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Do Coconut Trees Grow in North and Central Baja/Sonora Mexico?


veeman55
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If California just isnt warm enough in winter for Coconut growing, have you ever seen Cocos Nucifera in Northern Baja or Northern Sonora like Tijuana, Ensenada, San Felipe Rosarito, Hermosillo, Guaymas, Santa Rosalia, San Ignacio, Guerrero Negro, Ciudad Obregon, Mulege etc.

I know cocos exists in southern baja like Los Cabos and accross the sea in Mazatlan

Edited by veeman55
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A quick search on the forum will provide hours worth of reading on Coconuts and where they grow down the western coast of Mexico.

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I'm a month and a half away from updating my coconuts' status which are 6 miles south of the San Diego border. 

It will be their two year anniversary. 

Don't want to get ahead of myself. I tend to update every 6 months.

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/54533-coconut-palms-1-year-anniversary-in-the-ground-san-diegotijuana-region/

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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There are reports of them growing in Puerto Peñasco (Rocky Point), Sonora. Other Sonora locations which I've seen are:

Hermosillo

Bahía Kino (Kino Bay)

Puerto Libertad

They are quite common in Guaymas and the San Carlos Bay area.

in baja I've seen them growing from Bahía de los Ángeles - south to Cabo.

Hi 102°, Lo 75° - showers

 

Edited by Tom in Tucson
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Tom Birt - Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

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1 hour ago, Tom in Tucson said:

There are reports of them growing in Puerto Peñasco (Rocky Point), Sonora. Other Sonora locations which I've seen are:

Hermosillo

Bahía Kino (Kino Bay)

Puerto Libertad

They are quite common in Guaymas and the San Carlos Bay area.

in baja I've seen them growing from Bahía de los Ángeles - south to Cabo.

Hi 102°, Lo 75° - showers

 

Thats quite impressive

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  • 4 years later...

Resurrecting this thread, as I just located a long median strip full of tall fruiting Cocos nucifera in Puerto Libertad, Sonora (between Guaymas and Puerto Peñasco/Rocky Point) on the Gulf of California. These were documented by the Google Street View cameras just last September (2021). These certainly don't look like recent transplants, as the trunk-bases are weather-worn and the ground doesn't look disturbed in any way; and they seem to be doing fine in a rather harsh environment. Unless someone can find something large-scale in Puerto Peñasco, this may be the northernmost formal, substantial planting of Cocos along the Sonora coast (for now!). Thanks to Google for finally getting some more imagery of this region. These are at 29.91N. See here: Cocos nucifera in Puerto Libertad, Sonora.

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Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 293 ft | z10a | avg Jan 44/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899)

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29 minutes ago, mnorell said:

Resurrecting this thread, as I just located a long median strip full of tall fruiting Cocos nucifera in Puerto Libertad, Sonora (between Guaymas and Puerto Peñasco/Rocky Point) on the Gulf of California. These were documented by the Google Street View cameras just last September (2021). These certainly don't look like recent transplants, as the trunk-bases are weather-worn and the ground doesn't look disturbed in any way; and they seem to be doing fine in a rather harsh environment. Unless someone can find something large-scale in Puerto Peñasco, this may be the northernmost formal, substantial planting of Cocos along the Sonora coast (for now!). Thanks to Google for finally getting some more imagery of this region. These are at 29.91N. See here: Cocos nucifera in Puerto Libertad, Sonora.

Pretty impressive, thank you! I think irrigation is the main issue. Most of the microlimates that far north are in beach towns, and plantings aren't watered as frequently as necessary for them to thrive or to be more common. Probably a lot of people try the and they dry out in between visits. Farthur in town,  away from the water, even some of the Royal poincianas have the stunted growth form, but that coould be due to excessive dryness and intense heat as opposed to cold. Being right on the water probably helps those cocos and I am sure they get supplemental irrigation to an extent.

 

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49 minutes ago, mnorell said:

Resurrecting this thread, as I just located a long median strip full of tall fruiting Cocos nucifera in Puerto Libertad, Sonora (between Guaymas and Puerto Peñasco/Rocky Point) on the Gulf of California. These were documented by the Google Street View cameras just last September (2021). These certainly don't look like recent transplants, as the trunk-bases are weather-worn and the ground doesn't look disturbed in any way; and they seem to be doing fine in a rather harsh environment. Unless someone can find something large-scale in Puerto Peñasco, this may be the northernmost formal, substantial planting of Cocos along the Sonora coast (for now!). Thanks to Google for finally getting some more imagery of this region. These are at 29.91N. See here: Cocos nucifera in Puerto Libertad, Sonora.

Those Coconuts Look very healthy, The ones in the middle of the street were probably planted by the government.

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12 hours ago, mnorell said:

Unless someone can find something large-scale in Puerto Peñasco, this may be the northernmost formal, substantial planting of Cocos along the Sonora coast (for now!). Thanks to Google for finally getting some more imagery of this region. These are at 29.91N. See here: Cocos nucifera in Puerto Libertad, Sonora.

Less than 200 miles south of Yuma or San Diego latitude!

The climate of Puerto penasco compares very favorably to Puerto libertad. In fact it shows the nights in Winter being slightly warmer in the more Northern City, uper vs mid 40s, both near 70 during the day. Both get far too little rain but have decent average humidity. 

Edited by Aceraceae
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Coconuts have been documented pretty extensively in CA on this forum as well (Del Mar, Long Beach, Corona, Coachella Valley... + Tijuana). Not surprising they'd grow throughout Baja in the better microclimates. 

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Yuma AZ has better temperatures than most of northern Mexico other than too hot in the summer (cocos put under high sun canopy) and very low humidity year round, yet they manage to grow so many veggies including cool season annuals there. 

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2 hours ago, Aceraceae said:

Yuma AZ has better temperatures than most of northern Mexico other than too hot in the summer (cocos put under high sun canopy) and very low humidity year round, yet they manage to grow so many veggies including cool season annuals there. 

Yuma is far from a good climate lol.. Yuma can also get chilly in the winter compared to areas in mainland Northwestern Mexico further south.

Best "Coconut growing" climate in N.W. Mexico is from roughly Guayamas / San Carlos, down thru Mazatlan. Further south is even better, but that area would be more the heart of Mexico's Western Coastal region than the nation's Northwestern region. 

Inland from the coast, Alamos, Sonora sits at just over 1K ft elevation ..roughly the same elevation as most neighborhoods here on the East Valley side of Phoenix. Only 1 coconut has been reported from our area... growing fully exposed to the weather, in the ground anyway...  Found a few tall ones down in Alamos, and don't doubt there are more.  Rarely drops below 40F there in the winter, never gets too hot, except for a brief period during the Monte Mojino = dry fore-summer season, ...roughly April thru mid- June ( Same time period as our roast fest here in AZ )

...Unlike most of the lower elevation areas of AZ, ...around Yuma / El Centro esp.  they get quite a lot of rainfall  from mid- June thru the end of September / October,  with occasional rain falling in winter / earliest spring.  Would compare their climate as resembling parts of  FL. except better looking terrain ( surrounded by a massive wall of tall, jagged mountains, which also help keep 97% of serious cold events that might try to sweep down from AZ and New Mexico from reaching the area   ...and maybe a touch warmer through the winter, -on average. 

Far more ideal growing conditions than Yuma, or even Phoenix, which are better than some other areas here in the far Southwest U.S. where Coconuts have done reasonably well.

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Those are all well below 30° latitude. Alamos climate is warm enough to qualify as tropical Savana winter, and gets almost 700 mm of rain. 

For all the hot desert Southwest locations, irrigation is a given for Cocos cultivation that otherwise meet the criteria of being Hardy outside and in ground. Unless they could acclimate the finding groundwater in select spots like native washingtonia do. 

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I found nice coconuts in Hermosillo using Google Street View, and documented it in another thread...I think Cocos are really a lot stronger than people think, but they can only handle chill for about three months (rather than the six months found in the SoCal coastal areas); and they have to have heat during the growing season to make sure they have a good number of 'solar panels' to keep going. But one thing I have learned is that young Cocos should be protected from the heat of the low desert. I believe the La Quinta coconut, which is now exposed in full sun and looks pretty good, was sheltered under other vegetation (a Plumeria and possibly other plants) while it was getting established. I had young Cocos shrivel up and die in full sun a couple of years ago in Rancho Mirage.

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Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 293 ft | z10a | avg Jan 44/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899)

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  • 7 months later...
On 7/16/2018 at 5:56 PM, veeman55 said:

If California just isnt warm enough in winter for Coconut growing, have you ever seen Cocos Nucifera in Northern Baja or Northern Sonora like Tijuana, Ensenada, San Felipe Rosarito, Hermosillo, Guaymas, Santa Rosalia, San Ignacio, Guerrero Negro, Ciudad Obregon, Mulege etc.

I know cocos exists in southern baja like Los Cabos and accross the sea in Mazatlan

Check out this beautiful, good sized coconut in El Golfo de Santa Clara, a little over an hour's drive from the Arizona border. Definitely makes Yuma/San Luis, Arizona seem like possible Cocos territory. The town is located at the northern end of the Gulf of California near the Colorado River Delta. There were some other smaller coconuts in front of the Hotel San Antonio that seem to have been removed when it was renovated, but this one is still there as of a year or two ago and looks really nice!

https://www.google.com/maps/@31.683575,-114.4937887,3a,15y,288.97h,93.16t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1snXEasyqVGz0kX9fBbWhI7w!2e0!7i16384!8i8192?hl=en

image.thumb.png.7fc7587c84c597b4a8c5dadfa556a40b.png

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I'm in Ensenada and have seen very few.

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Melbourne Beach, Florida on the barrier island -two blocks from the Atlantic Ocean and 6 homes from the Indian River Lagoon

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13 minutes ago, weldertom said:

I'm in Ensenada and have seen very few.

If you have seen any there we would love to see pictures! It is much cooler there especially in summer compared to the Gulf of California and desert areas, which makes it more difficult for coconuts to grow, but there are a few in the Ensenada-Tijuana area and several big ones in Southern California in both the desert and by the coast.

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I know there is Coconuts in Hermosillo. 

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I'd be very surprised to see many decent-sized coconuts growing on the Pacific coast of Baja Sur, due to the influences of the cold Pacific, but I have found Cocos on Google Street View in Hermosillo, also in a couple of places fairly far north on the coast of the Gulf of California, and have posted links/photos of these somewhere in a Cocos thread here. Since we know coconuts can be sometimes coaxed into living a somewhat decent life further north in the Coachella Valley, it just makes sense that the probabilities gradually increase for every mile you move south toward Sonora, Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco...

That Cocos in Golfo de Santa Clara looks great!

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Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 293 ft | z10a | avg Jan 44/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899)

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4 hours ago, mnorell said:

I'd be very surprised to see many decent-sized coconuts growing on the Pacific coast of Baja Sur, due to the influences of the cold Pacific, but I have found Cocos on Google Street View in Hermosillo, also in a couple of places fairly far north on the coast of the Gulf of California, and have posted links/photos of these somewhere in a Cocos thread here. Since we know coconuts can be sometimes coaxed into living a somewhat decent life further north in the Coachella Valley, it just makes sense that the probabilities gradually increase for every mile you move south toward Sonora, Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco...

That Cocos in Golfo de Santa Clara looks great!

Makes me wonder if they would have a chance in southern Arizona, I know they’re a few in so cal 

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1 hour ago, South Carolina palms said:

Makes me wonder if they would have a chance in southern Arizona, I know they’re a few in so cal 

They definitely do, especially the Yuma/San Luis area. Check out this big one in Mesa in Central AZ. It really surprises me that they can grow there, with both the insane heat and cool winters, colder than the Coachella Valley, and yet here it is:

 

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And here's a somewhat younger Cocos in Golfo de Santa Clara, and note the Syagrus romanzoffiana to the left. Which one looks better? 

https://www.google.com/maps/@31.6823365,-114.4928148,3a,37.5y,287.21h,90.83t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sJXGDctZ_7L03UZXGifHWiA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

And another one with some trunk.

https://www.google.com/maps/@31.6890481,-114.5006842,3a,75y,310.56h,103.37t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s0JtyR3zoM2ufmW-0KFcuiw!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

Looks like they're not all that rare there...

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Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 293 ft | z10a | avg Jan 44/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899)

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On 8/3/2022 at 9:11 AM, mnorell said:

Resurrecting this thread, as I just located a long median strip full of tall fruiting Cocos nucifera in Puerto Libertad, Sonora (between Guaymas and Puerto Peñasco/Rocky Point) on the Gulf of California. These were documented by the Google Street View cameras just last September (2021). These certainly don't look like recent transplants, as the trunk-bases are weather-worn and the ground doesn't look disturbed in any way; and they seem to be doing fine in a rather harsh environment. Unless someone can find something large-scale in Puerto Peñasco, this may be the northernmost formal, substantial planting of Cocos along the Sonora coast (for now!). Thanks to Google for finally getting some more imagery of this region. These are at 29.91N. See here: Cocos nucifera in Puerto Libertad, Sonora.

Nice looking Coconut Palms for such a desert climate.  Someone is definitely keeping them watered on a regular basis to look that good there, and to be producing nuts.

John

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On 8/3/2022 at 7:33 PM, bubba said:

Impressive and they have coconuts! Thank you!

Definitely receiving supplemental watering to be that big and to have nuts on them.

John

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On 3/9/2023 at 1:22 PM, Alex High said:

Check out this beautiful, good sized coconut in El Golfo de Santa Clara, a little over an hour's drive from the Arizona border. Definitely makes Yuma/San Luis, Arizona seem like possible Cocos territory. The town is located at the northern end of the Gulf of California near the Colorado River Delta. There were some other smaller coconuts in front of the Hotel San Antonio that seem to have been removed when it was renovated, but this one is still there as of a year or two ago and looks really nice!

https://www.google.com/maps/@31.683575,-114.4937887,3a,15y,288.97h,93.16t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1snXEasyqVGz0kX9fBbWhI7w!2e0!7i16384!8i8192?hl=en

image.thumb.png.7fc7587c84c597b4a8c5dadfa556a40b.png

Looks like a Green Malayan.  Definitely a Malayan Dwarf, based on the smaller size of the leaves and the structure of the crown, as well as the narrow straight trunk,, so that is something to consider too about the area it is planted in, since Malayans are less hardy than the Mexican Tall. I wish I could get a Green Malayan to grow to that height here where I live (I would actually be happy to have any variety of Coconut Palm grow to that size in my yard, but unfortunately, I live in a cold pocket here in Flour Bluff on the east side of Corpus Christi).  There was Green Malayan Dwarf that was about that size with a few small to medium sized nuts on it a few years ago, about 7.5 miles from my house, on the south side of a two story house on the bayside of Ocean Dr. with the house backing up to the widest part of Corpus Christi Baby, so it was growing in a perfect microclimate for Coconut Palms in Corpus Christi.  Unfortunately as it was still recovering from the 2011 Freeze, and the WORST Drought in Texas History, the owners of the home put the home up for sale, and had their palms trimmed.  The palm trimmers BUTCHERED the Coconut Palm and it died within a couple of months.  I was told that before the 2011 Freeze, there was a mature Coconut Palm in a yard on the Laguna Madre in Flour Bluff, that had a few nuts on it, and one on North Padre Island back then that was about 25 ft. tall in overall height with some medium sized nuts on it (again don't know what variety, as I never saw the palm; possibly a Maymex hybrid sprouted from a Mexican nut washed up on the beach here).

John

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17 hours ago, Alex High said:

They definitely do, especially the Yuma/San Luis area. Check out this big one in Mesa in Central AZ. It really surprises me that they can grow there, with both the insane heat and cool winters, colder than the Coachella Valley, and yet here it is:

 

Wow, in Arizona of all places!!!  WOW!!!

John

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16 hours ago, mnorell said:

And here's a somewhat younger Cocos in Golfo de Santa Clara, and note the Syagrus romanzoffiana to the left. Which one looks better? 

https://www.google.com/maps/@31.6823365,-114.4928148,3a,37.5y,287.21h,90.83t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sJXGDctZ_7L03UZXGifHWiA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

And another one with some trunk.

https://www.google.com/maps/@31.6890481,-114.5006842,3a,75y,310.56h,103.37t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s0JtyR3zoM2ufmW-0KFcuiw!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

Looks like they're not all that rare there...

Nice!!!  Probably the Mexican Tall variety, or maybe Pacific Tall.

John

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On 3/10/2023 at 7:49 AM, Alex High said:

They definitely do, especially the Yuma/San Luis area. Check out this big one in Mesa in Central AZ. It really surprises me that they can grow there, with both the insane heat and cool winters, colder than the Coachella Valley, and yet here it is:

 

The daytime highs are probably higher than most places in the southwestern US I Assume. Also the dry desert climate makes the cold not "bite" nearly as hard. 

I tried a Coco and Latania in pots outside this winter to see if they could survive long periods with 5 celcius and less every night. They are still alive, but definitely needs to recover from some cold damage. These where very small plants that came directly from a completely tropical climate in Veracruz and I did nothing to climate them. Just put them out in November.  

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On 3/10/2023 at 4:53 AM, South Carolina palms said:

Makes me wonder if they would have a chance in southern Arizona, I know they’re a few in so cal 

Yuma to Gila Bend, to Phoenix  ( If you're driving east along I-8 ) only...  Rest of S. AZ from roughly Ajo ( ..west of there actually ) to the AZ/ MEX/ New Mexico border is higher elevation ( Nogales, 4kft, Sierra Vista, 4.5kft, Douglas, 4kft for example )  and cold in winter ( 9a-8a west to east )

That said, the last map was done in 2012.. Some areas, such as around Tucson, ..and where i'm located in Chandler, are a touch warmer than would be assumed by the map..

1254308592_Screenshot2023-03-13at00-03-42ArizonaInteractive2012USDAPlantHardinessZoneMap.thumb.png.7aae14c649b86d02e25c1627af59d2b2.png

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On 3/10/2023 at 12:39 AM, mnorell said:

I'd be very surprised to see many decent-sized coconuts growing on the Pacific coast of Baja Sur, due to the influences of the cold Pacific,

That Cocos in Golfo de Santa Clara looks great!

Just a couple snapshots from Todo Santos...  lots there, and some in nearby San Ignacio ( 3rd picture..  )

962953469_coconuttodosantos2.jpg.767614ccaa852de7e318e664f0865270.jpg

1501980834_coconuttodosantos.jpg.8175cad785ebdff05bf14c91120f47c2.jpg

1501476507_coconuttodosantos3.jpg.26b0abc476656bbbd7ba7509c294aa7e.jpg

Makes sense considering the 11a-12b zone / warmer water year round down there..

16325047_Screenshot2023-03-13at00-35-09MexicoInteractivePlantHardinessZoneMap.png.0c7a0bc9d2f2b9b6d757924e39b26f0f.png

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13 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Just a couple snapshots from Todo Santos...  lots there, and some in nearby San Ignacio ( 3rd picture..  )

962953469_coconuttodosantos2.jpg.767614ccaa852de7e318e664f0865270.jpg

1501980834_coconuttodosantos.jpg.8175cad785ebdff05bf14c91120f47c2.jpg

1501476507_coconuttodosantos3.jpg.26b0abc476656bbbd7ba7509c294aa7e.jpg

Makes sense considering the 11a-12b zone / warmer water year round down there..

16325047_Screenshot2023-03-13at00-35-09MexicoInteractivePlantHardinessZoneMap.png.0c7a0bc9d2f2b9b6d757924e39b26f0f.png

Playas Las Tunas/ Tortugueros Las Playitas AC, BCS. and from outside " The Green Room" Restaraunt, further north near El Chamizal. ( pic. #2)

494401995_coconuttodosantos4.jpg.877229fd13bb955d977c461785822c40.jpg

784630362_coconuttodosantos5.jpg.237be6c4f64585a8b8a15036bd8dc6ea.jpg

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On 3/10/2023 at 2:39 AM, mnorell said:

I'd be very surprised to see many decent-sized coconuts growing on the Pacific coast of Baja Sur, due to the influences of the cold Pacific, but I have found Cocos on Google Street View in Hermosillo, also in a couple of places fairly far north on the coast of the Gulf of California, and have posted links/photos of these somewhere in a Cocos thread here. Since we know coconuts can be sometimes coaxed into living a somewhat decent life further north in the Coachella Valley, it just makes sense that the probabilities gradually increase for every mile you move south toward Sonora, Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco...

That Cocos in Golfo de Santa Clara looks great!

There are quite a few pretty far up the Pacific Coast of Baja, here are some in Guerrero Negro on the border of BC and BCS.

https://www.google.com/maps/@27.9675799,-114.0442937,3a,29y,220.98h,93.56t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sF5E8NYgykbEJe1X5t6dguA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

image.thumb.png.874d162725b5b018fd9e6d0e6ac3d3f9.png

And of course there are some far north of there. I will post my YouTube videos below from my YouTube channel Palm Planet of a big coconut growing in cool Del Mar, California and another beautiful one in Santa Ana, CA. Pretty surprising to see them so close to the ocean that far north, the Del Mar one is literally right next to the beach.

 

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On 3/13/2023 at 12:36 AM, Silas_Sancona said:

Just a couple snapshots from Todo Santos...  lots there, and some in nearby San Ignacio ( 3rd picture..  )

Makes sense considering the 11a-12b zone / warmer water year round down there..

16325047_Screenshot2023-03-13at00-35-09MexicoInteractivePlantHardinessZoneMap.png.0c7a0bc9d2f2b9b6d757924e39b26f0f.png

Sorry...late-night brain-flip, I see I mis-wrote my comment...When I said I didn't expect to see decent-sized coconuts on the Pacific coast of Baja Sur, I actually meant the opposite, the Pacific coast of Baja California (Norte). It makes sense that they'd look good around the Cape Region including Todos Santos and I imagine they do all right in general in most of Pacific coastal BCS, since at some point latitude has to smooth the climate out a bit despite the incredibly powerful chill of the California Current. But of course things get much better on the other side of the Cape and up into the Gulf where they get the benefit of those much warmer waters and really warm summer nights so the palms can really crank.

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Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 293 ft | z10a | avg Jan 44/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899)

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Anyone know what climate zone Chihuahua is in and have seen what grows there? 

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16 minutes ago, Palmfarmer said:

Anyone know what climate zone Chihuahua is in and have seen what grows there? 

Have to do some Google Touring, but here are the zones for Chihuahua. Highly doubt there will be any Coconuts there though.

635897886_Screenshot2023-03-16at22-52-56MexicoInteractivePlantHardinessZoneMap.thumb.png.52a83e68757a627fe7aa7c954b4914a7.png


...and down toward where you're located..

571689323_Screenshot2023-03-16at22-53-42MexicoInteractivePlantHardinessZoneMap.thumb.png.e74915a38db88e0787a361545340a8c1.png

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Durango has much better growing zones than Chihuaha does.

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5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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Here are palms, including coconuts, in San Felipe, MX! 

270F788E-B89A-412F-B27E-FB5FB8596FC1.jpeg

8EF8FA69-8CF0-4960-BAE0-88CA36D976F4.jpeg

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I'm always up for learning new things!

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