Jump to content

Ficus socotrana (vasta) planting


Tracy

Recommended Posts

I finally found this Ficus socotrana which has been lumped in with Ficus vasta I understand, but since it was labeled as socotrana, I'll stick with it.  I fell in love with the one at Quail Botanical Garden now San Diego Botanical Garden about a decade  ago or perhaps even longer.  I never started looking for it until about that time.  They had one large specimen for sale at a nursery in Rancho Santa Fe, but when I inquired about purchasing it, was advised it wasn't for sale and would only be used for propagation, and that I should call back the following spring.  I did follow up that following spring and a few more, but there were never any available.  We just removed a parking space along our driveway which opened up a new planting area this week.  We went to Quail Botanical... I mean San Diego Botanical on Saturday for inspirations, and again walked by their Ficus socotrana.  My wife likes the tree as well and I commented that I would plant one in a heartbeat if I could find it.  Yesterday, I suggested we go to a local nursery we can walk to for fun, and lo and behold they had 3 of these in 1 gallon pots.  It didn't take me much time to get home, and plant it out along with a couple of other things I had in pots that were waiting for a home. 

It could be a mistake planting it near our paver back driveway, with the roots these can develop, but I love the trunk color and the low canopy they tend to grow.  I have no idea how slow from a 1 gallon this will grow, but have obviously watched the one at Quail for a long time, so have seen that it hasn't grown out of control large.  I remember Gary Levine has one at his garden in Escondido, and I recall someone else growing this species or the mainland version that the Socotran fig has been lumped in with, Ficus vasta.  Please share if you have experience with either the sub-group of Ficus vasta from Socotran island or Ficus vasta.

20200809-BH3I0815.jpg

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A pair I photographed in 2019, one at the San Diego Zoo and the other is the one at Quail (San Diego) Botanical Garden.  I'll let you guess which photo was the Zoo.  These don't get too high but they do have a spread on them!

20190106-104A2132.jpg

20190330-104A2857.jpg

  • Like 7
  • Upvote 3

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I grew this species when I lived in San Diego. The leaves would sunburn during hot spells, so I moved it to a more shaded location, and within 2 years it grew 3 feet higher. When I was preparing to move I rooted 2 cuttings. They are growing well here, but haven't grown as fast yet.

HTH

Hi 106˚, Lo 74˚

  • Like 1

Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Tracy said:

A pair I photographed in 2019, one at the San Diego Zoo and the other is the one at Quail (San Diego) Botanical Garden.  I'll let you guess which photo was the Zoo.  These don't get too high but they do have a spread on them!

20190106-104A2132.jpg

20190330-104A2857.jpg

 

12 minutes ago, Tom in Tucson said:

I grew this species when I lived in San Diego. The leaves would sunburn during hot spells, so I moved it to a more shaded location, and within 2 years it grew 3 feet higher. When I was preparing to move I rooted 2 cuttings. They are growing well here, but haven't grown as fast yet.

HTH

Hi 106˚, Lo 74˚

Added to my list.. :D 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/10/2020 at 9:30 PM, Tom in Tucson said:

I grew this species when I lived in San Diego. The leaves would sunburn during hot spells, so I moved it to a more shaded location, and within 2 years it grew 3 feet higher. When I was preparing to move I rooted 2 cuttings. They are growing well here, but haven't grown as fast yet.

HTH

Hi 106˚, Lo 74˚

Since mine came out of a greenhouse, I opted to do something I have never done before, which was to create a cover with 30% shade cloth.  No palm, cycad, tree, flower, orchid or bromeliad has ever been so privileged in my garden(s) over the decades.  I will probably remove it in the autumn sometime after the days get shorter, unless I decide to keep it on so I can easily throw something over it to protect it this first winter from overnight cold.  So Tom, a couple of follow up questions on your experience with this tree.  What part of San Diego did you live in where the leaves would sunburn during hot spells?  I'm hoping that won't be an issue given my coastal location about 500 meters east of the ocean.  Second question is what sort of growth rates did you experience and what size did you start with?  If you have any photos of growth on the ones you are growing in Tuscon, it would be great if you can share them.

20200812-BH3I0825.jpg

  • Like 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Tracy said:

Since mine came out of a greenhouse, I opted to do something I have never done before, which was to create a cover with 30% shade cloth.  No palm, cycad, tree, flower, orchid or bromeliad has ever been so privileged in my garden(s) over the decades.  I will probably remove it in the autumn sometime after the days get shorter, unless I decide to keep it on so I can easily throw something over it to protect it this first winter from overnight cold.  So Tom, a couple of follow up questions on your experience with this tree.  What part of San Diego did you live in where the leaves would sunburn during hot spells?  I'm hoping that won't be an issue given my coastal location about 500 meters east of the ocean.  Second question is what sort of growth rates did you experience and what size did you start with?  If you have any photos of growth on the ones you are growing in Tuscon, it would be great if you can share them.

20200812-BH3I0825.jpg

San Diego neighborhood: San Carlos - it borders the towns of Santee and El Cajon (some of the warmest regions in San Diego county besides the desert).

I started with 1 rooted cutting about 6" high. I moved it to a shadier location when it was around 8" high. The only photo I took was when I first planted it. As stated originally it grew much faster when shaded. It also sent out many branches, and had the same form you showed at the botanical garden.

Hi 109˚, Lo 78˚

  • Like 1

Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Tom in Tucson said:

San Carlos - it borders the towns of Santee and El Cajon (some of the warmest regions in San Diego county besides the desert).

I started with 1 rooted cutting about 6" high. I moved it to a shadier location when it was around 8" high. The only photo I took was when I first planted it. As stated originally it grew much faster when shaded. It also sent out many branches, and had the same form you showed at the botanical garden.

Thanks for the details Tom.  Based on where you were in San Carlos, I'm certain the sun is much more intense there than in my yard.  I'll stick with the 30% shade cloth to get it established and hope for the best that once it is established it will do fine in full exposure here.  The one at Quail (SD) Botanical definitely gets filtered light as there are a number of tall trees around it.  That said, even though it's a short distance away, it is on the other side of the next ridge inland from where I live and is noticeably hotter and sunnier there most of the time.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...
On 8/12/2020 at 9:35 PM, Tom in Tucson said:

San Diego neighborhood: San Carlos - it borders the towns of Santee and El Cajon (some of the warmest regions in San Diego county besides the desert).

I started with 1 rooted cutting about 6" high. I moved it to a shadier location when it was around 8" high. The only photo I took was when I first planted it. As stated originally it grew much faster when shaded. It also sent out many branches, and had the same form you showed at the botanical garden.

Hi 109˚, Lo 78˚

After good performance late summer and early Autumn, my Ficus socotrana stalled over winter, which I expected.  It didn't lose any leaves until dropping a couple of the lower ones recently.  I expected it to start pushing out new leaves when my edible fig tree, Ficus carica, started to push out new leaves.  The F carica go dormant during winter here, losing all their leaves.  Even though the F. carica now has small fruit and has been putting out new leaves for weeks now, the growth point on the Ficus socotrana remains at the same stalled point.  I treated them similarly regarding water, not over watering but also not starving them of water over winter, as the sandy soil they are in drains fast.   I'm curious what you experienced in spring coming out of winter with yours.  I probably should go up to Quail... er San Diego Botanical Gardens and talk to someone there that is familiar with their tree.

20210513-BH3I3964.jpg

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 2 retained their leaves this winter, but have not grown much yet. I expect them to start growing faster when the temperature goes up to at least 67˚ at night.

Hi 94˚, Lo 62˚

  • Like 1

Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/16/2021 at 8:18 PM, Tom in Tucson said:

My 2 retained their leaves this winter, but have not grown much yet. I expect them to start growing faster when the temperature goes up to at least 67˚ at night.

Hi 94˚, Lo 62˚

Thanks for the update Tom.  I'll be interested to see when your start growing again.  My wife just commented this morning that she's worried ours isn't going to come back after watching everything else in the garden growing this time of year.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...
On 5/16/2021 at 8:18 PM, Tom in Tucson said:

My 2 retained their leaves this winter, but have not grown much yet. I expect them to start growing faster when the temperature goes up to at least 67˚ at night.

Hi 94˚, Lo 62˚

I wanted to check in on how yours did over summer and open up to anyone else growing this species of Ficus. Mine has dropped all but 3 leaves and didn't move an inch over summer.  I decided to dig it up, but not after finding another one that was a little more established to plant in it's place.  After acclimating it for over a month to my garden, I dug the original and put it in a plant.  From what I could see of the roots, they appeared healthy so I put the original plant in a new pot where I'll move it to a more protected part of the garden for a while.  The replacement Ficus socotrana is below.

20211004-BH3I5679.jpg

20211005-BH3I5699.jpg

  • Like 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine did grow faster once the nights got warmer. I did not move them from their mostly shady location. They are still slower here than they were in San Diego. The leaves are larger by about 25% than they were last year.

Good luck with yours. Once the Santa Ana season is over I'm sure yours will appreciate more sun. I'm still pleased with their appearance overall.

Hi 93˚, Lo 67˚

  • Like 1

Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You better have a big yard.  I believe Palomar College has this next to their theater in the front.  They actually have a big ficus collection in the arboretum.  They're all nice but waaaaay big.  Roots are yuge

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, BigFrond said:

They're all nice but waaaaay big.  Roots are yuge

I have admired the one here in Encinitas at the former Quail Botanical Garden, now San Diego Botanical Garden for well over a decade now.  That was how I learned about this particular species of Ficus.  This seems to have an umbrella, spreading habit when grown in this climate, as both the one at Quail...oops, San Diego Botanical Garden and the one at the Zoo show (photos higher up in this string).  Am I a little worried about the roots?  Yes, as with any Ficus (except my dammaropsis), but it is at the opposite side of my lot from where my water line comes in, and about as far away from my house and sewer lines as one could be and still be on the lot.  The one risk is to my back driveway and detached garage, but hopefully I have enough time that it will be my sons' problem and not mine.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, the umbrella spreading is very nice.  I have the space for one, maybe two but it would take over the whole backyard.  Haha, let your son deal with roots later on is the best solution. The tree form and roots on ficus are second to none in my opinion.  The big roots and buttresses will give the tropical look.  UCSD should be growing these instead of the eucalyptus trees.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/9/2021 at 10:14 AM, BigFrond said:

UCSD should be growing these instead of the eucalyptus trees.

They are growing buildings instead of Eucalyptus trees now.  Many of the groves have disappeared over the decades as new colleges have emerged.  When I went there the 4th college had recently opened (Warren), when my son was getting his degrees there they had 6 and there are 7 now.  Adios Eucalyptus groves.  It has been one of the few UC campuses with room to expand but I don't think Ficus socatrana are on their list.  I would have to bribe them with a lot more in donations than I currently give the alumni association.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

UCSD do have some ficus near the VA hospital.  They are quite nice.  Many are planted near the sidewalk.  UC IRVINE has more ficus variety than UCSD.  They are also much bigger too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
On 10/5/2021 at 4:37 PM, Tracy said:

The replacement Ficus socotrana is below.

A mild Autumn thus far has resulted in the replacement planting in October is putting out new leaves still in December.  I'm hoping this one doesn't go dormant for a year like the other one I dug up and put in a pot.  The one I moved to the pot still looks stalled, but alive with no leaves.  Jury is still out on whether it will come back.

20211203-BH3I6130.jpg

20211203-BH3I6131.jpg

  • Like 2

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
On 10/5/2021 at 4:37 PM, Tracy said:

Mine has dropped all but 3 leaves and didn't move an inch over summer.  I decided to dig it up, but not after finding another one that was a little more established to plant in it's place.  After acclimating it for over a month to my garden, I dug the original and put it in a pot.  From what I could see of the roots, they appeared healthy so I put the original plant in a new pot where I'll move it to a more protected part of the garden for a while.

My original plant that I dug up and put in a pot has finally pushed a new leaf.  It was the first sign of growth after not putting out a single leaf since last spring.  This time of year, the spot that I have moved it to is basically full shade.  I'm not sure what to do with it if it recovers.  I did get the larger replacement plant which I installed where  I extracted this one.  That's a bridge I will cross later, first is insuring this plants survival.

The replacement plant continues pushing out new leaves through winter as well.  It makes me wonder if these are better winter growers in this climate?

20220124-BH3I6591.jpg

20220124-BH3I6588.jpg

  • Like 2

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

An updated photo of the specimen here in Encinitas at the former Quail Botanical Garden, now San Diego Botanic Garden, with someone in the photo for scale.

20220206-BH3I6879.jpg

20220206-BH3I6881.jpg

  • Like 4

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

When we visited the San Diego Botanic Garden on Saturday, I noticed a second Ficus socatrana aka vasta planted just down the hill from the older and larger one.  I'm curious and will have to find out if they grew it from a cutting of their own plant or if this newer and smaller one was sourced elsewhere.  Odd that I had not noticed it before but perhaps it is because I was walking in a different direction on the path than normal, going up it instead of down it.

Newer baby plant and the bigger tree at mid-day in Spring, so pretty shaded during that time of day from canopy overhead.

20220507-BH3I7485.jpg

20220507-BH3I7486.jpg

  • Like 3

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
On 8/10/2020 at 9:30 PM, Tom in Tucson said:

I grew this species when I lived in San Diego. The leaves would sunburn during hot spells, so I moved it to a more shaded location, and within 2 years it grew 3 feet higher. When I was preparing to move I rooted 2 cuttings. They are growing well here, but haven't grown as fast yet.

Tom when I dug up the original one I had planted because it stalled I put it in a pot and moved it to a shady part of the garden.  It took a while to get going again from it's one leaf stage, but it's looking good now and sent out a significant branch.  The replacement has grown consistently as well, but in the heat of summer, the most exposed leaves show some damage.  Below are the replacement which is in full sun from about 10am until late in the afternoon to early evening and the original plant, which was potted and moved to a shadier spot.  So like you described, even here on the coast in full sun when it's hot and clear there is some leaf damage.  The shaded one in a pot, is actually a black plastic pot sitting on bricks inside a ceramic pot.  I can now see the roots coming out of the black pot's weep holes reaching down looking for something to grab onto.  This species seems quite happy in filtered light as an understory tree.  Not quite what I would have expected when thinking of Socatran Island, which makes me think of a more sparse and hot environment.

20220723-BH3I8358.jpg

20220723-BH3I8359.jpg

  • Like 4

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was lucky enough to get a rooted cutting from another PalmTalk member's fantastic tree.   It's always been in a pot-absolutely hated my afternoon sun and suffered for a couple of years before I figured it out; now gets pretty much all day shade and a little extra water and seems to be loving life.

IMG_3805.jpg

IMG_4019.jpg

  • Like 3

San Fernando Valley, California

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/26/2022 at 11:57 AM, Peter said:

It's always been in a pot-absolutely hated my afternoon sun and suffered for a couple of years before I figured it out; now gets pretty much all day shade and a little extra water and seems to be loving life.

I was also noting the difference in leaf size between the one in my full sun versus the partial sun plant.  The one in only limited sun is producing much larger leaves now.

20220803-BH3I8427.jpg

  • Like 2

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/26/2022 at 11:57 AM, Peter said:

I was lucky enough to get a rooted cutting from another PalmTalk member's fantastic tree.

Any idea how difficult it is to get a cutting of this species to root?  I have this somewhat awkward branch growing out the side and actually below the pot level from my potted one. 

20220821-BH3I8689.jpg

20220821-BH3I8688.jpg

  • Like 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Apparently quite difficult from cuttings;  air layering is the way to go I'm told.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

San Fernando Valley, California

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Despite the pot in a pot method of growing this one, the roots have not only escaped the black pot and crawled down the inside of the ceramic pot, they are now coming out looking for soil on the outside.  The roots appear to be trying to crack open the spaces between the pavers.  Life will find a way...

20221013-BH3I9137.jpg

20221013-BH3I9135.jpg

20221013-BH3I9138.jpg

  • Like 3

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

The in ground one is putting out leaves frequently as we finally see spring conditions.   Strange thing occurred today, the sky changed from. Its normal gray to a blue color and there was a bright yellow object visible in the sky.  I wonder what was happening?

20230525_184328.jpg

  • Like 3

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are some photos of Ficus vasta from Socotra, March 2022. I believe these and those in the next post are all from near Hoq Cave, on the northeast coast of the island around 1150 feet / 350 meters above sea level.

Ficus_vasta (1).jpg

Ficus_vasta (2).jpg

Ficus_vasta (3).jpg

Ficus_vasta (4).jpg

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 3

Jason Dewees

Inner Sunset District

San Francisco, California

Sunset zone 17

USDA zone 10a

21 inches / 530mm annual rainfall, mostly October to April

Humidity averages 60 to 85 percent year-round.

Summer: 67F/55F | 19C/12C

Winter: 56F/44F | 13C/6C

40-year extremes: 96F/26F | 35.5C/-3.8C

Link to comment
Share on other sites

More Ficus vasta from Hoq Cave, Socotra, March 2022.
There are two conspicuous ficus species at this site, and I had switched the names based on superficial resemblances. Although Ficus vasta has approximately cordate leaves, it turns out it's not Ficus cordata, as I presumed. That species has a more familiar Ficus elastica / F. macrophylla leaf shape.

Ficus_vasta (5).jpg

Ficus_vasta (6).jpg

Ficus_vasta (7).jpg

Ficus_vasta (8).jpg

Ficus_vasta (9).jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 3

Jason Dewees

Inner Sunset District

San Francisco, California

Sunset zone 17

USDA zone 10a

21 inches / 530mm annual rainfall, mostly October to April

Humidity averages 60 to 85 percent year-round.

Summer: 67F/55F | 19C/12C

Winter: 56F/44F | 13C/6C

40-year extremes: 96F/26F | 35.5C/-3.8C

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, JasonD said:

More Ficus vasta from Hoq Cave, Socotra, March 2022.
There are two conspicuous ficus species at this site, and I had switched the names based on superficial resemblances. Although Ficus vasta has approximately cordate leaves, it turns out it's not Ficus cordata, as I presumed. That species has a more familiar Ficus elastica / F. macrophylla leaf shape.

Ficus_vasta (5).jpg

Ficus_vasta (6).jpg

Ficus_vasta (7).jpg

Ficus_vasta (8).jpg

Ficus_vasta (9).jpg

Interesting that these are full sun in a very dry climate, yet specimens here in California seem to appreciate a little shade and plenty of water.   The old one at the San Diego Zoo is in a sunnier exposure but the one at Quail Botanical Garden is in more filtered light.  Mine is thriving in May gray with full exposure but the su?er has yet to arrive this year.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/27/2023 at 11:44 AM, Tracy said:

Interesting that these are full sun in a very dry climate, yet specimens here in California seem to appreciate a little shade and plenty of water.   The old one at the San Diego Zoo is in a sunnier exposure but the one at Quail Botanical Garden is in more filtered light.  Mine is thriving in May gray with full exposure but the su?er has yet to arrive this year.

The seas around Socotra probably don't get much below 80F. We were there in March and the water felt as warm as Miami's in the summer. It's likely that humidity doesn't drop very low and thus the impact of the sun and leaf transpiration is different compared to our marine layer interrupted by bouts of Santa Ana winds. The skies while I was there were full of dust from nearby continental desert areas, further reducing sun intensity (not palpably to me!). Wikipedia says "It lies 380 kilometers (205 nautical miles) south of the Arabian Peninsula," and it's even closer to Somalia.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Jason Dewees

Inner Sunset District

San Francisco, California

Sunset zone 17

USDA zone 10a

21 inches / 530mm annual rainfall, mostly October to April

Humidity averages 60 to 85 percent year-round.

Summer: 67F/55F | 19C/12C

Winter: 56F/44F | 13C/6C

40-year extremes: 96F/26F | 35.5C/-3.8C

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
On 6/8/2023 at 11:39 AM, JasonD said:

It's likely that humidity doesn't drop very low and thus the impact of the sun and leaf transpiration is different compared to our marine layer interrupted by bouts of Santa Ana winds.

We have had a cooler than normal spring into early summer with a few hours of sunlight on the sunny days.  Despite this, my specimen in the ground has really gone through a growth spurt in the last couple of months.  I'm starting to gain confidence that I will have success with it in my garden.

20230706-BH3I1989.jpg

  • Like 2

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Stopped by a local nursery here in Leucadia, LA Costa Anderson's and saw two potted Ficus socotrana for sale in squat 10 or 15 gallon pots.  What threw me was the size of some of the leaves.  They felt a little more pliable , thinner and fuzzier than others I have seen or growing.  See leaf size which is more like Ficus roxburghii in size.

20230917_113022.jpg

20230917_113033.jpg

  • Like 4

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had no idea they could match Ficus roxburghii in size.

Here's one that may be larger:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xFrEe4F73DE/T9_AoDQ43vI/AAAAAAAABfA/IKdG5ima_Z8/s1600/IMG_1145.JPG

Was there a price tag?

Hi 103˚, Lo 68˚

Edited by Tom in Tucson
  • Like 1

Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, Tom in Tucson said:

Was there a price tag?

 

It's written in wax pencil on the pot wall,  $350.  

  • Like 1

San Francisco, California

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Darold Petty said:

It's written in wax pencil on the pot wall,  $350.  

Good catch. Steeper than I anticipated ... ouch!

Hi 103˚, Lo 68˚

Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Tom in Tucson said:

I had no idea they could match Ficus roxburghii in size.

Here's one that may be larger:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xFrEe4F73DE/T9_AoDQ43vI/AAAAAAAABfA/IKdG5ima_Z8/s1600/IMG_1145.JPG

Was there a price tag?

Hi 103˚, Lo 68˚

Very interesting photo Tom.  That leaf was huge.  Any information on where that specimen is located?  Yes price was a bit steep, but also a much larger plant than what either of mine were.  Mine now have the main trunks at similar diameter as both the ones for sale but are branched at 2 feet or less.  Both of these were taller and likely growing in a greenhouse prior to the retail nursery getting them. Owners of the nursery are friends so will have to ask about it next time I see them.  Both plants were new inventory since I walked through 2 weeks prior.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...