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Pritchardia Revisited


realarch
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Nice pictures Matt. Your minor appears to be the same as the first one I posted, so I guess that settles that. The last unknown is just one of the harder ones to ID. A number of them at a young age exhibit the large wedge shaped leaves that are green on both sides & are just impossible to tell apart. I have an unknown species, a munroi, a forbesiana, a maideniana & a kaalae, which are nearly indistinguishable to me at a young age, even though I stare at them all the time. At some level, I guess you just have to trust that the grower sold you what he said he did.

Bret

 

Coastal canyon area of San Diego

 

"In the shadow of the Cross"

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Tim,

Thought I would re-post these habitat pictures of Pritchardia kahukuensis from the north shore of Oahu. Awesome and fairly easy hike up to these. Nice nativeish

forest at the top. Those habitat pictures of P. marti are really nice, shows the difference between in a deep valley, and how tall and large they get, compared to the ones on

the ridges that are very stunted from the harsh winds.

aloha

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Wow Colin, those are really different looking. Almost a Cocothrinax or Thrinax look. 

The P. martii at the lower elevations were from seed washed down from the ridges and higher slopes.

The ones I saw were next to runoff gulches and small streams. 

Hmmmm...that hike sounds intriguing. 

Tim

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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Well while we are on a roll here are some pictures I just took at Hoomaluhia gardens , Oahu today.

Pritchardia waialeale, native of Kauai, powerline trail area.

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Here are some pictures of Pritchardia napalensis at Hoomaluahia gardens Oahu, . Same leaf look as P. minor, but no coloration underneath. from Kauai powerline trail areaIMG_0789.thumb.jpg.b9ea4fa6f191a76297253

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All these superb photos of well-grown and habitat Pritchardias has motivated me to add some more photos.

First, glabrata. This was grown from seed collected in Amy Greenwell Garden in Captain Cook. The proprieter told me that his seed was collected from the type locality on Maui. Full sun location, 5-gal orange bucket provides scale. My palm, planted April 2012:

glabrata_MLM_091517.thumb.JPG.0915f715e3

When I was at the National Tropical Botanical Garden on Kauai, I obtained seeds of P. lanaiensis, which Hodel has synonymized with glabrata. I planted four of these out in Aug 2012, again in open sun locations. The largest of the three that remain is this:

lanaiensis_MLM_091517.thumb.JPG.b0ac24c2

The overall look is somewhat similar, though i still have some reservations. Neither has produced fruit, so I can't compare.

 

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Mike Merritt

Big Island of Hawaii, windward, rainy side, 740 feet (225 meters) elevation

165 inches (4,200 mm) of rain per year, 66 to 83 deg F (20 to 28 deg C) in summer, 62 to 80 deg F (16.7 to 26.7 Deg C) in winter.

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One of my original concerns about identifying Pritchardias was how to distinguish between arecina and martii, both having dark green leaves with whitish or brownish undersides. Having grown both to flowering and seeding maturity, I no longer have a problem. Here's why, preceded by a photo of my largest arecina:

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Arecina is more robust and faster growing than martii. The leaves are more folded, and the inflorescences are a lot longer. The leaf undersides are whitish as shown in the following photo: The nest photo shows some developing fruit, which on my trees are somewhat smaller than those of martii.

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The following photo shows my largest martii, again growing in full sun:

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The leaves are slightly cup-shaped, and have undersides that are brownish, rather than whitish. (It's hard to get the underside coloration to show on the whole plant pictures.) Flowers and fruits are held close in by the plant:

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More to come later, unless there are loud objections.

 

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Mike Merritt

Big Island of Hawaii, windward, rainy side, 740 feet (225 meters) elevation

165 inches (4,200 mm) of rain per year, 66 to 83 deg F (20 to 28 deg C) in summer, 62 to 80 deg F (16.7 to 26.7 Deg C) in winter.

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Pritchardia is one of my favorite Genera. P. pacifica is my favorite of the genus with it's flat leaves with the shallow divisions, but we're a bit too cold for them here. The Hawaiian species seem do better during the winter here, but not as well during the summers. I've noticed that if I start with 10-20 seeds, I usually end up with one plant that survives the summers. Here are the highlights of mine:

P. beccariana. This is my favorite Hawaiian species and it seems to do very well here under the right conditions.

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P. Schattaueri. This species does okay here, but is quite slow growing. IMG_0331.thumb.JPG.c08dcd6399e7231bb7099

P. munroi on the left and P. remota on the right:

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P. hillebrandii under the plumeria:

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Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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I'd like to show some pictures of Big Island native loulus. Mine shown are all growing in full sun and the orange bucket used for scale is a 5-gaL P. beccariana is native to my own east Hawaii Island environment. Here is one of mine as it appeared in December 2010. Seeds were from a planting in a park in downtown Hilo. They were planted by a local group known as the Outdoor Circle, the plants or seeds contributed by the late Donn Carlsmith. The trees in the park, unfortunately, were removed several years ago.

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Here are my pair as they appear today.

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They have been flowering and developing fruit for almost a year. They are not reserved about flowering. Flowers and fruit are held fairly close in to the trunk. It's hard to keep weeds from sprouting above the petiole bases.

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So far, I've only gotten three seeds to sprout, but I expect better with time.

 

Now, for P. schattaueri, a west Big Island palm that enjoys a somewhat drier environment than P. beccariana. This species is very rare in the wild, only 12 trees remaining on the farm of the late George Schattauer. Here is my largest plant. Seeds were from a planting in a west coast park, the Amy Greenwell Garden in Captain Cook.

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I recently revisited the Koko Crater Bot. Garden on Oahu, where they have a grove of these palms. Here is one example:

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There is a distinctive "droopy-leaf" look to this palm when mature. The highly divided leaves have pendant leaf tips, and older leaves hang down and appear to collapse around the margins while retaining their glossy green color. Although one of the tallest loulus, I have found it to be relatively slow growing.

Finally, I have a single specimen of P. lanigera. Seed was from the Nat. Tropical Bot. Garden in southern Kauai.

lanigera_MLM_091717.thumb.JPG.2b736a1f05

Leaves of this species are usually cup-shaped, not folded.

 

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Mike Merritt

Big Island of Hawaii, windward, rainy side, 740 feet (225 meters) elevation

165 inches (4,200 mm) of rain per year, 66 to 83 deg F (20 to 28 deg C) in summer, 62 to 80 deg F (16.7 to 26.7 Deg C) in winter.

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Nice pictures and history Mike, any idea if it is possible to go the farm and see the P. schattaueri?? Have you had the chance to see them in person?

aloha

Colin 

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Hopefully next Saturday, I'll be able to see P. schauttaueri in habit and the planted offspring as part of The Nature Conservancy work day. They are heavily involved in their maintenance and own adjacent parcels where young palms are being propagated. 

I hope to post some photos.

Tim

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Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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Yes, I knew that the IPS is working with the Nature Conservancy to protect P. schattaueri, also P. lanigera and another species, maybe P. beccariana, which is not endangered at present.

Here's documentation of three Kauai Island species that I am growing. First up is P. minor. Full sun, hillside location, 5-gal orange bucket for scale. I planted four in March 2013, of which two survive. They have been slow growers. Undersides have tomentum that should be more evident as they grow larger.

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Here is the whitish/brownish tomentum on the underside:

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Like Colin, I made the trip up the Waimea Canyon road to Koke'e near the Napali Coast of Kaua'i. P. minors are used for landscaping around the parking lots at overlooks along the road and around the small settlement at Koke'e. None were very large but many were producing fruit. These were my seed sources. One tree at Koke'e is shown here:

minor_Kokee_Kauai_3.JPG.d433340358fff240

Another loulu from this area is P. napaliensis. Here is one of my four planted out in November 2012, ATV in back provides scale:

napaliensis_1_MLM_091717.thumb.JPG.ae955

The leaves are generally flat, though one of mine shows some leaf folding. Fruits are small, and there always seem to be some ripe ones, a rarity in Pritchardias. My seed sources were the Hilo Arboretum and the Limahuli Gardens on the north coast of Kaua'i.

The Limahuli Gardens featured a small, quite attractive loulu with flat or slightly cup-shaped leaves with white tomentum on the undersides, labeled P. limahuliensis. However, Hodel states that these are correctly referred to as P. perlmannii. One of the cultivated trees provided seeds that grew into one of my plants:

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Of the four I planted out in Aug 2012, this is the only one of the three that remain that has shown appreciable growth (8 x 8 x 16 inch blocks provide scale). The next photo shows the whitish tomentum:

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Enough for now.

 

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Mike Merritt

Big Island of Hawaii, windward, rainy side, 740 feet (225 meters) elevation

165 inches (4,200 mm) of rain per year, 66 to 83 deg F (20 to 28 deg C) in summer, 62 to 80 deg F (16.7 to 26.7 Deg C) in winter.

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Those are nice Mike, looks like you have a nice Pritchardia collection.

Interesting that your P. martii has rust colored lepida on the abaxial side of the leaves. All of my P. martii are silvery white as well as the ones I saw in habitat.  

Tim

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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Tim and Mike, and everyone, here are some habitat photos of P. marti on the north shore, right by the kahukuensis area, Laie area behind BYU Hawaii. The summit area is loaded with them. 

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Here are a couple of shots of what I'm using my best guess to be P. marti, at Queens Hospital, Oahu. a very old palm. Ive read that many species were brought in back in the 

day for landscaping in the downtown areas.

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Thanks Tim and Colin for your encouragement. Also Kim. I'm astonished that I left out an important loulu in my Kaua'i post above. It is P. waialealeana, 5-gal orange bucket for scale:

waialealeana_3_MLM_091817.thumb.JPG.11da

This was tiny when I planted it out in February 2012. The long, narrow seeds were given to me by the proprietor of Floribunda who informed of the probable, but not certain, identity. Only one germinated. The appearance is consistent with all other images that I have seen of this species.

 

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Mike Merritt

Big Island of Hawaii, windward, rainy side, 740 feet (225 meters) elevation

165 inches (4,200 mm) of rain per year, 66 to 83 deg F (20 to 28 deg C) in summer, 62 to 80 deg F (16.7 to 26.7 Deg C) in winter.

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  • 3 months later...

Thought I'd add one more to the mix. It was purchased as Aylmer-robinsonii, which is likely a synonym for remota. A very undulating leaf blade, & also has quite an upright growth habit. It's been a moderately fast grower as well. 

Bret

 

Coastal canyon area of San Diego

 

"In the shadow of the Cross"

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Pritchardias in Florida:

P. hillebrandii (Montgomery)

IMG_0411.thumb.jpg.29658e83cec6b2ee5ecb7

P. glabrata (Montgomery)

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P. pacifica (Montgomery)

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P. remota (Montgomery: 

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P. remota juvenile (Montgomery):

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P. remota (Fairchild)

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Pritchardia sp. (Fairchild)

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P. martii (Fairchild):

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P. thurstonii (Fairchild)

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Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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Here's a group of Pritchardias in Vero Beach. They seem to be P. pacifica, but survived the 2010 freezes with less damage than the nearby coconuts. 

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Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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Great pics Zeeth. Amazing how variable this genus looks depending on location. 

Bret

 

Coastal canyon area of San Diego

 

"In the shadow of the Cross"

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Pritchardia hillebrandi. Location Kuliouou valley, Oahu. Pretty darn blue, if not whitish.

aloha

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Thanks for the photos Keith, Bret, and Colin.........nice stuff, especially the P. remota and P. hillebrandii.

Tim

 

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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Colin,

 

Great pictures of maideniana. The leaves have a very collapsed look to them (exactly like the pictures in Hodel's book). Almost like they're dried out. I've got a palm purchased as maideniana growing in shade which is very pretty, but doesn't look anything like those. I'm suspecting another ID mix up. :(

Bret

 

Coastal canyon area of San Diego

 

"In the shadow of the Cross"

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On 9/15/2017, 8:43:52, Matt in OC said:

The first is what I purchased as Minor. It looks very distinct, even while young, with a sort of deep green, flat, non glossy leaf on top and gold underneath.

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The brown on the petiole here in your Pritchardia minor is similar to what I'm seeing on a still very young and small palm I acquired labeled as Pritchardia flynii.  I liked the look whatever it may turn out to be.  I got it in a 2 gallon pot in March of 2016 and planted it shortly thereafter.  I'm enjoying watching it grow and change.

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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1 hour ago, Tracy said:

The brown on the petiole here in your Pritchardia minor is similar to what I'm seeing on a still very young and small palm I acquired labeled as Pritchardia flynii.  I liked the look whatever it may turn out to be.  I got it in a 2 gallon pot in March of 2016 and planted it shortly thereafter.  I'm enjoying watching it grow and change.

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Mine is not fast but oh so gorgeous even when small. It’s one of my favorites! 

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  • 5 months later...
On 9/16/2017, 5:11:25, Zeeth said:

P. beccariana. This is my favorite Hawaiian species and it seems to do very well here under the right conditions.

IMG_0332.thumb.JPG.b84643c86db0e59352ab0

The P. beccariana got a bit damaged during our freezing winter, but it's growing back very nicely. I'm planning on donating this to the Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum by next spring so more people can enjoy it than just me.

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Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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  • 5 weeks later...

Spectacular photos! I can only so far provide photos of my germinated Pr. pacifica seedlings and Pr. munroi. As far as I see P. munroi have drooping fronds as adult and are not as attarctive as other Pritchardias. I also have a small Pr. thurstonii in a pot that grows very slowly. None in the ground yet. It is very expensive here (Azores) to bust through solid rock, then buy planting soil and make your own mix the best you can. After planting one tree that way one can become financialy and physically devastated. One large truck of soil about $220 and about a week of rock busting. If you hire an excavator with a pneumatic hammer, it's about $50 to $120 an hour.

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Edited by SoulofthePlace
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Average day temperatures: +17°C in the winter and +24°C in the summer. Typical Summer: 66F to 77F (19C to 25C). Typical Winter: 50F to 64F (10C to 18C). Record Low (past 5 years): 45F or +7.7C (once a winter, some winters). Record High (past 5 years): 80F or +27C (some days only). Elevation 140 m (459 ft.), latitude 38.54º. Sunset Zone: unknown

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Boy, hats off to you in an effort to establish a palm collection. Depending on where one lives on our island, getting a decent spot to dig a hole can be a challenge. 

Good Luck!

Tim 

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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  • 4 months later...
On 6/30/2018, 10:31:57, Zeeth said:

The P. beccariana got a bit damaged during our freezing winter, but it's growing back very nicely. I'm planning on donating this to the Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum by next spring so more people can enjoy it than just me.

MVIMG_20180629_202817.thumb.jpg.358df605

Donated the P. beccariana to Kopsick! It should make a nice specimen in their garden.

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Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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  • 8 months later...
On 12/2/2018 at 2:26 PM, Zeeth said:

Donated the P. beccariana to Kopsick! It should make a nice specimen in their garden.

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Update on this palm. It's doing quite well! 

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Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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  • 5 months later...

Wow! How did I miss this thread?! Amazing pictures of beautifully grown loulu, everyone!

Tim, how's your beccariana doing today? After seeing them off Stainback Highway some months ago, I've since become a HUGE fan (pun not intended)!

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Any pics of Pritchardia lowreyana out there?

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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