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Who Grows Washingtonia In Pots?


PalmTreeDude

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Does anyone grow Washingtonia in pots? If so, do they ever get to big (especially W. robusta)? I am wondering how these palms do in pots, I know a lot are sold in pots, but grown in pots for long periods of time? 

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PalmTreeDude

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2 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Does anyone grow Washingtonia in pots? If so, do they ever get to big (especially W. robusta)? I am wondering how these palms do in pots, I know a lot are sold in pots, but grown in pots for long periods of time? 

I germinated several W. Robusta seeds this past February and in just 8 months I have one that's growing very well in a 3-gallon pot. I might plant it outside next spring but it would be interesting to see how large it could get if I kept it in a pot.

 

 

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I recently bought a washingtonia robusta and just re-potted it today actually. It had some slight damage during shipping, but I plan to keep mine potted indefinably. I got it for $9.50. I actually grow mine and some others under a large grow light panel. Right now I'm just keeping some of the fronds that were folded from the box propped up temporarily with some light cotton string. Most of it is not necessary, but the bends are starting to straighten out already in just a few days. I made a splint with part of a chop stick and some cotton string too that'll stay on for a while though. I'm unsure if that frond will survive, but it's currently not looking too bad at all. 

growing mexican palm.jpg

growing mexican palm splint.jpg

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This is my W.robusta. I live in Finland. At summer he is in my balcony and winter, I`m bring it indoor in my livingroom with extra ligth. Now he is keep growing.

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23 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

Who? Me since 1972:

580ba7853bb1b_Washingtonia74N07-0306.thu

580ba78a48a43_Washingtonia1989-09-07.thu

580ba7916a06a_Washingtonia2012-07-06IMG_

 

How long did it take your Washingtonia in the last picture to get that big? They look really good by the way!

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PalmTreeDude

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21 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

How long did it take your Washingtonia in the last picture to get that big? They look really good by the way!

Ca. 30 years (*1980 & *1982). — My first Washi I have grown from seed in 1971 (not 1972).

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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1 hour ago, Pal Meir said:

Ca. 30 years (*1980 & *1982). — My first Washi I have grown from seed in 1971 (not 1972).

Awesome! I know if you put them in the ground it will take them around 15 years, who knows, maybe even shorter, or longer, to get that big. I know someone who planted one that had a 1 foot trunk on it in the ground at Hilton Head Island, S.C. and 9 years later it has a 8 foot trunk. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude

PalmTreeDude

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On 24 October 2016 at 5:25:53 AM, PalmTreeDude said:

Awesome! I know if you put them in the ground it will take them around 15 years, who knows, maybe even shorter, or longer, to get that big. I know someone who planted one that had a 1 foot trunk on it in the ground at Hilton Head Island, S.C. and 9 years later it has a 8 foot trunk. 

Mine in pot , bought it under'" American catton palm", it will stay in pot forever most likely ...

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8 hours ago, Mohsen said:

Mine in pot , bought it under'" American catton palm", it will stay in pot forever most likely ...

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Looks nice!

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PalmTreeDude

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/23/2016, 11:25:53, PalmTreeDude said:

Awesome! I know if you put them in the ground it will take them around 15 years, who knows, maybe even shorter, or longer, to get that big. I know someone who planted one that had a 1 foot trunk on it in the ground at Hilton Head Island, S.C. and 9 years later it has a 8 foot trunk. 

In the ground they are very, very fast. We have seedlings pop all the time. We let one grow from about 2005 through just last year when we cut it down. In that time (roughly 10 years), it was well above 20 feet tall and 15' of that was trunk. 

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I have posted pictures of my robusta growth in the past. It went from seed in 2008 to 15'+ trunk currently.  

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4 hours ago, Jdiaz31089 said:

In the ground they are very, very fast. We have seedlings pop all the time. We let one grow from about 2005 through just last year when we cut it down. In that time (roughly 10 years), it was well above 20 feet tall and 15' of that was trunk. 

 

19 minutes ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

I have posted pictures of my robusta growth in the past. It went from seed in 2008 to 15'+ trunk currently.  

Very very very very speedy! It would be a good palm if you felt like filling a some property with a palm forest, just throw a bunch of seed around! But, that might turn into a disaster... 

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PalmTreeDude

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  • 1 month later...

Hello guys! Forgive me my clumsy English! But there is very interesting, and I would like to share my experience and photos!
So look my palm. In the photo № 1,2- Washingtonia robusta, it is 3 years old. In the photo № 3,4- Washingtonia filifera. They have 2 years old. I plan to grow it only in the pots. All summer they are on the outdoor, under the open sun. In the winter in an unheated room. Average temperature + 10C. Under artificial lighting.
And lot of seedlings!)))
 

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I have had mine in a pot for around 18 months now, it was tiny and it has grown so fast, it has not been protected. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to keep the fronds green during winter?

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

I have four of the same size Washingtonia robusta. They are around 15 years old. I also have about 30 smaller ones.

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here are my three on the right.  Fortunei on the left.  all these are getting planted in the ground at my new house in a month or so.  Ill will wrap them

for winter.  Washy will be 2 years old from seed this june

 

mike

 

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Edited by mksmth
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  • 4 months later...

I do, but then I'm not quite sure whether it is filifera. Base of the "trunk" has brownish tint typical for Robusta. Would that be a Filibusta ?

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I have so many I started from seed I don't know what to do with them. 

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Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 14/8/2017 10:32:51, Ilovepalm said:

What is this wite stones in the pot?

Just quartz coarse sand.

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08053.gif

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7 hours ago, Sanips said:

Just quartz coarse sand.

How you see, when the ground is already dry under the stones?

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14 hours ago, Ilovepalm said:

How you see, when the ground is already dry under the stones?

I checked the soil from the drain holes

08053.gif

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  • 2 months later...

I've grown my large Washingtonia Robusta (on the right) since I got it as a tiny blade of grass seedling in August 2015. 

My smaller Robusta (on the left) I've grown from seed since July 2016. Up until July of this year (2017) when I moved out into my own apartment, I had put them outdoors from May-September. Every morning after sunrise I brought them outside in the front yard, and indoors after sunset. During winter I overwintered them in a southwest facing bay window and they survived on whatever sunlight came through that window. 

Since July of this year they've lived solely in apartment. Right after moving in, the first thing I did was built a grow lamp setup specifically for them, and whatever other plants I can fit around them. My Washies only grow from my grow lamps now (since July 2017), and I keep the lamps running from 4am-6pm (14 hours per day) on a programmed digital timer. I check on them every morning, water them as needed from roots, clean them up if needed, rotate them if needed, and I keep my apartment temp 68F-75F during Fall/Winter & 73F-78F during Spring/Summer. I fertilize them kind of sporadically (never more than once a month), but I try to keep to a 90 day routine. When I do fertilize them I use only but a small pinch of Jobe's Organics (4-2-2 granular fertilizer). Then I water a little bit right after from the top of the soil.  

They have seemed to thrive and look healthy. I really love them. They're my favorite palm. I have others in my collection but, Washies are my favorite. I intend the keep these potted for the long-term. I'm moving to Florida This next summer (2018), so in the future sometime out I might plant one or both eventually. But, I really don't want to. I see no reason why I should have to. If provided for in the correct conditions they will keep thriving. The large Washingtonia is in a 3gal container and the smaller one is in a 1gal container. 

 

 

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Richard Berry 

Toledo, Ohio. Zone 6b, along the Western Shores of Lake Erie. I'm a big Potted Palm enthusiast. I love the Washingtonia Robusta: its Resilient, Adaptable, and grows so rapidly. You can't keep it down; The Skyscraper Palm!  

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Richard Berry 

Toledo, Ohio. Zone 6b, along the Western Shores of Lake Erie. I'm a big Potted Palm enthusiast. I love the Washingtonia Robusta: its Resilient, Adaptable, and grows so rapidly. You can't keep it down; The Skyscraper Palm!  

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20171026_151158_HDR.jpg

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Richard Berry 

Toledo, Ohio. Zone 6b, along the Western Shores of Lake Erie. I'm a big Potted Palm enthusiast. I love the Washingtonia Robusta: its Resilient, Adaptable, and grows so rapidly. You can't keep it down; The Skyscraper Palm!  

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On 10/22/2016, 9:22:52, nitsua0895 said:

I germinated several W. Robusta seeds this past February and in just 8 months I have one that's growing very well in a 3-gallon pot. I might plant it outside next spring but it would be interesting to see how large it could get if I kept it in a pot.

 

 

IMG_2447.JPG

Nice robusta or hybrid there!

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Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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On 12/12/2016, 11:09:10, benko said:

I have had mine in a pot for around 18 months now, it was tiny and it has grown so fast, it has not been protected. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to keep the fronds green during winter?

 

 

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They look like pure Aryan filifera!

They get fat; maybe put in separate pots, but they're tough, and don't mind company.

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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On 10/29/2017, 9:28:53, RobustaEnvirons said:

I've grown my large Washingtonia Robusta (on the right) since I got it as a tiny blade of grass seedling in August 2015. 

My smaller Robusta (on the left) I've grown from seed since July 2016. Up until July of this year (2017) when I moved out into my own apartment, I had put them outdoors from May-September. Every morning after sunrise I brought them outside in the front yard, and indoors after sunset. During winter I overwintered them in a southwest facing bay window and they survived on whatever sunlight came through that window. 

Since July of this year they've lived solely in apartment. Right after moving in, the first thing I did was built a grow lamp setup specifically for them, and whatever other plants I can fit around them. My Washies only grow from my grow lamps now (since July 2017), and I keep the lamps running from 4am-6pm (14 hours per day) on a programmed digital timer. I check on them every morning, water them as needed from roots, clean them up if needed, rotate them if needed, and I keep my apartment temp 68F-75F during Fall/Winter & 73F-78F during Spring/Summer. I fertilize them kind of sporadically (never more than once a month), but I try to keep to a 90 day routine. When I do fertilize them I use only but a small pinch of Jobe's Organics (4-2-2 granular fertilizer). Then I water a little bit right after from the top of the soil.  

They have seemed to thrive and look healthy. I really love them. They're my favorite palm. I have others in my collection but, Washies are my favorite. I intend the keep these potted for the long-term. I'm moving to Florida This next summer (2018), so in the future sometime out I might plant one or both eventually. But, I really don't want to. I see no reason why I should have to. If provided for in the correct conditions they will keep thriving. The large Washingtonia is in a 3gal container and the smaller one is in a 1gal container. 

 

 

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Very nice!   Congrats on the new place. I have considered growing one in a container. I know there are some Rooftop bars here that have some fairly tall ones (10-12 feet of trunk) in large tubs.  My place has tons of outdoor space, but no ground to plant anything in. 4 outdoor patios, all are big, and the front patio is enormous.  I have plenty of space to fill!  You would probably like it here as Washingtonia Robusta are literally everywhere. Almost weeds in some places. They do fantastic here. 

 What part of FL are you moving to?   I FINALLY made the move after visiting here fairly often since 1990, to St. Petersburg, FL.   Zone 10A so loads of great stuff that we can grow here.  Great city, and its substantially less expensive many of Florida's other major cities. Love it!   Keep us posted!

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My Washington has not been growing for almost 2 years, but it does not rot. :( 

SAM_1303.JPG

Edited by Ilovepalm
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2 hours ago, Ilovepalm said:

My Washington has not been growing for almost 2 years, but it does not rot. :( 

SAM_1303.JPG

It could be too large a pot for such a small seedling, increase their light exposure, increase their heat exposure, and water less often. 

I would have each one of those in their own 1gal container. Pot then up in a mix of fast draining soil that has Perlite & sand. Put them in a very sunny place where they can bask in the sun. They love sun and heat all the time, and can survive on little water. Although, pots dry out fast in hot environments. I have mine under sun lamps and they are rapidly growing. Once they establish roots that reach the bottom of their containers, they thrive from water from the watering tray only. That's how I water mine, from the tray, not the soil. 

You should see improvement out of them if you do these things. 

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Richard Berry 

Toledo, Ohio. Zone 6b, along the Western Shores of Lake Erie. I'm a big Potted Palm enthusiast. I love the Washingtonia Robusta: its Resilient, Adaptable, and grows so rapidly. You can't keep it down; The Skyscraper Palm!  

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  • 1 month later...

My Washingtonia reach for the sky even though I grow them solely indoors. My sunlamp is programmed to run for them 14 hours a day, 4am-6pm. And I've got a large Hydrofarm growmat underneath them to provide bottom heat during winter months. I water them from the overflow watering tray only, every morning. They push new growth all year now. My sunlamps run every day no matter what mother nature decides to do, so my Washies always have a sunshine filled day. Here in Toledo Ohio, they do well indoors. 

Its all they've known since July 2017, when I moved into my apartment. I created a sort of rigging from 1/2inch PVP pipe, to suspend two Hydrofarm CFL growbulbs. I raise the lamps as the Washies grow to brush against the lamps. I cut a little longer piece of PVP pipe and raise them even higher. I don't raise them until they absolutely need it (half of the frond is in shadow of the lamps). This stimulates shorter petiole length and promotes a more compact shape as the palm won't grow the petioles as long and extend out the frond away from the lamps. As the light surface exposure decreases on the tallest frond, the palm reduces its growth of the petiole in question. Always the petioles will be longer than the last, but still shorter than if I would keep raising them right away after it reaches the lamps. It keeps the fronds closer to the lamps and promotes a more compact shape overall. 

Washingtonia can be a great indoor palm. Especially when you create an artificial climate like this. Who needs outdoors for their palms when you can make an artificial climate and grow indoors!      

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Richard Berry 

Toledo, Ohio. Zone 6b, along the Western Shores of Lake Erie. I'm a big Potted Palm enthusiast. I love the Washingtonia Robusta: its Resilient, Adaptable, and grows so rapidly. You can't keep it down; The Skyscraper Palm!  

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2 hours ago, RobustaEnvirons said:

My Washingtonia reach for the sky even though I grow them solely indoors. 

Wow, look at them now! Are any of them from the seeds I sent you?

I remember when you were just starting out... these look nice and healthy now and getting big. Be prepared as they will get much bigger! :D

With this kind of setup you can grow other more desirable species as well.

:greenthumb:

Edited by Pando
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 12/13/2017, 10:17:24, Pando said:

Wow, look at them now! Are any of them from the seeds I sent you?

I remember when you were just starting out... these look nice and healthy now and getting big. Be prepared as they will get much bigger! :D

With this kind of setup you can grow other more desirable species as well.

:greenthumb:

Hi Pando! Its great to hear from you. I have learned a lot over the last 2 years about palms and tropicals. I still love my Washingtonia Robusta though. Of the seed you gave me back in 2015 I think i grew about 5 total. I gave 1 to my aunt, 2 to my sister, 1 to my mom, and 1 I grew for myself. The Washy on the left (the smallest one) in my photos is one I grew from the seed I got from you. I kept that one for myself in my personal collection. The larger one is the Washy that I bought on eBay in 2015 and struggled to grow. If you remember...it had transport shock from being dug up from the seller's backyard in Nevada, mailed to my grandma's house in Toledo Ohio, and then potted up. That Washy was my first palm where I actually dove head first into the world of palms & exotics. Its of course thriving today (as shown in my pictures, as the right side palm). Its tallest and thrives so well under my sunlamp setup I constructed myself. 

The smaller one I grew from the seeds you gave me, I grew in July 2015. I tossed a washy seed in one of my grandma's old flower pots full of old soil.

Two weeks later it sprouted! I then potted it up in a Powerade bottle. After that I re-potted it in a 1gal standardised container, and finally only a few weeks ago I re-potted it again in a 3gal standardised container. I probably waited a little longer than I should've but I like to maximize the time they're in containers. 

Up until July 2017 I put both my Washies outdoors (every morning and back indoors after nightfall) during warm months of May-September. In the cold months I always placed them on my grandma's South-Southwest facing bay window. They maintained their foilage mostly a fall/winter in that bay window. It was a slow growth process in those days since that's all I had to work with.  

I've taken care of both my Washies by cleaning up their fronds, fertilizing them every once in a while, and etc. Now I live in my own apartment and it unfortunately has pour sunlight exposure. So to allow my Washingtonia to survive, I constructed a sunlamp environment just for them. I had to do this out of nessessicity for them. It was from there that I began learning and researching other palms and plants. To learn and understand as many species and varieties as I can has been my goal.

I know many kinds now and I've grown as a palm grower. I have a decent size collection now (around 26 specimens) and all the time I think about palms. I had to postpone my move to Florida until this coming July. But, when I move I plan on taking the majority of my plants with me.  

It was nice to see you make that post, and that you remembered me! I haven't been as active on PalmTalk as I used to be, but that's mostly because I haven't had problems. I have adapted and learned as I have gone along. :D

I am apart of many palm tree groups on Facebook and have over 25 palm tree friends on there. Additionally, much of what I know is from watching Banana Joe's YouTube channel (for the past couple years) in which he explains a lifetime of palm knowledge. 

One day its my life goal to work in a palm nursery (or perhaps own my own) one day when I move to Florida. One day in the future perhaps. You never know. My quest for palm knowledge and experience never ends.   

    

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Richard Berry 

Toledo, Ohio. Zone 6b, along the Western Shores of Lake Erie. I'm a big Potted Palm enthusiast. I love the Washingtonia Robusta: its Resilient, Adaptable, and grows so rapidly. You can't keep it down; The Skyscraper Palm!  

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Here is our Washy filifera which is around 8 years old..And it is growing in hot wet tropics.It was raised from the seeds.

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.

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love conquers all..

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10 hours ago, Kris said:

Here is our Washy filifera which is around 8 years old..And it is growing in hot wet tropics.It was raised from the seeds.

20171225_124702.thumb.jpg.700d3bf24fc224

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That looks really good! 

 

  • Upvote 1

Richard Berry 

Toledo, Ohio. Zone 6b, along the Western Shores of Lake Erie. I'm a big Potted Palm enthusiast. I love the Washingtonia Robusta: its Resilient, Adaptable, and grows so rapidly. You can't keep it down; The Skyscraper Palm!  

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