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The wonders of Hydrogen Peroxide


MattyB

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I've had excellent results treating crown rot in my palms using Hydrogen Peroxide. If I see some sort of problem, or even suspect that something is going on down there inside of the growing point, I'll pour Hydrogen Peroxide down there a couple times per week, for several weeks and 9 times out of 10 the palm pushes past the problem.

Here's an example of some recent success. This Attalea had the newest leaf suddenly brown off and die and the next small spear had stopped growing. This is not a good sign. So I've been treating it with Hydrogen Peroxide for a month or so and today I took a close look and saw that it's pushed past the rot.

In this picture my finger is on that last newest leaf that suddenly died. You can see that it's since pushed out the spot where it was rotting and now there's fresh green petiole down below.

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Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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In these pics my thumb is on that leaf that died, and my finger is on the spear. You can see that on the same spot on the spear there was rot as well and it's pushed that out and now fresh green spear is emerging. I just love this stuff! It's cheap, effective, safe, and easy to use.

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Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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Can pouring peroxide into a healthy crown hurt a palm? At what point do you stop pouring the peroxide down there? Do you make a diluted solution?

Grant
Long Beach, CA

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I use whatever the stuff is that you buy at the store which I think is 3%, straight out of the bottle, no dilution. I don't think you can hurt anything with it. Heck, I use it as mouthwash.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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At the first sign of any spear or crown problem, I pour peroxide into the crown two or three times. I'm a true believer, every one has pulled through. This is great stuff.

Castor oil for palms.

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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There is high strength hydrogen peroxide available in 29% and 35% concentrations. Have to dilute these down or they can burn tissue. More economical but be careful. Very light amounts helps control damping off with seedlings and cuttings. 1 tsp(29% grade) for 5 gallon bucket of water. Peroxide, sulfur, copper, and neem oil are allowed under organic practices, and are only fungicides I use. No need for nasty chemicals.

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I'd be scared of hurting myself with the strong stuff but I can see where it would be useful for a large scale grower. The regular 3% stuff that I buy at any store is like 80 cents for a quart, so it's very affordable, especially the ones with the little flip top squirter hole so you don't have to pour so much out, you can just squirt a little squirt in there am I still talking? Why does my voice sound wierd? Wierd wierd wierd wierd weird weird when you say it so many times it stops sounding like a word werid word

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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I used the 10% H2O2 solution ,commonly sold in drugstores here, for several times in palms with spearpull and had also succes several times, but I always covered the gaping hole from where the spear was removed, not letting rain water enter it.

Carambeí, 2nd tableland of the State Paraná , south Brazil.

Alt:1030m. Native palms: Queen, B. eriospatha, B. microspadix, Allagoptera leucocalyx , A.campestris, Geonoma schottiana, Trithrinax acanthocoma. Subtr. climate, some frosty nights. No dry season. August: driest month. Rain:1700mm

 

I am seeking for cold hardy palms!

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I have success with this sometimes I think part 2 of the success is some HEAT. Which i lack quite a bit.

Zone 10a at best after 2007 AND 2013, on SW facing hill, 1 1/2 miles from coast in Oceanside, CA. 30-98 degrees, and 45-80deg. about 95% of the time.

"The great workman of nature is time."   ,  "Genius is nothing but a great aptitude for patience."

-George-Louis Leclerc de Buffon-

I do some experiments and learning in my garden with palms so you don't have to experience the pain! Look at my old threads to find various observations and tips!

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The late John Bishock told me about using hydrogen peroxide (12 years ago, when I first started buying palms from him) for bud rot caused by cold damage, in lieu of copper sulphate.

Palms that had a bacterial infection would cause the hydrogen peroxide to bubble up when I applied it.

I can't state one way or the other the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide. The same can be said for copper sulphate. Some palms recovered, some didn't, but other factors (size of palm, location of palm, etc.) might be the cause of this. That being said, I would definitely treat a palm with hydrogen peroxide than do nothing at all.

Mad about palms

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MattyB - I wondered what kept your hair so blond ... :lol: You must treat you palms often. :o

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Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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I use whatever the stuff is that you buy at the store which I think is 3%, straight out of the bottle, no dilution. I don't think you can hurt anything with it. Heck, I use it as mouthwash.

don't forget to mention you also use it as "hair-dye"

Living in the valley of the dirt people in the inland empire, "A mullet on every head and a methlab in every kitchen." If you can't afford to live in the tropics, then bring the tropics to you!

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Heck Eric, you should know thats my natural color.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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Thanks Matty B,

It's indeed a cheap, easy to find product which is safe to handle and which won't kill the beneficial fungi I gave to my palm roots.

Much obliged.

Don't worry, Matty B, no one will repeat you're a fake blond...

Sebastian, garden on La Palma island, 370 m (1200 feet) above sea level / USDA Zone 11/12 ; Heat zone IV / V

Record High: 42°C (107F) / Record Low: 9°C (48°F). Rain: 600 mm (24 inches) per year with dry/wet seasons. Warm Season: July-November / Cool Season: December-June
Warmest month (August/September) average minimum temperature : 21°C (70°F) / Warmest month (August/September) average maximum temperature : 28°C (82°F)
Coldest month (February/March) average minimum temperature : 14,5°C (58°F) / Coldest month (February/March) average maximum temperature : 21°C (70°F)

Temperature of the sea : minimum of 20°C (68°F) in march, maximum of 25°C (77°F) in September/October.


 

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:huh:

Heck Eric, you should know thats my natural color.

Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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So this may be a dumb question, but I'm guessing if you're having to pour peroxide on your palms, you probably already have a problem. Are there certain palms that pouring liquid in the crown would cause more harm than good? I know that certain palms are prone to rot from overhead watering, so would the same apply for overhead peroxiding? (nice word, right?) Say for instance, in a Ravenea?

Grant
Long Beach, CA

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From what I understand, once the peroxide does it's thang, you're left with water. So if you're pouring it downt the crown, you're right, you're essentially watering into the crown. I don't think that an occasional preventative H3O-ing on a problamatic palm is gonna hurt anything, but if you're doing it every few days you might run into a problem with moisture down there. But wait, it's H3O and kills the rot so I don't know man! Hope that helps. hahahaha

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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Hi Matty,

I have a Dypsis decipiens that has a kind of "open collar" and the newest spear is small, brown-tipped and curved. I will try the Hydrogen Peroxide thing, but I also have in my shed Daconil and CopperSol. Is the Hydro' better than those 2 bigger guns with these issues?

Edited by osideterry

Zone 9b/10a, Sunset Zone 22

7 miles inland. Elevation 120ft (37m)

Average annual low temp: 30F (-1C)

Average annual rainfall: 8" (20cm)

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From what I understand, once the peroxide does it's thang, you're left with water. So if you're pouring it downt the crown, you're right, you're essentially watering into the crown. I don't think that an occasional preventative H3O-ing on a problamatic palm is gonna hurt anything, but if you're doing it every few days you might run into a problem with moisture down there. But wait, it's H3O and kills the rot so I don't know man! Hope that helps. hahahaha

Also dries out the hair making it brittle and gives you split ends with continued useage. :huh:

Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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I used this three times on my rotten butia and it's already growing new leaves within a week.

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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Hi Matty,

I have a Dypsis decipiens that has a kind of "open collar" and the newest spear is small, brown-tipped and curved. I will try the Hydrogen Peroxide thing, but I also have in my shed Daconil and CopperSol. Is the Hydro' better than those 2 bigger guns with these issues?

I'm not sure Terry. I only use Daconil (chlorothalonil) as a topical spray for leaf fungus, and rarely at that. I've never used copper.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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From what I understand, once the peroxide does it's thang, you're left with water. So if you're pouring it downt the crown, you're right, you're essentially watering into the crown. I don't think that an occasional preventative H3O-ing on a problamatic palm is gonna hurt anything, but if you're doing it every few days you might run into a problem with moisture down there. But wait, it's H3O and kills the rot so I don't know man! Hope that helps. hahahaha

H3O would definitely hurt your palms and also get you on the Homeland security list--H3O is heavy water(Dean can fill you in if you are unfamiliar with it). Hydrogen peroxide is H2O2 not H3O BIG DIFFERENCE! Take a chemistry class and you will understand :)

Edited by Mandrew968
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This is awesome, thanks for the heads up. I hate using Daconil, just don't trust the chemicals drying up and floating around my yard to inhale, much less having to use the stuff in the first place.

...h p eventually becomes just water? How awesome is that?!

Glenn

Modesto, California

 

Sunset Zone 14   USDA 9b

 

Low Temp. 19F/-7C 12-20-1990         

 

High Temp. 111F/43C 07-23-2006

 

Annual Average Precipitation 13.12 inches/yr.

 

             

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Yeah, H2O2, my bad. It reacts, releasing the extra O, hence the bubbles, and you're left with H20, that's water. You might wanna take a chemistry class so you understand.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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Yeah, H2O2, my bad. It reacts, releasing the extra O, hence the bubbles, and you're left with H20, that's water. You might wanna take a chemistry class so you understand.

It reacts

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My link

Yes, but it's been a while since I've taken Chemistry.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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  • 1 month later...

Thanks again Matty, this is great. It's inexpensive, safe and effective! :)

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Glenn

Modesto, California

 

Sunset Zone 14   USDA 9b

 

Low Temp. 19F/-7C 12-20-1990         

 

High Temp. 111F/43C 07-23-2006

 

Annual Average Precipitation 13.12 inches/yr.

 

             

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From what I understand, once the peroxide does it's thang, you're left with water. So if you're pouring it downt the crown, you're right, you're essentially watering into the crown. I don't think that an occasional preventative H3O-ing on a problamatic palm is gonna hurt anything, but if you're doing it every few days you might run into a problem with moisture down there. But wait, it's H3O and kills the rot so I don't know man! Hope that helps. hahahaha

H3O would definitely hurt your palms and also get you on the Homeland security list--H3O is heavy water(Dean can fill you in if you are unfamiliar with it). Hydrogen peroxide is H2O2 not H3O BIG DIFFERENCE! Take a chemistry class and you will understand :)

I don't think you can get the combination H30 as a complete molecule. Heavy water is H2O. The only difference being within the nucleus of the H atom. In heavy water the H atom contains an extra neutron making the atom heavier than normal. So heavy water is just that, much heavier than normal water, and absorbs (neutralises) radiation. Because it's heavier on an atomic level it does react a bit differently than normal water and can kill organisms. It does naturally occur in extremely minute amounts in water, not sufficient to cause problems.

Peroxide is unstable with the extra O atom. This gets released in the presence of organic matter 'burning' it (for want of a better term). For micro-pathogens that is fatal. Once the extra O atom is released the remainder is back to being plain H2O.

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Hydrogen Peroxide ( Food Grade 33%) saved our large rotting Copernicia baily, the new spears were rotten last "wet winter" i poured a 10 litre bucket of "Rainwater" with the right amount of 33% HP every 2nd day for 3 days .Its quickly gained health..We mix hydrogen peroxide with our seaweed ferts now. Huge broadacre grain crops in Canada and also my familys Wheat growing farm(12,000 acres spray 33% hyddrogen peroxide to grain crops when they are green to help prevent rust and moulds attacking the crops. Hydrogen peroxide is also known to make fruit and vegetables produce a much higher yield."Chemical companies" dont want people to know of "The Fantastic Benefits Of HP", so dont believe ant rubbish they write about HP harming or not helping plants. When you buy HP make sure you buy the 33% foodgrade. Go searching on the net about HP and "read and beleive the Truths"..Good on you Matty for starting this thread to help spread the word. Pete

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  • 4 weeks later...

Have we reached a conclusion about the solution of HP to be used? I' ve just bought a 30% solution and in the backlabel there is a warning that the product is harmfull if swallowed and causes serious eye damage. Should I dilute it or apply it as it is?

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Have we reached a conclusion about the solution of HP to be used? I' ve just bought a 30% solution and in the backlabel there is a warning that the product is harmfull if swallowed and causes serious eye damage. Should I dilute it or apply it as it is?

30 % will severely burn your skin, Please read online on a good site on how much to use before you use , I only put 3 tablespoons to 10litres of rainwater..30% is very powerful and dont spill it on your skin. We keep ours in the fridge and keep it "well away from children"...If you use 30% direct on plants its will burn and kill them...It MUST be diluted and no more than 3 tablespoons to 10 litres ..Also , make sure the water is rainwater Not chlorinated tap water. Google 35%Foodgrade Hydrogen peroxide, read and learn..We use 35% not 33% as I wrote on my last post.
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  • 10 months later...

Pete, what shops in Australia stock the food grade hydrogen peroxide?

I know the hydroponic shops stock it, is this what I am looking for to treat a minor (at this stage) trunk infection?

Thanks, Peter

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Pete, what shops in Australia stock the food grade hydrogen peroxide?

I know the hydroponic shops stock it, is this what I am looking for to treat a minor (at this stage) trunk infection?

Thanks, Peter

Peter, your nearest Pharmacy will have 35% Food grade HP but not on the shelves, ask and will wander to the back and get what you ask for. Make sure you read up about the amount of mm to add to a Ltr of Rainwater and store your HP in the dark out of light. Pete :)

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PK , I dilute to 5% and get plenty of fizz without burn. When using on delicate seedlings I go for half that strength.

cheers

R.

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