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Planting palms together to create "multiples". I'm considering something creative


rprimbs

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I want to create some unusual "multiple" palms. Like a Archontophoenix purpurea, with a A. myolensis, and a A. maxima. Or a Chambeyronia macrocarpa, with a C. hookeri, and a C. species Houailou. Will this work? I don't think I've ever seen a multiple Chambeyronia.

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Let me see if I've got this right, you want to take trees, and bunch them together, and make them look like a bush? Ed

MOSQUITO LAGOON

Oak_Hill.gif

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Let me see if I've got this right, you want to take trees, and bunch them together, and make them look like a bush? Ed

Sort of... A different type of "bush". One with three trunks angling off in different directions -- and a little variation between each. Even a lot of variation! Like if I put a A. maxima in between an A. purpurea and and A. myolensis.

I was just wondering how much this might stunt the palm trees. And if certain types wouldn't grow well or take to this.

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Actually it works beautifully. The bases have become really fat, much more so than a solitary and

Chambeyronia having a somewhat sparse crown just looks so different. This was an

experiment when I acquired it as a 15 gal. double just to see how it would grow and I think it looks great.

It's a 'watermelon' variation.

post-1300-0-10542100-1346029912_thumb.jp

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Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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Here are a few that I have done in the past.

post-4755-0-56713800-1346034802_thumb.jp

phoenicophorium borsigianum 3 planted together

post-4755-0-08306200-1346034828_thumb.jp post-4755-0-50352300-1346034847_thumb.jp

dypsis madagascariensis 2 planted together

post-4755-0-05419400-1346034871_thumb.jp

dictyosperma album 2 together

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I did this with a Veitchia, foxtail and Carpentaria planted together. They're still growing so I'm not sure how it'll look but it should be interesting

Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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Go for it! Keep trying different stuff. I'm trying different species together; usually "high/ low" species. One double that comes to mind is Brahea brandigeei & Brahea decumbens. I think it will be a cool look.

Bret

 

Coastal canyon area of San Diego

 

"In the shadow of the Cross"

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Washingtonia, Syagrus, Brahea

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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Last year I planted 3 Christmas palms together, they look great that way......looks best when odd numbers are used such as 3 or 5.

Andrew,
Airlie Beach, Whitsundays

Tropical Queensland

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This actually has been done for several, several years now with very nice results. Using Archontophoenix , or Chambeyronia will look very nice, bit certainly can't see how it will look like a bush. I've see Bottles and Spindles that were actually beautiful when they got larger with trunk. With any multiple trunk plantings, you always run the risk of one palm getting left behind the other two and end up much shorter and very thin. Try to use equal palms in height. And as mentioned above, stick with odd numbers, except for doubles.

Searle Brothers Nursery Inc.

and The Rainforest Collection.

Southwest Ranches,Fl.

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I have several of these experiments going as well, a royal flanked by two V. arecina, then a Livistona chinensis surrounded buy 4 foxtails, and several other combos. They are still in pots and look like they will be real nice.

Jupiter FL

in the Zone formally known as 10A

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I saw some unpleasant combos yesterday of Washingtonia robustas with Trachycarpus fortunei tightly planted.

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Jason Dewees

Inner Sunset District

San Francisco, California

Sunset zone 17

USDA zone 10a

21 inches / 530mm annual rainfall, mostly October to April

Humidity averages 60 to 85 percent year-round.

Summer: 67F/55F | 19C/12C

Winter: 56F/44F | 13C/6C

40-year extremes: 96F/26F | 35.5C/-3.8C

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rp:

Are you looking for an odd combo, or are you using the varied types as a more effective screen?

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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rp:

Are you looking for an odd combo, or are you using the varied types as a more effective screen?

I'm looking for an odd combo. Like three types of Chambeyronia. Realarch's looks great!

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rp:

Are you looking for an odd combo, or are you using the varied types as a more effective screen?

I'm looking for an odd combo. Like three types of Chambeyronia. Realarch's looks great!

Well, you can sure have LOTS of fun with that. How about three kinds of Royals: regia, oleracea/princeps and borenqenia? Three different caryotas . . . etc.

Sounds cool, indeed.

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Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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I have done this as well. Try different species of similar looking palms. Ups you species list while looking great. I have done this with three large dypsis and in 20 years I'll tell you how they look..

With a tin cup for a chalice

Fill it up with good red wine,

And I'm-a chewin' on a honeysuckle vine.

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A popular combo is Royal+Alex+Soliatire, a bit boring though, I'd give the Chamby group a shot, but add Euterpe to two Chambys. I have been converted over the years to tight group planting.

Happy Gardening

Cheers,

Wal

Queensland, Australia.

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A popular combo is Royal+Alex+Soliatire, a bit boring though, I'd give the Chamby group a shot, but add Euterpe to two Chambys. I have been converted over the years to tight group planting.

Wal, I've got the Chamby group in the ground. Just three Chamby's -- hookeri, macrocarpa, and species houailou. I confess that that I don't know that much about palms and I'd never heard about Euterpe before. I did an internet search and saw pictures of Euterpe edulis "orange crownshaft", and I've got to get that palm!! I'd love to do a grouping of three of them!

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Just to add to the discussion, in my area, Queenpalms have been planted by the zillion. In the years since this fad has taken place, lots of them are now 25 to 30 feet tall.

The groupings of these palms, whic are solitary by nature, appears to weaken their root structure. When the big winds come through, and they do to the tune of 30-40 MPH and gusts even higher, the large crowns catch a significant amount of wind (which seems to come after heavy rains) and these group plantings take to the air.

OK, I exaggerate, but for the past 4 years in my neighborhood we have had Queen palm group planting failures as they get uprooted and fall. Thus far, no home have been destroyed but think it is just a matter of time.

I do not know what will happen with othe species or mixed species but it may be something to considered once the trees reach mature size and if there is the risk of high winds....like hurricanes or tornadoes, perhaps....

just a thought....

John Case

Brentwood CA

Owner and curator of Hana Keu Garden

USDA Zone 9b more or less, Sunset Zone 14 in winter 9 in summer

"Its always exciting the first time you save the world. Its a real thrill!"

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Just to add to the discussion, in my area, Queenpalms have been planted by the zillion. In the years since this fad has taken place, lots of them are now 25 to 30 feet tall.

The groupings of these palms, whic are solitary by nature, appears to weaken their root structure. When the big winds come through, and they do to the tune of 30-40 MPH and gusts even higher, the large crowns catch a significant amount of wind (which seems to come after heavy rains) and these group plantings take to the air.

OK, I exaggerate, but for the past 4 years in my neighborhood we have had Queen palm group planting failures as they get uprooted and fall. Thus far, no home have been destroyed but think it is just a matter of time.

I do not know what will happen with othe species or mixed species but it may be something to considered once the trees reach mature size and if there is the risk of high winds....like hurricanes or tornadoes, perhaps....

just a thought....

Thank you that is certainly something to consider. I've never seen Queen palms do that but perhaps it doesn't get as windy down here.

I'm growing my palms on a very sheltered northwest facing slope where they will get almost no wind. In fact my whole property is very sheltered and I've got a surprisingly good microclimate here. And I think that the decomposed granite here is good for a palm tree to anchor its roots into. If you saw my hillside you would think that it was solid granite but you can actually dig it with a shovel if you fill the hole with water first -- so the palms put their roots right down into it.

Here's one of the little groupings of palms that I planted. I confess that these were the last palms that I planted and unlike the other palms -- which I was more concerned about -- I was a little slow getting the shade cloth up and they got a little burnt from the sun. But they're looking better now than when I took this picture. It seems that things are growing like crazy in this heat.

post-4899-0-24656600-1347213703_thumb.jp

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  • 9 years later...

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