Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Tracy
2 hours ago, 5150cycad said:

This Encephalartos Princeps caught my eye the other day. 

Nice, well grown and looking good Brian!  I love the very formal structure E. princeps have from a relatively small size and continuing through when they get quite large!  Add to the structure the impeccable color and you have a winner.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

I returned from a business trip out of town last night to enjoy progression in a colorful flush.  Ceratozamia robusta showing how colorful their flushes can be.  At least last night it was the Cycad of the garden!

20181012-104A0809.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm Tree Jim
On 10/4/2018, 1:33:09, 5150cycad said:

This Encephalartos Princeps caught my eye the other day. 

EE00EEBD-AA60-4DD9-ACD9-FD90F7992FFB.jpeg

Princeps are one of my favorites.

Well grown Bryan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

The colorful collars on this Encephalartos lehmannii really jumped out at me during the rains.  The leaf collars with the orange highlights contrast nicely against the lehmannii's silvery blue leaflets.  You can see how the waxy substance on the leaflets has worn off the bottom oldest flush.  I'm sure I'll see more of that washing effect on all my blue cycads after this winter's rains are done!

20190303-104A2651.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Josue Diaz
On 10/13/2018 at 5:54 AM, Tracy said:

I returned from a business trip out of town last night to enjoy progression in a colorful flush.  Ceratozamia robusta showing how colorful their flushes can be.  At least last night it was the Cycad of the garden!

20181012-104A0809.jpg

I planted two of these this last year. They've each thrown new leaves one at a time, but I'm really looking forward to a big flush like that. 

20190101_164032.jpg

20190101_164047.jpg

Edited by Josue Diaz
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
21 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

They've each thrown new leaves one at a time, but I'm really looking forward to a big flush like that. 

20190101_164032.jpg

Josue, those look like pretty good size plants already, so I wouldn't be surprised if the next flush you see a multiple leaves pushed.  Mine had a slight setback immediately after putting it in the ground after year's of pot life, but the following year did much better.  Ironically, I had the opposite experience with a Ceratozamia mexicana that was about the same age, had lived in pots for over a dozen years, and doubled the number of leaves as soon as I put it in the ground.  So the behavior after planting can be unpredictable in my experience.  Both were planted in the same soil, about the same time of year, in similar light situations.   Eventually you will get some big colorful flushes out of them!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

Cycas debaoensis showing no signs of cool damage and apparently thoroughly enjoying a wet winter.  It certainly has a tropical feel to it.

20190306-104A2691.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marius

My current favorite is E middelburgensis. Here are pics of my two plants. 

image.jpg

image.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
10 hours ago, Marius said:

My current favorite is E middelburgensis. Here are pics of my two plants.

Very nice plants Marius!  I have found this species to be a pretty slow growing species when compared to some of the others in the eugene-maraisii complex, although based on the look they are worth the patience.  I got mine as a 1 leaf seedling a few years back, so it's still pretty small.  How have yours grown when compared to dyerianus, nubimontanus, cupidus, etc.?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marius

Hi Tracy. Thank you. 

I actually planted my two middelburgensis at the same time as two cupidus, a nubimontanus and a deyerianus. That was 3 and a half years ago. The smaller of my middelburgensis has flushed every year since planted (with the number of leaves per flush increasing each time) the bigger one has only once thus far. 

The cupidus and nubi flushed this summer for the first time ( though they have produced numerous suckers over three years. 

The deyerianus has flushed once, but it’s suckers all produced leaves annually. 

I don’t have Eugene maraisii. 

I’d say that my smaller middelburgensis has been the fastest of the above lot. 

Compared to my other encephalartos the lot above are slow. My natalensis all grew from three leaf seedlings into plants with 20-35cm dia stems in the same period of time. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5150cycad
On 3/8/2019 at 8:46 PM, Marius said:

My current favorite is E middelburgensis. Here are pics of my two plants. 

image.jpg

image.jpg

Marius,

You have a very nice selection of cycads. I still can’t believe how big those Freddy gs are that you posted. I know a couple of guys that would kill to have those in their garden. All your Cycads look very happy. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merlyn

Right now my favorite is one that I don't have, a Dioon Rzedowskii.  I saw this one at Leu Gardens on Saturday and I neeeeeeed one!  :D 

Dioon Rzedowskii cropped.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marius
2 hours ago, 5150cycad said:

Marius,

You have a very nice selection of cycads. I still can’t believe how big those Freddy gs are that you posted. I know a couple of guys that would kill to have those in their garden. All your Cycads look very happy. 

Hi Merlyn. Thank you. They do seem happy. I have been in love with Cycads since I was in high school. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marius

Thanks 5150   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
23 hours ago, 5150cycad said:

You have a very nice selection of cycads

Speaking of nice collections, any cycads looking particularly good in your garden after all the rain Brian?  I'm sure you can come up with something that has enjoyed the extra water.  I suspect that once we do get a warm up, that a lot of pent up juice will translate into some nice flushes!  I guess I shouldn't a$$ume that weather will warm anytime soon though after so many surprises this winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5150cycad
5 hours ago, Tracy said:

Speaking of nice collections, any cycads looking particularly good in your garden after all the rain Brian?  I'm sure you can come up with something that has enjoyed the extra water.  I suspect that once we do get a warm up, that a lot of pent up juice will translate into some nice flushes!  I guess I shouldn't a$$ume that weather will warm anytime soon though after so many surprises this winter.

With all the recent rain the weeds have taken over. Waiting for the weather to warm up before I even think about weeding. Here is a picture of an arenarius that stood out to me today. Maybe just because of all the green weeds around it. Can’t wait for the weather to warm up. It’s been an unusual winter this year. 

4DD15C9C-97DD-4A32-A980-130684A614BC.jpeg

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm Tree Jim

Nice blue on that plant Bryan!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cycadjungle

     Over all, my favorite cycad is Ceratozamia hildae. It looks like bamboo, but it is a cycad. It grows straight up so it doesn't use a lot of space. It may be one of the most cold hardy cycads. One person has told me they had 12f with no leaf damage. It is pest free. They mature in 5 years. The leaflets are arranged in clusters looking like a bow tie. This is a plant that can be grown outside, all over Florida.

     Cycas debaoensis could be my favorite cycad, but it has its faults. They grow fast and look beautiful. The faults, it gets Asian scale, (which is a problem here in Florida) and can burn its leaves in the lower to middle 20s. If it wasn't for its faults, this would be my favorite cycad.

IMG_20190314_100010.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darold Petty

I have very limited space in my tiny,  urban garden.  I have three plants of Ceratozamia hildae, growing well.  I just moved them up from 4 inch pots into the standard '1-gallon'  (6x7 inches).

Could I pot all three into one larger diameter pot, perhaps 10 or 12 inches in diameter?  This would be helpful for my space constraints, and result in a more full look.  

Please advise,... thanks,   :winkie:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cycadjungle

You could for now, but put them as far apart as you can. They will get 4-5 inches in diameter, so maybe a 15 gallon, which is about 15 inches would hold them for decades.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cycadjungle

     If usability was not as important as just a cool plant, Ceratozamia euryphyllidia would be my favorite cycad. This was my holy grail plant for 20 years until Loran Whitelock became the first to make seedlings available in cultivation. His plants will never be bred again, so it is important for those who bought seedlings from him, to make more seeds and plants for others to use in future breeding. These plants will get 15 feet tall with leaflets even wider than they are now. Even when I sell all my cycads, these and a few others will stay. These plants are just gorgeous!

IMG_20181123_111904.jpg

IMG_20181227_103859.jpg

IMG_20181227_103742.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5150cycad
1 hour ago, cycadjungle said:

     If usability was not as important as just a cool plant, Ceratozamia euryphyllidia would be my favorite cycad. This was my holy grail plant for 20 years until Loran Whitelock became the first to make seedlings available in cultivation. His plants will never be bred again, so it is important for those who bought seedlings from him, to make more seeds and plants for others to use in future breeding. These plants will get 15 feet tall with leaflets even wider than they are now. Even when I sell all my cycads, these and a few others will stay. These plants are just gorgeous!

IMG_20181123_111904.jpg

IMG_20181227_103859.jpg

IMG_20181227_103742.jpg

That leaf is incredible. What a cool looking ceratazamia. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
On 3/14/2019 at 12:17 PM, cycadjungle said:

 If usability was not as important as just a cool plant, Ceratozamia euryphyllidia would be my favorite cycad. This was my holy grail plant for 20 years until Loran Whitelock became the first to make seedlings available in cultivation. His plants will never be bred again, so it is important for those who bought seedlings from him, to make more seeds and plants for others to use in future breeding. These plants will get 15 feet tall with leaflets even wider than they are now. Even when I sell all my cycads, these and a few others will stay. These plants are just gorgeous! 

Definitely a holy grail plant and spectacular in person with those leaflets!  I've been tempted :evil:  on this species, but worry how it would fare outside here in So Cal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cycadjungle

They are doing great in certain parts of so cal. Closer to the coast, they are growing better than mine are. Farther east, where it gets hotter and more dry, not so well. They will burn leaves at around 23-24. I keep mine in the greenhouse. I'll add this picture, next phase on next generation just starting. Picture didn't load.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm Tree Jim
10 hours ago, Tracy said:

Definitely a holy grail plant and spectacular in person with those leaflets!  I've been tempted :evil:  on this species, but worry how it would fare outside here in So Cal.

I'm game to try this cycad!

Provide some canopy/protection and away we go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

I was walking by an enclosure for a large iguana or lizard from Cuba when I noticed on the edge of the enclosure an unusual to see cycad from Cuba:  Microcycas calcoma. 

20190330-104A2852.jpg

20190330-104A2853.jpg

20190330-104A2855.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

This still small Encephalartos arenarius x latifrons is showing a bit more character with the newest flush.  I have two and this one seems to be the more interesting at this stage.

20190526-104A3629.jpg

20190526-104A3630.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5150cycad
18 minutes ago, Tracy said:

This still small Encephalartos arenarius x latifrons is showing a bit more character with the newest flush.  I have two and this one seems to be the more interesting at this stage.

20190526-104A3629.jpg

20190526-104A3630.jpg

Very nice Tracy. I have noticed that all my latifrons hybrids seem to show more more of the latifrons characteristics with each flush. Here is a picture of my blue arenarius x latifrons. The leaves of the last flush started to recurve. Look forward to seeing all these latifrons hybrids mature. 1BC7B63B-AE1D-40EB-853B-0B62F29D4955.thumb.jpeg.d277cf1248eb8af49923ac955bebe035.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
3 hours ago, 5150cycad said:

Look forward to seeing all these latifrons hybrids mature. 

I like the width of the leaflets that yours is showing.  My arenarius x latifrons have had more elongated leaves, like the arenarius parent thus far, so I was encouraged by the latest more twisted and slightly less elongated leaves.  As you observe, they change over time with each flush, and mine are still very juvenile plants.  Plenty of reasons for optimism!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

A tight stacking

is very attracting!

20190602-104A3639.jpg

20190602-104A3640.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cycadnewbie

Absolutely beautiful!... how big is the caudex? All your plants look super healthy and happy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
1 hour ago, Cycadnewbie said:

how big is the caudex?

I haven't measured with calipers, but I would eyeball it at about 5" in diameter right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cycadnewbie

Mine is a little smaller and flushing right now. It is about 4"...  This hybrid is at the very top of my favorite ones. Thank you for sharing the photos.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merlyn

Usually my favorite is whichever one that is flushing, but right now it's this giant Encephalartos Hildebrandtii that I bought from PT member ChuckG last weekend.  It looks a little rough at the moment with some sunburn from our recent rain-free and brutally hot spring, and a lot of damaged leaves from moving this ~500lb monster in the back of my van.  It's utterly dwarfing the somewhat-too-close Sylvester on the left.  I'm counting on the Sylvester to outgrow the Encephalartos in a year or two and provide some shade to the East.  I'm going to transplant a couple of big Ice Cream Bananas to the West (right) side to give it some afternoon shade, because right now it's getting blasted from 2-5pm. 

P1050105 cropped.JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
10 hours ago, Merlyn2220 said:

right now it's this giant Encephalartos Hildebrandtii that I bought from PT member ChuckG last weekend.

Yup, that is a big boy (girl).  If it gets fried in your sun, at least it is just another flush away from green leaves.  The use of banana's for shade is a good call because they are so quick and yet easily removed when you don't need shade anymore.  I have seen this species planted in some public gardens but can't recall seeing any in local private gardens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merlyn
22 minutes ago, Tracy said:

Yup, that is a big boy (girl).  If it gets fried in your sun, at least it is just another flush away from green leaves.  The use of banana's for shade is a good call because they are so quick and yet easily removed when you don't need shade anymore.  I have seen this species planted in some public gardens but can't recall seeing any in local private gardens.

It's a girl, Chuck cut off two really big cones before moving it.  They were about 30lb each, so it was better to remove them than risk breaking them off in transit and damaging the caudex.  Plus it was in a ~100 gallon trash can and nearly impossible to move by hand.  

I have about 10 species of bananas, and by a factor of at least 3 the fastest growing is the Ice Cream.  One went from 2 feet tall in February to over 12 feet tall now with 2 offsets.  I'm going to move it over into the sun line this weekend, along with two other 4-5' Ice Creams.  I like using the bananas for instant shade, I've moved them all over the place and never had one die.  The worst damage is usually 1-2 weeks of setback before they start growing like weeds again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

I love the plumose leaflets on Encephalartos caffer and this little one flushing is just oozing with appeal right now.

20190608-104A3756.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GDLWyverex

I am really taken with this one

ZamiaNesophila.jpg.823d22025d771ac27beb8dc39fc1ba33.jpg

zamia nesophila

 

Richard

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • Matt in OC
      By Matt in OC
      Three cycads for sale. Pick up in east San Diego. $65/ea or best offer, but definitely want them gone ASAP! PM for more info.
      Dioon Edule- 9” caudex
      Cycas revoluta- 18” & 16 “ tall trunk
      Zamia Furfuracia clump- about 5 
       






    • Coasta
      By Coasta
      Hello All!!! 
      I know its early but I am prepping for next summer! I am in Mesa arizona, so it gets hot here.  Recently I have purchased some encephalartos cycads and a Dioon. I have all of them in pots and have zero shade in my yard. I am going to be building a 16×16 shade area next summer and I am wondering for encephalartos what would be your opinion on the best percentage? So far I have seen 50 percent, but wondering if anyone has had any luck with a lower percent. 
      As a side note, I am looking at aluminet shade cloth which acts as a mirror and reflects heat away from the shade structure. 
       
      Thanks for your time! 
    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      My gardens have been in place for over 10 years so many of my palms have grown to maturity. However, I still lose individual plants over the course of a year, which give me opportunities to sort through palms I've grown from seeds to fill gaps in the yard. Since fall began I have planted the following plants, including one Areca catechu semi dwarf and five Areca catechu dwarfs that demanded to go into the ground.
      Areca catechu semi dwarf - replaced a fading Livistona nitida

      Areca catechu dwarf #1 - replaced a dead Satakentia on east side of jungle

      Areca catechu dwarfs #2 & #3 - on east side of house

      Areca catechu dwarf #4 on west side of house - replaces dead Chambeyronia Hookeri

      Areca catechu dwarf #5 - west side of jungle in place of dead Livistona jenkinsiana

    • Coasta
      By Coasta
      Hello all! Just wanted to get opinios on how fast it takes a cycad in the seedling stage to develop a caudex? 
      I know there are many types of cycads that grow and different rates. 
      My personal favorite cyads right now are encephalartos. 
      What is the typical rate from seedling to developing a small caudex for encephalartos? 
      Is it better to pay for something that has a caudex developed or stick with seedlings and watch them grow?
      Also what is the typical amount of time for germination?
    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      I have a number of small to very large potted (mostly) cycads. Most of them are from genus Zamia, which grows very well in my humid, subtropical climate, but I also have some Dioon and Encephalartos. The Zamia are species but also hybrids of loddigesii, pumila and variegata. Earlier this year I gathered them together and set them on blocks on our garden lot. There they are coning and producing seeds and seedlings. Last winter I finally planted my largest Encephalartos horridus. And my Dioon edule has grown huge and is putting out pups. Today I took the following photos.
      Cycad Row, Cape Coral, FL, 2020
       v. 'Queretaro Blue' has grown huge and is putting out pups. Today I
       
×
×
  • Create New...