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Tired of Cocos?


Dypsisdean

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Occasionally, I go with a local family to one of the plush resorts on the Kona coast where some of them work, for a Sunday buffet. Unlike the other world class resorts here, the Kona Village is built in the old Hawaiian style, with single hales (bungalows) on the pristine coastline, or surrounding the many lagoons in the area. No phones, no TVs, no pavement, and no noise. However, there are lots of coco palms, and some beautiful old Hawaiian scenes. Here are a few to enjoy.

Registration

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Buffet Hale

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And the Grounds

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Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

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Dean,

That's a great place. It's been a while since we stayed there (excellent service and fabulous food!), but we tend to go over there for their Luau when we have guests from out-of-state (or out-of country). Probably one of the better ones. If not, let me know! :)

Bo-Göran

Leilani Estates, 25 mls/40 km south of Hilo, Big Island of Hawai'i. Elevation 880 ft/270 m. Average rainfall 140 inches/3550 mm

 

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Hey Dean, I never get tired of these! Cocos is the tropics. That is why all of us who can't grow them easily (or at all) try to grow them. I am thrilled that my two little seedlings from last year appear to have made it through this winter with only minimal damage. They will never, ever ever ever look as good as the cocos in Hawaii though  :;):

Parrish, FL

Zone 9B

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Bo,

I think that they may throw the best luau. The real kalua pig imu (cooked in an underground pit with hot lava rock) is really something. My son said it's the best meat he has ever eaten. Here's a shot of the stage you will recognize. The Polynesian performers are top notch.

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Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

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Dean,

You may be interested to know that it was after a luau at Kona Village Resort in the summer of 1997 that Karolyn said she wanted a rockwall JUST like they have there (in your post above). So I designed the rockwall that we have by our pavilion, and had our Tongan friend Kina, and his crew, build it in Aug 1997. Here's a photo.

Bo-Göran

post-22-1174278123_thumb.jpg

Leilani Estates, 25 mls/40 km south of Hilo, Big Island of Hawai'i. Elevation 880 ft/270 m. Average rainfall 140 inches/3550 mm

 

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Bo,

That is interesting. Small world, Big Island.

I just inserted another pic of the stage to better show the whole wall.

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Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

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As would be expected, there aren't enough around here for me to tire of them.  Gorgeous photos, thanks.

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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Stunningly beautiful.  Now I see why this resort charges the big bucks to stay there.  It's worth it for how they've planted it.

Dean, I'm curious as to what is the annual rainfall at that location.  I understand it to be on the lower side?  Did they need to irrigate at any point in time to get that all established?  Wasn't that all solid lavaflow before they built there?

 San Francisco Bay Area, California

Zone 10a

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what an amazing place!all the talk about brunch is making me hungry! :P

the "prince of snarkness."

 

still "warning-free."

 

san diego,california,left coast.

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Kathy,

Dean may have rainfall figures. I believe the average rainfall that close to the ocean on the Kona side is around 8 inches/per year.

ALL those expensive resorts on the Kona side were built on old lavaflows. Well, the entire island is made up of old lavaflows of course, but because of the very low rainfall there are 500 year old lavaflows on the Kona side that are still very exposed, with not much, if any, growth. Here on the Hilo side, a 100 year old lavaflow will be like a jungle. So, when Kona Village Resort (KVR), Hualalai Four Seasons, Hilton, Mauna Lani, etc etc., were built and designed they brought in thousands of truckloads of soil and basically created little islands (with plenty of vegetation) in the stark lava landscape. Even though with KVR, the sandy beach, and the sandy areas somewhat inland were probably there all along. I'm certain the old Hawaiians used those ponds for fishing. Dean may have more info.

Bo-Göran

Leilani Estates, 25 mls/40 km south of Hilo, Big Island of Hawai'i. Elevation 880 ft/270 m. Average rainfall 140 inches/3550 mm

 

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Kathy,

Bo is probably very close in his estimate of rainfall in that area. I am not sure about how much they do irrigate there. My guess is not too much since I haven't noticed the ground as wet, and I haven't noticed any sprinklers. Also, much of the foliage is native. The cocos, the Pritchardia, and natives like the keawe trees, can grow on their own. But I will have to check on that.

Even though the rainfall is minimal, there is a lot of ground water in the area. The "lagoons" you see are actually known as alchialine ponds. Anchialine ponds exist in inland lava depressions near the ocean.  They are fed by freshwater springs or from percolation from the water table. The water level rises and falls with the tide and salinity varies from fresh to saltier than sea water. So where ever you see naturally occuring coco palms along the coast, you can be assured there is some underground source of water. There is much underground flow of water on the whole island through the countless lava tubes that run down from the mountain. And don't forget, even though dry by precipitation standards, the air is still filled with humidity.

I am also not sure either how much filling and grading, etc that was done over the lava to get what you see today. Unlike some of the other resort locations, this was always a village from ancient times, and may have slowly adopted its "feel" without massive development. The recent 1801 lava flow is right there, and still has many nice petroglyphs carved into it.

Here is an interesting link from their page, with a short description of the history.

http://www.konavillage.com/kona_history.cfm

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Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

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I see Dean is making a bid for the 2007 best photo contest!  There's several in there that are worthy.   :)

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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yes,i agree there ARE,matt.

the one in #4 is my particular favorite.the reflection of the palms in the water is exquisite.

the "prince of snarkness."

 

still "warning-free."

 

san diego,california,left coast.

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You live in paradise! I can't imagine being within short driving distance of scenery like that.

I'm always up for learning new things!

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My first stay on the Island of Hawaii on the Kona side was back in 1969 right out of High school.  I had sold my 55 chev and used the money for a couple of foam blanks and finished the two boards at 2:00 am and left on the first flight that United had ever flew non stop to Hilo....There were only 6 people on that flight and had alot of fun with the flight attendents.  Almost join the mile high club on that one. lol.......I was picked up by a friend who's father owned to shops in Kona.  Anyway at that time there were no hotels at all...They were just starting the building of the first....I could tell you alot of stories about that trip but that can wait for another time.  Just wanted to say thanks for such a great photo spread it took me back in time a bit and I thank you.

Curt

Cypress, Ca.

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