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Kris

Any pictures on CIDP

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iamjv

Wokandroll,

Nice sized CIDP!!! Do you have any closeup shots of the crown? This would certainly help in determining what might be wrong with the palm.

It seems to me that there are to many fronds remaining on the palm for just having been transplated. More than likely, the fronds are dying back because of the lack of roots to sustain them. Of course I am presuming you are giving the palm plenty of water... important to keep it hydrated. You might also want to find some palm fertilizer with micro-nutrients. I would imagine that the palm will recover given time and care to re-establish it's root system. Jv

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PricklyPearSATX

Kris:

I wish I had a picture of this CIDP. But, I don't so I will describe it.

It is at the San Antonio Botanical Gardens.

It was a hot day and I was doing volunteer work at the Botanical Gardens. I took a break from my work. I entered a garden called, "Meditation Garden". There was this huge CIDP. Underneath the CIDP was a bench.

I had never seen a bench underneath a palm before.

I was hot and needed to sit down, so I sat down on that bench.

My gosh. The shade was so dense. It was about 20 degrees cooler under that CIDP. Nothing grew under the palm. There was just the bench.

This was an old CIDP, yet it had retained fronds which hung down to about 4 feet about the ground. You had to crouch a bit under the fronds to go sit down on the bench.

It was quite awesome.

At that moment, I realized why this palm is the main shade tree in Iraq.

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iamjv

Linda, I think this is the CIDP you're talking about... this was shot back a couple of years ago and at a bit of a distance, so you can't see the lower region of the palm... Jv

post-362-1221611496_thumb.jpg

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Kris

Here is a lovely Link ! to the thread on 'CIDP_Red Fruticas' !

Hope you all enjoyed seeing it,as much as i did... :drool::yay:

Dear Linda, your narration of that CIDP,i must tell you that i could virtually feel the coolness of that shade...thanks for your time.

And Dear Jv,thanks for the above still,which makes Linda's narration more lively..

Thanks & Love,

Kris :)

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Exotic Life

Here is my own Phoenix again, it's growing really great! And trunc is getter fatter and fatter.

PICT0001(3).JPG

PICT0002(7).JPG

Robbin

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Kris

Dear Robbin :)

Lovely grouth rate and it seems that variety is a heavy trunking type ! :greenthumb: And i love that baby :drool:

Keep us all posted on its grouth rate...

thanks for the visuals !

lots of love,

Kris :)

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iamjv

Robbin,

That is an amazing phx for your part of the world.... very impressed. Jv

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Exotic Life

Thanks Kris, Jv.

Robbin

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iamjv

Robbin, tell us the growing conditions that phx experiences in the Netherlands... highs/lows, precipitation, how long its been planted, etc. thanks. Jv

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gilles06

Hi all,

Here is an old photo from NICE FRANCE in the 1900's years.

nice1900ia0.jpg

Ciao.

Gilles06.

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iamjv

Nice shot... I wonder if any of those palms are still alive... Jv

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plantapalm

I had a short cruise w/ a stop in Cozumel Mx. At the port they had a few monster CIDP's. When I saw them I thought of Kris, and this thread. So here are my stills for you Kris.

post-1388-1234417336_thumb.jpg

post-1388-1234417358_thumb.jpg

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edric

These are growing in New Smyrna Beach FL, and receive proper care, notice how green they are, they get plenty of Manganese, Ed

post-3109-1234418858_thumb.jpg

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Kris

Dear Michael :)

Thanks for those fentastic visuals..i simply love it ! :drool: And also thanks for remembering me while standing close to that jamboo...And i must say they have trimmed beautifully,since i growing these palms here purely to trim them in that fashion.though many would not like over trimming of palm(phoenix)..but iam attracted to this palm purely for its pineapple fruit resemblence. :)

Thanks & Love,

Kris :)

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Kris

Dear Friends :)

While reading our forum friends threads,i did come across few beautiful CIDPs thought i would add them here for all to see !

post-108-1234449077_thumb.jpg

post-108-1234449119_thumb.jpg

Love,

Kris :)

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Dutch John

Here a pic of a house not far from mine,in the south-west part of holland,about 20-25 miles from the north sea.

These guys were unprotected during the coldsnap a few weeks ago,and it reached about -8 celcius a few times,and also a few days when it stayed below zero during the day.

All together they saw about 3 weeks with nights well below zero.

I have no idea how long they've been here,but i will be keeping an eye on them the coming months.

post-3070-1234530151_thumb.jpg

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Exotic Life
Here is my own Phoenix again, it's growing really great! And trunc is getter fatter and fatter.

PICT0001(3).JPG

PICT0002(7).JPG

Robbin

I saw my pictures aren't there anymore, so here they are again :)

PICT0001-1.jpg

PICT0002.jpg

Robbin

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Exotic Life
Here a pic of a house not far from mine,in the south-west part of holland,about 20-25 miles from the north sea.

These guys were unprotected during the coldsnap a few weeks ago,and it reached about -8 celcius a few times,and also a few days when it stayed below zero during the day.

All together they saw about 3 weeks with nights well below zero.

I have no idea how long they've been here,but i will be keeping an eye on them the coming months.

post-3070-1234530151_thumb.jpg

Hi,

Thanks for sharing this picture, i live also in the Southwest of the Netherlands and i'm also growing a CIDP, pictures above. It looks like a good place to grow CIDP :) It's also fun to see that more and more people are planting palm trees and not only Trachycarpus fortunei anymore. Chamaerops species, other Trachycarpus species but also Butia can be seen more and more. And in summer there are lots of CIDP and Washingtonia's everywhere.

In with place is this house?

Robbin

Edited by Exotic Life

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Exotic Life
Robbin, tell us the growing conditions that phx experiences in the Netherlands... highs/lows, precipitation, how long its been planted, etc. thanks. Jv

Hi,

I'm sorry, i see that i never answer this question.

CIDP is a very populair palm for the summer months and they sold with hunderds then, the only thing is if you don't keep it inside or don't protect lot of this tree's would die. Most of the time not from the hard frost but the combination frost and humidity. For example winter 2006/2007 was very very mild and a big part of the country saw only a couple times frost and not lower then -3C/26.6F but still much palm tree died because the combination. So for now if you want growing a CIDP you must give a little protection during the winter months. But maybe, with the climate change we can grow it without protection maybe :)

About my own Phoenix, it has been planted in the spring of 2004 on a sunny spot where it has got the whole day sunshine. It's a more milder spot the the other side of our garden. The heat can't leave the garden easily and because that reason the temperature is always a little higher then the normal temperature. For example, if it's 30C in that part of the garden it can be also 33-35C. In July 2006, i recorded 37.2C and in the part of the garden where the Phoenix has been planted i saw +40C. It's drained very well, because i have here a sandy soil. So i think that place has got everything to grow a Phoenix very well. Another great thing what can be usefull sometimes is the place where i live. I living the in the southwest of the Netherlands and when it's winter the milder sea air can reach me the most of the time and because of that i have normally milder tempetures during the winter then other parts, but now the great thing somehow that sea air can't reach me always in summer. Because it can't reach me always, it's not that cooler what you expect from sea air.. and can it be hot here to. Maybe also a reason why i can grow a Washingtonia succesfull and in other parts of the country it's almost inpossible.

For growing speed, here are some pictures for example. For here it's a quite fast growth rate.

April 2005

001April2005.jpg

Novemer 2007

005November2007.jpg

Last summer after the first time trimming since i had planted this one.

PICT0001-1.jpg

It has also flowered for 2 times now, i hope when it's flowering again i can get some seeds on it. That would be interesting for other people over here because this one is well setteld and good growing in our climate.

Robbin

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Dutch John

Hello Robbin

the house is in Barendrecht,or maybe Ridderkerk.I'm not sure where the one stops and the other one starts. :blink:

Your CIDP is breathtaking ! How do you protect it ? Any pictures ?

Groeten,

John

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Exotic Life

John,

Thanks, I'm always every weekend in Rotterdam our surround Rotterdam, and sometimes also in Barendrecht or Ridderkerk but never seen this garden.

How i protect my phoenix? I just told about it, a couple reactions above here. I will take a look to find some pictures from the protection...

Robbin

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kristof p

Nice pictures!

i also grow P. canarensies in the garden but i only protect it during the coldest nights. i tigh up the leaves put some christmass lights around it and than i wrap it in fleece. when it gets colder than -5°C/-6°C i turn on the lights...last year it has seen -5.9°C without any protection and it had no damage...i think it's very imported that daytime temperatures raise wel above zero after a cold night or that the freeze is not combined with frost. last year i lost 4 onprotected CIDP after a period with subzero nights and cold days around +2°C combined with heavy frost! most nights were around the -2°C/-3°C with one night around -5°C. not that cold but that dammed frost killed them....not sure they were dead but they had serieus budrot...

there are lots of people around the Netherlands/Belguim who say that is impossible to grow CIDP in the garden but the problem is that most CIDP's we can buy around here are imported out of southern europe with very few roots and long greenhouse grown leaves...i think it is quite normal that such a plant dies in it's first winter (without any protection) even during a mild winter. most of those CIDP almost show no signs of growth during the frist two years and only make roots. they are much stronger after beeing planted in the ground a few years!

today i bought myself a nice P. reclinata, this one wil be planted in spring. i know it wil need some protection during the colder winter nights but so does a CIDP....

(dutch)John,

interesting those CIDP's did not had any protection. this gives me hope that someday mine also wil be fine without any protection. i live further south and more to the west and also closer to the sea than you and have about the same winter lows. this winter i had one night of -8.5°C, the other coldest nights were around the -6/-7 and lots of nights around -4°C....

during a 'normal' winter I very rarely go below -5°C.

Robbin,

your CIDP is looking fantastic, maybe someday my reclinata wil flower and then we can make a nice hybrid ;)

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Musi

I have seen young potted CIDP's infront of a café in central Amsterdam and they were unprotected throughout the winter.

According to the weather stats, Amsterdam had seen a minimum of -8.3, but probably the urban micro climate around that building it only got down to -4 I suppose.

I'll try taking a pic of these small ice CIDP's soon. :)

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kristof p

Dutch John,

i've just seen recent picture of those CIDP's in Ridderkerk and they are totaly defoliated :huh:...just shows again that -7/-8 realy is around the limit for canarensis leaves...mabey not for a short time but winternights are long as are the freezes during the depts of winter at our latitude.

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Dutch John

Yes,i just saw them on the dutch forum,too.almost got tears in my eyes. :unsure:

too bad,they were beautiful.

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kristof p
Yes,i just saw them on the dutch forum,too.almost got tears in my eyes. :unsure:

too bad,they were beautiful.

yes, too bad. if only they gave them some protection they would still look great...

let's hope they come back in spring/summer...-8°C is deadly for the leaves but i do not think the palm is killed by that temperature. tough it was a long and cold two weeks :unsure:

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Exotic Life
Robbin,

your CIDP is looking fantastic, maybe someday my reclinata wil flower and then we can make a nice hybrid ;)

Sounds like a great plan, also because my CIDP is already for a longer time in the ground so it's well-known with our weather. :)

May i ask where you have seen that picture from the Phoenix in Ridderkerk? Or can you post the picture over here?

Robbin

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kristof p

Robbin,

you can see the pictures on the groeninfo forum....

yes, your CIDP seems to be happy...i doubt my reclinata wil grow much the first year outside....i hope we wil have a warm but not a very hot summer (i need to think about my Juania to :rolleyes:)

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FRITO

Robin, your CIDP has grown vey quick. it looks great after your trim (not too much)

I am also happy to see more members from europe growing palms. kristof and John glad to see you guys interacting here! :greenthumb:

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Exotic Life
Robin, your CIDP has grown vey quick. it looks great after your trim (not too much)

I am also happy to see more members from europe growing palms. kristof and John glad to see you guys interacting here! :greenthumb:

Hi,

Thanks you!

I'm agree that it's fun to see more members from Europe (Northwest), it's more and more populair over here.. also the Garden centra's are more and more selling different palm species. Too bad, this winter was the coldest since years why lots of palm trees and other exotics are damaged or dead trough the whole country but also belgium, Germany, the UK....

Robbin

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Exotic Life
Robbin,

you can see the pictures on the groeninfo forum....

yes, your CIDP seems to be happy...i doubt my reclinata wil grow much the first year outside....i hope we wil have a warm but not a very hot summer (i need to think about my Juania to :rolleyes:)

You're right, looks not really great..

For other people where we talking about visit this link: http://www.groeninfo.com/forum/exotische_p...kerk_r_i_p.html

Everything is in dutch but for watching pictures, nobody must to speak dutch anyway :)

About my CIDP, it's really a surviver! I don't know when you known Marc Devrome from Palmhunter? But i buy this palm in 2004 from palmhunter in a sales action, very cheap and a good price! I have to of them but one died without any reason, but later i heard that all the palms from that batch are died everywhere. I talk to him later and he was saying that i'm lucking that this one has survived. The reason why all the palms could died, because it looked like the palms are digged up with not to many roots in Spaint, put them in little pots and transporterd to the colder Belgium. So when i bought this one, it has lot more leafes, but it stopped and after that only leafes from the first pictures was left. And since that time, it's growing very well and i think for our climate very fast, but i'm also thinking it's on the right place! The whole day sun, well drained soil, and one of the mildest parts of this country. So i can't miss this palm anymore, if this one died, them i'm gonna die! :P

Robbin

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kristof p

i'm glad to Luke, i must say i find it an easy goeing forum. i have much to learn (especially about the more tropical palms) and this forum is a very good medium for that.

at first i tought most of you guys would think we are crazy to grow palms in the climate were we live and it is sometimes crazy to keep them alive in our winters but the satisfaction of seeing them growing hapily during most of the year is great and it makes me forget about our long cold winters.

if you could see my garden in the winter you would think it is a camp for refugees especially this winter :lol: i go to great extremes to grow the palms i want to grow. maybe i'm a fool or maybe not...i dont care :rolleyes:

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Kris

Gentlemen kindly stick to this topic header " Any Pictures On CIDP" Do not turn this into a discussion topic on problems related to Cidp's & cold damage.. :blink:

Only healthy stills of this babe is needed preferably huge stout fruting female CIDP's are welcome here ! :winkie:

i.e less talking,more visuals of healthy CIDP's from around the globe ! :lol:

Lots of love,

Kris :)

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Guest LeftCoastAngler

Here's a few in Daytona Beach right next to the County Park. ...Sorry for the pic quality, it was 07:30 on Sunday morning, race day. :)

~LCA.

CIMG4793.jpg

And the beach that morning too:

CIMG4796.jpg

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Harry

In habitat, Puerto de la cruz, Tenerife

post-1782-1235037664_thumb.jpg

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Troy_ATX

This is one of the roads next to Disneyland in California. Rows of CIDPs as far as the eye can see.

post-1674-1235062741_thumb.jpg

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nomolos

DSCF2450.jpg

Near kingston Beach Tas

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Gan Eden

By the Swan River, Perth, Western Australia

Perth%20May%202005%20Perth%20Palms.jpg

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