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Phoenix sylvestris thorns poisonous?


phatmiata
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So im wondering if i need to worry about the thorns of Phoenix sylvestris ??? I have been poked before, but just lightly. Well somehow i managed to poke the heck outta myself on Friday moving one that was in a bucket off my truck. This one left a really sweet bruise on my forearm and was sore for the rest of the day. ts no longer sore but i have a 2" bruise where the tree left its mark. :blink:

Just wondering if any of the nursery guys on here know if i need to just chalk it up as a battle wound, or do i need worry about some infection, or poison it may carry, etc etc.

I think i will run duct tape around the base (thorns) next time i move these, doh!!

"Randy" IPS member # 150229

Dover, FL (West of Plant City, FL)

120 feet above sea level

Average Yearly Rainfall is 51.17 inches per year

Average Summer Temp 83F

Average Winter Temp 62F

USDA Zone 9a/9b

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As far as I know, they're not poisonous, but if you haven't had a tetanus booster lately, now might be a good time for one.

The big problem with those is that the needles can break off under the skin and really raise hell. One of our members had a real hair-raising encounter with that, which ended happily when the needle was removed.

These things can be very dangerous, as you already know.

If all you have is a bruise, you're probably okay. If you have any problems moving fingers, etc., or you have any pain radiating anywhere, get to a doctor fast.

I hope you're okay.

Let us know how this develops. Hopefully no problems. This life of a Phoenix Phetishist can be a real [expletive]. eh?

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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I'd be putting some hydrogen peroxide on the puncture wound, then some bacteriostatic ointment on it.

They can be really, really nasty, as as stated, even if one tiny piece broke off inside your arm, it can lead to a bad infection.

Rick Leitner

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

26.07N/80.15W

Zone 10B

Average Annual Low 67 F

Average Annual High 84 F

Average Annual Rainfall 62"

 

Riverfront exposure, 1 mile from Atlantic Ocean

Part time in the western mountains of North Carolina

Gratefully, the best of both worlds!

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They are not poisonous per se but I find them exceptionally painful. Or maybe my compromised immune system overreacted.

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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If I was poked, bye-bye phoenix. I was poked by a robellini and a Mediteranean at different times. Both felt the wrath of my anger (space for new palms). The Mediteranean is half gone and the robellini was lopped off. All of my wife's roses attacked me and they're gone too. :rolleyes:

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Don't use duct tape around the palm. You're gonna get poked trying to get it off. Wrap the base with a packing blanket and tie a bungee chord around it. Works like a charm.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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The wounds do seem very prone to infection, which can be very nasty. I'm not sure if it's something to do with the plants that encourages infection or maybe things that people spray on the plants, but either way you should keep the wound as clean as possible.

Someone posted pictures a year or two ago that showed the rapid progression of an infection in a hand wound from a Phoenix palm and it really didn't look like something you would want.

]

Corey Lucas-Divers

Dorset, UK

Ave Jul High 72F/22C (91F/33C Max)

Ave Jul Low 52F/11C (45F/7C Min)

Ave Jan High 46F/8C (59F/15C Max)

Ave Jan Low 34F/1C (21F/-6C Min)

Ave Rain 736mm pa

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Good suggestion, MattyB!

I have a P. syslvestris and my husband hates it when he cuts the grass. It isn't trunking yet so he gets poked. I've been poked a few times and get the bruise the next day. I haven't gotten an infection yet but I usually douse it with peroxide and wash it with soap. But they are nasty!

Palmmermaid

Kitty Philips

West Palm Beach, FL

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Iam with dave,yes if you had not taken ATC injection(tetanus)..its time to have one.And its not posionus because i was trimming all our phoenix palms,that includes the p.sylversteris.most of the ocassion i used to get poked in my hands & fingers.but the first time even i was bit worried so i did take ATC shot.but nowadays i do not bother but just wash the wound as Rick as said..But if one has diabetes,then double precaution is a must,since the wound want heal fast !

Here is a still for you to instill confidence & reduce fear... :huh:

post-108-1234243411_thumb.jpg

Love,

Kris :winkie:

love conquers all..

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.

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If you're a serious connoisseur (sp?) of NASTY pain, take a Phoenix spine under a fingernail . . . . . . .

Oh [expletive religious-obscene-gerund expletive yo-mama, etc.] !!!!! :crying::crying::crying::crying:

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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If you're a serious connoisseur (sp?) of NASTY pain, take a Phoenix spine under a fingernail . . . . . . .

Oh [expletive religious-obscene-gerund expletive yo-mama, etc.] !!!!! :crying::crying::crying::crying:

:lol:

love conquers all..

43278.gif

.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I once had an inch long spine of P. roebellinii go into the side of my head when I was clearing some cut fronds into the trailer. I headed straight to the hospital, waited for over an hour before somebody saw me and even then the nurse said they couldnt see anything after cutting away some of my hair!

About a week or so later the thing just popped out when the area on my head was iching! It was still nearly an inch long but all dark and brown.

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Dear Lee :)

you are very lucky ! and did you take any ATC injection to prevent any infection ? :hmm:

love,

Kris :)

Hi Kris

At that time I think the Tetanus was coming to an end but they did give me a new jab to keep me going. Well thank God I'm still here. :winkie:

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The spines on Phoenix is the reason I have very few growing in my garden. I do have one large Phoenix canariensis, a sylvestris and a couple of hybrids, but that's it. I had a large P.dactylifera that I had allowed to sucker. It was a giant tangle of fronds and impossible to trim, so I had it removed. It was growing near a path and I was afraid someone would lose an eye. Not only are the spines on Phoenix dangerous, but the tips of the fronds too.

The most dangerous palm I have is Trithrinax campestris. If you have ever been stuck by the tip of a frond, you won't forget it. They should be planted well away from foot traffic, as well as Phoenix.

Dick

  • Upvote 1

Richard Douglas

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