ground probably 2 years from a 15 gallon. There is overhead protection from a Queen canopy. Sorry the Phoenix rupicola photo bombed the pictures. It was only these outer fronds that were growing toward the concrete that burned. Everything else growing in other directions toward dirt/ shrubbery looks pretty good. Spear is intact.20230215_160943.thumb.jpg.fb5d36ffa0039d508992dfd4c7ab5851.jpg

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Edited by Patrick

Oakley, California

55 Miles E-NE of San Francisco, CA

Solid zone 9, I can expect at least one night in the mid to low twenties every year.

Hot, dry summers. Cold, wet winters.

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They don't do well in wet cold either.  Would look rough in New Orleans after a winter that stayed above 28-30. An established specimen might come through the mid 20s if the cold is brief and it stays dry but that's about it.

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There's a couple palm sellers here and their intermediate stage (just trunking, spear bases about 7 ft high) b.alfredii's got completely torched at 19F. As did all the queen palms too. One alfredii is in the ground. I am curious who will push new growth in spring, if any. Might only be the big queens that survive this one. Iffy even there, I think. 

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5 minutes ago, Borderzoner said:

There's a couple palm sellers here and their intermediate stage (just trunking, spear bases about 7 ft high) b.alfredii's got completely torched at 19F. As did all the queen palms too. One alfredii is in the ground. I am curious who will push new growth in spring, if any. Might only be the big queens that survive this one. Iffy even there, I think. 

19°F your alfredii are dead, especially if in containers. Queens are likely dead too

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