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Chamaedorea elegans


Zeeth

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I just bought a Chamaedorea elegans for $1 at the store, i figured I'd give it a try for that price. What's some info about this? How well do these do inside, and do they do any better as individual plants rather than bunched up like it came? Thanks,

Keith

Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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They make great indoor palms as well as outdoor palms, shady to partial shade, also chamadorea costaricana is slightly thicker stalk that resembles bamboo. Here is a pic of a costaricana i have outdoors. Sergio

post-3040-1256176689_thumb.jpg

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I have about seven of them as a ground cover under a red cedar tree. They have been there for four years. I also bought a container of seedlings for about $1.50. They are now all about 24" tall and quite full and a very nice dark green color. They had no trouble with the 28 degree night we had last winter. No frost touches them due to the canopy of the red cedar tree. I am very pleased with their effect as a ground cover. I'll post a photo sometime. They are doing much better than I expected here in St. Augustine, Florida.

Lou St. Aug, FL

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For a buck I'd say it's a fun palm to grow. It's common name is 'parlor' palm because of it'd indoor popularity. They are tuff too...I found one at my in-laws' house in a corner outside growing out of a broken terra cotta pot. It had been there like that for over five years. Looked like a half dead weed. With my mother-in-laws permission I took it under my wing and brought it back and even propergated it by cutting out some of the suckers. Now it's got 8 inches of trunk and thriving.

Vince Bury

Zone 10a San Juan Capistrano, CA - 1.25 miles from coast.

http://www.burrycurry.com/index.html

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For a buck I'd say it's a fun palm to grow. It's common name is 'parlor' palm because of it'd indoor popularity. They are tuff too...I found one at my in-laws' house in a corner outside growing out of a broken terra cotta pot. It had been there like that for over five years. Looked like a half dead weed. With my mother-in-laws permission I took it under my wing and brought it back and even propergated it by cutting out some of the suckers. Now it's got 8 inches of trunk and thriving.

C. elegans is solitary - no suckers. It must have been one of the clustering Chamaedoreas. (...or maybe some other similar genus?)

Tom

Bowie, Maryland, USA - USDA z7a
hardiestpalms.com

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C. elegans is a solitary, understory palm, that's delicate-looking but tough as nails, at least in its ability to survive in Palm Hell, namely steam-heated human homes with low light and nasty-dry humidity in the winter.

they'll eventually get 10 feet tall, but, usually, they tip over onto the ground and root where they hit.

the one thing they won't take is sun.

You kill that, and you need a doctor!

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Well most of what has been said fairly accurate. As they shove several into a pot to make them look bushier, when they have a bit of strength, they can be seperated quite easily as long as one is gentle with them. I have found that they do better once they have been put into pots individually. Great little house palms that do well where many wont. Good outdoors in a pot or in the ground as long as the strong sunlight doesnt get to them. Cold doesnt bother them in the least but they can only take the slightest touch of frost without burning. However even if one does get badly frostbitten, they more often than not will eventually come back to life, but I dont recommend allowing that to happen in the first place. They respond to water and fertilising too.

Peachy

I came. I saw. I purchased

 

 

27.35 south.

Warm subtropical, with occasional frosts.

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