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jubaea x syagrus in the South


Tropicdoc

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Does anyone have Jubaea x Syagrus in the South. I wonder if growth rate or appearance is affected by the climate. We have probably all seen Gary Levine's monster palm of this type. What's yours look like?

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This is the next palm on my wish list. It can't be too much different than a Mule palm in hardiness, maybe a little less hardy at worst. But if it can breeze through Gainesville winters (I think it will) then maybe there's a chance for us zone 8 people. Anyone know anyone else that sells these hybrids besides Patric in California?

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Mines been fine for almost 5 years now. Will post an updated photo in a few weeks when I'm back where it is!

-Krishna

Kailua, Oahu HI. Near the beach but dry!

Still have a garden in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)

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Mine is growing very fast and looks super cool.

Good to hear that they do well even as far south as you! I have heard that they do alright in north Florida, but they usually have a better time with the cool growing species than central or south Florida.

Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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Doesn't Don over in Mississippi have one? ....it should be getting some size now.

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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Here is a photo of mine from Dec of this year, its around 5 years from receiving a small liner from Patric

AA47D12D-CE04-43B5-B851-78347FA21F79.jpg

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-Krishna

Kailua, Oahu HI. Near the beach but dry!

Still have a garden in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)

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This is the next palm on my wish list. It can't be too much different than a Mule palm in hardiness, maybe a little less hardy at worst. But if it can breeze through Gainesville winters (I think it will) then maybe there's a chance for us zone 8 people. Anyone know anyone else that sells these hybrids besides Patric in California?

They are definitely more hardy than mules, significantly so in my opinion. And they grow at cooler temperatures - mine pushes out growth just about all year round.

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Richard, that's encouraging to hear. I suppose when you think about it, Jubaeas are probably just as hardy if not a tad more hardy than Butias. So that makes sense that they're pretty cold hardy. Glad to know it works for you in the UK, would be a real eye catcher to the passerby. Unfotunately for me, everything is extreme down here- it can get 40 degrees Celsius in the summer one day and sometimes temperatures will dip to around -12 Celsius in the winter time. I guess I should buy one and see how it does! Once it gets some growth, that is...

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Interesting how it holds its leaflets on a flat plane like Jubaea. ...but you get much of the speed of a Queen. Nice growth and hybrid Krishna.

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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I have a younger one still in the pot with only two divided fronds so far.

I kept it in my basement beside a yatay x jubaea during the winter at around 10 degrees celsius (50 F).

To my surprise it has grown almost one inch on the emerging spear in the last three month at that temperature.

For comparison the y x j beside it hasn't moved at all.

Richard, how many new fronds do you get on your J x S in one season? And what were your lows so far?

Marcel

Edited by maesy
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Interesting how it holds its leaflets on a flat plane like Jubaea. ...but you get much of the speed of a Queen. Nice growth and hybrid Krishna.

Thanks! Its starting to speed up (I think).

The leaves are starting to have a few leaflets towards the base that are not in the flat plane (more like the queen x shape). Im hoping that either this is temporary or limited as if it spreads I may end up with a very ugly half plumose palm...

-Krishna

Kailua, Oahu HI. Near the beach but dry!

Still have a garden in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)

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I have a younger one still in the pot with only two divided fronds so far.

I kept it in my basement beside a yatay x jubaea during the winter at around 10 degrees celsius (50 F).

To my surprise it has grown almost one inch on the emerging spear in the last three month at that temperature.

For comparison the y x j beside it hasn't moved at all.

Richard, how many new fronds do you get on your J x S in one season? And what were your lows so far?

Marcel

Hi Marcel,

The lowest temperature mine has seen is only -5°C or so. So not cold. But it has sustained no damage at all at that temperature and is an early starter in spring.

regarding the growth rate, it is hard to give a definitive figure as it is only just beginning its third year in the ground, but i am very encouraged by its performance so far. Maybe 3/4 leaves per year in the first year and slightly more in the second year, and the base it thickening up nicely. It is certainly quicker than butiagrus.

This year will give me a good indication of growth rate in our climate i think.

Two things for sure though (1) it is a good one for our climate so far and (2) it is a very attractive palm.

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A jubaea was spontaneously pollinated by a syagrus??!! How did you know? Seed shape?

It came from Jubaea seeds and it's clearly not--I can't grow Jubaea in my climate(that's one hint). This palm is a rocket for me--very fast!

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Here is mine. Nature made this one, not a man's hands...

Are you sure that's not a Jubaea x Butia?

Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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Jubaea x Butia gets my vote as well. It looks quite different from my JxS around the same size. More re-curved, less upright.

10305609_10152380972732234_3800955627327

Ben Rogers

On the border of Concord & Clayton in the East Bay hills - Elev 387 ft 37.95 °N, 121.94 °W

My back yard weather station: http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/hdfForecast?query=37.954%2C-121.945&sp=KCACONCO37

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Jubaea x Butia gets my vote as well. It looks quite different from my JxS around the same size. More re-curved, less upright.

10305609_10152380972732234_3800955627327

I am not sure about anything other than it's from a Jubaea seed--my friend went back, after he noticed they were not pure Jubaea and said only queens were nearby... it has no thorns and is completely natural, as far as the hybridization is concerned.

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Here is my JxS. Pictured the day I received it from Patrick in June 2011 (the little guy on the left) and again from last October. It went into the ground in May of 2012, took off & hasn't looked back since! I will post an updated picture in the next couple of days.

post-4410-0-93411500-1425360970_thumb.jp

post-4410-0-45485500-1425360976_thumb.pn

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52% 9B / 42% 10A / 6% "Other"

Brandon.gif

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Here is my JxS. Pictured the day I received it from Patrick in June 2011 (the little guy on the left) and again from last October. It went into the ground in May of 2012, took off & hasn't looked back since! I will post an updated picture in the next couple of days.

attachicon.gifJxS 6-2011.jpg

attachicon.gifJxS 10-19-14.png

And here it is today.

post-4410-0-96866800-1425391064_thumb.jp

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52% 9B / 42% 10A / 6% "Other"

Brandon.gif

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4 years....not as fast as a Queen....not as slow as a Jubea

post-97-0-99451400-1425399719_thumb.png

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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My BxPJ, shown in the picture on the right (post # 26), has been much slower. It still has a descent size, but the JxS has outpaced it significantly since they went into the ground.

52% 9B / 42% 10A / 6% "Other"

Brandon.gif

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Which is interesting because Dick claimed that BxPJ was by far the fasted of his hybrids. Maybe something to do with California vs. Florida conditions. I got a little (JxB)xS ...it spear pulled this first winter in the ground but hopefully it will recover and be a bit faster than JxS....even though the Butia "blood" is no speed demon either, should be faster than a strait up Jubea "blood".

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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JxBxS has been quite fast for me, about the same as a mule palm. This was followed by JxS with BxP as the slowest in my experience.

-Krishna

Kailua, Oahu HI. Near the beach but dry!

Still have a garden in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)

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I have a BxJ that looks good and has grown a lot since I got it, but it DEFINATELY is the slowest of the three hybrids that I have. It seems to have grown to a certain size & then basically stopped.

And a correction. I went back in my records and it was the BxPJ that went into the ground in 5/12. I didn't plant the JxS until 9/12.

52% 9B / 42% 10A / 6% "Other"

Brandon.gif

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Which is interesting because Dick claimed that BxPJ was by far the fasted of his hybrids. Maybe something to do with California vs. Florida conditions. I got a little (JxB)xS ...it spear pulled this first winter in the ground but hopefully it will recover and be a bit faster than JxS....even though the Butia "blood" is no speed demon either, should be faster than a strait up Jubea "blood".

At Dick's place, not many palms are 'fast' but that particular hybrid would enjoy his conditions most, hence the speed of growth...

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Which is interesting because Dick claimed that BxPJ was by far the fasted of his hybrids. Maybe something to do with California vs. Florida conditions. I got a little (JxB)xS ...it spear pulled this first winter in the ground but hopefully it will recover and be a bit faster than JxS....even though the Butia "blood" is no speed demon either, should be faster than a strait up Jubea "blood".

At Dick's place, not many palms are 'fast' but that particular hybrid would enjoy his conditions most, hence the speed of growth...

What about the East Bay do you think is optimal for this combo?

Ben Rogers

On the border of Concord & Clayton in the East Bay hills - Elev 387 ft 37.95 °N, 121.94 °W

My back yard weather station: http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/hdfForecast?query=37.954%2C-121.945&sp=KCACONCO37

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I got a close up yesterday and I don't see anything that says 'Butia'--I have butia hybrids in the yard to compare to as well. I am thinking Daddy was Syagrus...

post-5491-0-97861900-1426082646_thumb.jp

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And this is about 6 months ago--this hopefully gives you guys an idea of the speed of this palm. I think that speaks to Syagrus papa as well...

Also, I have never trimmed this palm.

post-5491-0-68088400-1426083212_thumb.jp

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Yes...doesn't look like any Butia genetics there.

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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Don't know if it has a Butia parent or not, but looks different from my JxS & others I have seen. There's something different going on there...even if it's just hybrid variability.

Ben Rogers

On the border of Concord & Clayton in the East Bay hills - Elev 387 ft 37.95 °N, 121.94 °W

My back yard weather station: http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/hdfForecast?query=37.954%2C-121.945&sp=KCACONCO37

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  • 8 months later...

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