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Anyone have any pictures of Spanish Moss at its northern limits In North Carolina and Virginia? Maybe even parts of Arkansas. I used to have loads of pictures from First Landing State Part but my phone with the pictures broke before I could back them up. I also saw some near the Great Dismal Swamp in Virginia, but only a few clumps. Here is the Virginia Spanish Moss native range. 

SmartSelectImage_2017-09-28-19-17-20.png

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PalmTreeDude

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Spanish moss does well all through the fall winter and spring here. Its the summer that eventually kills it. 

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The following photos are from First Landing State Park, Virginia Beach, VA.

P1000350.JPG

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USDA Hardiness Zone 7b/8a

AHS Heat Zone 7

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Here is the few pictures of First Landing State Park that I still have, the rest got deleted when I got my old phone, lesson learned, always back up your old phones photos before you upgrade. Here are two I saved before I even thought about backing all of my photos up. This is from February 2017. 

Picture1.JPG

Picture2.JPG

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PalmTreeDude

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The Spanish moss in Northern LA/Southern Arkansas looked just fine after single digits this year.

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On 3/12/2018, 5:22:06, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

The Spanish moss in Northern LA/Southern Arkansas looked just fine after single digits this year.

It can survive single digits? I heard that it can survive in warmer 7b areas but was not sure about it. It is a bit hardier than I thought. 

PalmTreeDude

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Yes it survives.  The only thing that kills it here is our July-September 30-80days without a drop of rain.

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Spanish moss is an indigenous plant to Southern Virginia. It is perfectly adapted for the winters in this location. 

Zone 8a/8b Greenville, NC 

Zone 9a/9b Bluffton, SC

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Not the northernmost, but it's slightly farther inland than First Landing. These were taken at Lake Drummond in Suffolk/ Chesapeake. It's not very noticeable in the first photo.

1108201335~2.jpg

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USDA Hardiness Zone 7b/8a

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1108201248_HDR~2.jpg

There were resurrection ferns on many of the trees as well, as seen in this photo.

Edited by SEVA
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USDA Hardiness Zone 7b/8a

AHS Heat Zone 7

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I know I’ve shared photos from Virginia Beach before, but I hadn’t been to this area until recently.

CC7783E1-E798-428F-9FC6-D9E445CE2112.jpeg

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USDA Hardiness Zone 7b/8a

AHS Heat Zone 7

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On 11/9/2020 at 10:00 PM, SEVA said:

1108201328_HDR~2.jpg

I live next to a marsh right close to the Dismal Swamp.  I'm planning on planting some Spanish moss and resurrection ferns in the woods in my yard soon.  I miss being further South, so it will help ease my feeling of being too far North.

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God bless America...

and everywhere else too.

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I once found article about this upon a Google search.  I think some guy did a study and found some in VA obviously, but I think he even found a piece in MD if I remember correctly.

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there is spanish moss at the first landing site in va beach you the moss there survived 1f

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
~ Neil deGrasse Tyson

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Damn Tillandsia in Washington dc? 

I am growing one in Eastern Austria. Tbh not sure if its dead already. First winter outside. Our low was -7°C for a few hours. 

 

20220102_154149.jpg

20220102_154158.jpg

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On 3/15/2018 at 8:54 PM, PalmTreeDude said:

It can survive single digits? I heard that it can survive in warmer 7b areas but was not sure about it. It is a bit hardier than I thought. 

Great photos on this post.  Always enjoyed seeing Spanish moss in the cypress stands and swamp areas of the southeast US. 
 

I’m approximately 500 miles north of you and the VA northern range of the moss.  In RI, directly along the Atlantic coast line  we are marginally 7a. Gets much colder away from the coast. These photos below are some type of green moss or fluffy lichen that coats the trees here and I see them only within 2 miles or so from the ocean or Narragansett bay coast. The trees are shaggy green all around and you really notice them when the leaves are gone. I took these photos in Misquamicut, RI today which is likely among the most mild microclimates in RI, where New England approaches the mid Atlantic states; the RI & CT Atlantic coast meets with Montauk, Long Island and Block Island waters. On the hottest summer days around 4 pm, like clockwork, the fog bank would roll in and engulf all the forests and trees right along the coast.

FCC6189B-C9C4-4848-A41B-3FFB6D92DF67.thumb.jpeg.2831b9ac89d4c055bf64d793061b48c1.jpeg661F82B8-AE9C-4084-8CA6-605A32E9FCDA.thumb.jpeg.8c5aec8cae9cd3f7cd6a8fcac3603a33.jpeg7CD79E78-3BCF-4E75-93C1-4A191D33BDEB.thumb.jpeg.9ecd9a62036dcd23b5453b01fe1b1966.jpegA005D7C1-498C-4DDE-98FF-7FB5D3241CAC.thumb.jpeg.a61ca0dcaf476bb4e1af686f9f6f846c.jpeg32AAA748-D2FB-47FC-AB29-10AFA9BADACD.thumb.jpeg.9322885352edb372ae77b8fe1703d93b.jpeg

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14 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

Great photos on this post.  Always enjoyed seeing Spanish moss in the cypress stands and swamp areas of the southeast US. 
 

I’m approximately 500 miles north of you and the VA northern range of the moss.  In RI, directly along the Atlantic coast line  we are marginally 7a. Gets much colder away from the coast. These photos below are some type of green moss or fluffy lichen that coats the trees here and I see them only within 2 miles or so from the ocean or Narragansett bay coast. The trees are shaggy green all around and you really notice them when the leaves are gone. I took these photos in Misquamicut, RI today which is likely among the most mild microclimates in RI, where New England approaches the mid Atlantic states; the RI & CT Atlantic coast meets with Montauk, Long Island and Block Island waters. On the hottest summer days around 4 pm, like clockwork, the fog bank would roll in and engulf all the forests and trees right along the coast.

FCC6189B-C9C4-4848-A41B-3FFB6D92DF67.thumb.jpeg.2831b9ac89d4c055bf64d793061b48c1.jpeg661F82B8-AE9C-4084-8CA6-605A32E9FCDA.thumb.jpeg.8c5aec8cae9cd3f7cd6a8fcac3603a33.jpeg7CD79E78-3BCF-4E75-93C1-4A191D33BDEB.thumb.jpeg.9ecd9a62036dcd23b5453b01fe1b1966.jpegA005D7C1-498C-4DDE-98FF-7FB5D3241CAC.thumb.jpeg.a61ca0dcaf476bb4e1af686f9f6f846c.jpeg32AAA748-D2FB-47FC-AB29-10AFA9BADACD.thumb.jpeg.9322885352edb372ae77b8fe1703d93b.jpeg

Not sure what sp. it would be there, but see a couple, similar looking Lichen sp. hanging from Oaks, Madrone, Doug. Fir, and Redwoods in the coastal mountains of CA. Esp. in " fog belt " areas facing the ocean.  One species looks a lot like ( and hangs from trees like ) Spanish Moss.  Supposedly edible too ( Don't know who'd want to eat it, haha )

 

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12 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Not sure what sp. it would be there, but see a couple, similar looking Lichen sp. hanging from Oaks, Madrone, Doug. Fir, and Redwoods in the coastal mountains of CA. Esp. in " fog belt " areas facing the ocean.  One species looks a lot like ( and hangs from trees like ) Spanish Moss.  Supposedly edible too ( Don't know who'd want to eat it, haha )

Ahh, very interesting Silas and makes sense with them benefiting from the coastal fog zones. Species attempting zone stretching all on their own.

Below a close up photo of one clump that fell on the ground.  Anyhow, not meaning to hijack OP’s post on Spanish moss but curious if this is a temperate climate or maritime relative of Spanish moss or a lichen/other.

2E6FFCCC-F583-48B9-AA47-8F3BB88DD855.thumb.jpeg.25a7d9f3482414b1444dd11a11af4bb0.jpeg

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5 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

Ahh, very interesting Silas and makes sense with them benefiting from the coastal fog zones. Species attempting zone stretching all on their own.

Below a close up photo of one clump that fell on the ground.  Anyhow, not meaning to hijack OP’s post on Spanish moss but curious if this is a temperate climate or maritime relative of Spanish moss or a lichen/other.

2E6FFCCC-F583-48B9-AA47-8F3BB88DD855.thumb.jpeg.25a7d9f3482414b1444dd11a11af4bb0.jpeg

Lichen... I think the flat parts are where spores are produced / released,  Although many ( or most? )  can reproduce asexually .IE: dried bits breaking off established specimens, and be dispersed to new spots by the wind..

Might look over this site to see which sp. that one is.. Are supposedly the species that would be native to Rhode Is.   https://lichenportal.org/cnalh/collections/misc/collprofiles.php?collid=151      Looks like some sort of sea Anemone. :greenthumb:

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5 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Lichen... I think the flat parts are where spores are produced / released,  Although many ( or most? )  can reproduce asexually .IE: dried bits breaking off established specimens, and be dispersed to new spots by the wind..

Might look over this site to see which sp. that one is.. Are supposedly the species that would be native to Rhode Is.   https://lichenportal.org/cnalh/collections/misc/collprofiles.php?collid=151      Looks like some sort of sea Anemone. :greenthumb:

@piping plovers

Did a more in depth search since the site i linked is a bit daunting ( and apparently includes Lichens from around the world, vs. just those you might find locally ) ..Anyway, Not exact on the species, but appears to belong to the Genus Usnea, and are commonly referred to as " Beard Lichens "  https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/67747-Usnea


On iNaturalist, found several observations of " Bristly " Beard Lichen, Usnea hirta  in / around Newport.  Appears that species ..or some other similar sp. is native here ( in the mountains ) and all over coastal California.

Interesting that the species name of Spanish Moss shares the Usne  part of this group of Lichens. 

Btw, the Lichen almost everyone in CA mistakes for Spanish Moss? is this.. https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/49578-Ramalina-menziesii 

Another sp,  From the Pac. N.W. and Maine, https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/122681-Usnea-longissima   could also be easily mistaken for the real deal also..  Some other look - alikes in the same Genus / couple other genus too.

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56 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

appears to belong to the Genus Usnea, and are commonly referred to as " Beard Lichens " 

Awesome job researching there Silas! I think the Usnea lichen is it.   

Interesting knowing that the air around me is clean, lol—- am reading that the Usnea genus can sometimes be used as a bioindicator, because it tends to only grow in those regions where the air is clean,[13] and of high quality.  Also, the pharmaceutical uses of this genus, treatment of pneumonia, etc. is fascinating.

Those photos of the bearded species from CA coast (Ramalina menziesii, the lace lichen) are really impressive and I can see why they could be confused with Spanish moss. They are what I think of when seeing photos of the temperate climate rainforests of pacific northwest coast and Alaska.  Very primeval looking.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

Awesome job researching there Silas! I think the Usnea lichen is it.   

Interesting knowing that the air around me is clean, lol—- am reading that the Usnea genus can sometimes be used as a bioindicator, because it tends to only grow in those regions where the air is clean,[13] and of high quality.  Also, the pharmaceutical uses of this genus, treatment of pneumonia, etc. is fascinating.

Those photos of the bearded species from CA coast (Ramalina menziesii, the lace lichen) are really impressive and I can see why they could be confused with Spanish moss. They are what I think of when seeing photos of the temperate climate rainforests of pacific northwest coast and Alaska.  Very primeval looking.

 

 

Knew about the " bioindicator " aspect.. Areas i used to hike back in CA.  where there were a lot of Lichens always had really clean - smelling air that smelled earthy, ..but not " dirty " ..hard to describe i guess, lol.   Did not realize it was used in the Pharm. industry.

Used to think that stuff was Spanish moss as a kid before a park ranger pointed out the difference while attending a nature walk. 

Whats funny is people in California hold a similar " Don't pick up pieces off the ground " thought  about Lace Lichen  ..similar to the thought that Chiggers will flock to  Spanish Moss ( in the southeast / FL. ) In CA, it would be Ticks being referred to instead of Chiggers..  Yea, i'm sure you could find them in some fallen clumps, but never did myself ..or become a meal for Chiggers whenever i'd collected clumps of Spanish Moss on the ground in FL.

Agree, whether Spanish Moss / other Tillandsia,  or Lace Lichen / related " stringy " Lichen sp.  lends a very primitive feel to where ever you see a lot of it.  Would be neat to see both Spanish Moss and it's look -alikes growing side by side on the same branch / tree.

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On 1/5/2022 at 3:57 PM, piping plovers said:

Great photos on this post.  Always enjoyed seeing Spanish moss in the cypress stands and swamp areas of the southeast US. 
 

I’m approximately 500 miles north of you and the VA northern range of the moss.  In RI, directly along the Atlantic coast line  we are marginally 7a. Gets much colder away from the coast. These photos below are some type of green moss or fluffy lichen that coats the trees here and I see them only within 2 miles or so from the ocean or Narragansett bay coast. The trees are shaggy green all around and you really notice them when the leaves are gone. I took these photos in Misquamicut, RI today which is likely among the most mild microclimates in RI, where New England approaches the mid Atlantic states; the RI & CT Atlantic coast meets with Montauk, Long Island and Block Island waters. On the hottest summer days around 4 pm, like clockwork, the fog bank would roll in and engulf all the forests and trees right along the coast.

FCC6189B-C9C4-4848-A41B-3FFB6D92DF67.thumb.jpeg.2831b9ac89d4c055bf64d793061b48c1.jpeg661F82B8-AE9C-4084-8CA6-605A32E9FCDA.thumb.jpeg.8c5aec8cae9cd3f7cd6a8fcac3603a33.jpeg7CD79E78-3BCF-4E75-93C1-4A191D33BDEB.thumb.jpeg.9ecd9a62036dcd23b5453b01fe1b1966.jpegA005D7C1-498C-4DDE-98FF-7FB5D3241CAC.thumb.jpeg.a61ca0dcaf476bb4e1af686f9f6f846c.jpeg32AAA748-D2FB-47FC-AB29-10AFA9BADACD.thumb.jpeg.9322885352edb372ae77b8fe1703d93b.jpeg

That's pretty neat! 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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PalmTreeDude

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On 11/17/2020 at 11:31 PM, SEVA said:

Virginia Beach, VA

142E9610-C5A7-4067-BC60-A7445D0C6E12.jpeg

wow! @SEVA is this also at First Landing SP?

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