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Tracy

I planted this hybrid Coccothrinax in February 2018 and everything looked normal.  There was a small plant in the pot with it which was from a second seedling of the same plant, so i was getting 2 for 1 I thought.  Well fast forward and the main plant kept leaning to the side.  Attempts to straighten it were unsuccessful because it was solid, not flopping over.  I thought I was going to lose the plant, and finally decided to prop it on a decorative rock once it was essentially horizontal.  I finally can see what was making it lean to the side, it was growing a doinker which was pushing it the main trunk off to the side.  It's very strange.  I ended up looking up to see what species of Coccothrinax clump and see that pumila and fageldei are thought to clump.  The plant was thought to be a hybrid of Coccothrinax borhidiana with another unknown species.  While I've seen plenty of doinkers on Dypsis species, this was a new one on me.  Anyone else seen anything like this with a Coccothrinax?

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Tracy

Closer up of that doinker and a little different angle so you can see the deformed new leaves emerging.

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Palm Tree Jim

It appears that the palm decided to start a new growing point and expel the original growth.

Unusual indeed and I have never seen this.....at least in my experience.

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The Germinator

I had that same thing happen to one of my Sabals.

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Merlyn2220

If the original point keeps on growing, then you'll end up with a 2-headed Coccothrinax.  Maybe this is how other unique 2, 3 and 4 headed Pindos, Queens and Phoenix start?

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Tracy
On 7/12/2019 at 6:32 AM, Merlyn2220 said:

If the original point keeps on growing, then you'll end up with a 2-headed Coccothrinax.

I may have 3 growth points either that or one plant with two growth points and a third plant.  The original plant is pushing out a new leaf which can't be seen in the photos while the smaller plant that was always emerging from a subterranean growth point is pushing a new leaf as well as the doinker.  Very peculiar. 

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joe_OC

Weird!  Any trauma to the main growth point at any time?

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Tracy
12 hours ago, joe_OC said:

Weird!  Any trauma to the main growth point at any time?

Not that I am aware while it was in my custody.

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Davidl

I have had young Coccothrinax do the same thing from not long after the first few fronds.  Many times the original growth point died. That was my experience anyway. 

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