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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/23/2019 in all areas

  1. 14 points
    If patience is a virtue, then I feel I've finally won some sort of a prize! These two D. carlsmithii were planted out from small cones back in late 2008 and honestly, I'm surprised they even survived. They have chugged along steadily, getting fatter, taller, more colorful, and finally started trunking. Actually, slow to trunk is a good thing, as it adds more time to enjoy what will become a fairly large palm. Being at eye level for such a long time gives plenty of time to admire such a special palm.....surely that's the real prize. Tim
  2. 4 points
    After 2.5 months, my first Allagoptera arenaria seed germinated...
  3. 2 points
    Here's a similar sized Latania to compare. aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  4. 2 points
    Roystonea regia growing in Errol Estates, between Apopka and Zellwood.
  5. 2 points
    Here in Holland we have a few days with excellent weather, so Cocos (and Becarriophoenix also) is placed outside out of the wind, temperature around 33 degrees Celcius. End of the day it’s going inside again. The new leaf is coming along nicely.
  6. 1 point
  7. 1 point
    These are photos of a grove of majesty palms (around 15 total palms) in my brother's old place in Long Beach. Photos of the grove were taken in 2008 and then in 2012 before he sold the place. Needless to say, he liked majesty palms a lot. Mike Arends Leilani Estates, Hawaii
  8. 1 point
    I know some really don't like these but I think they look awesome when taken care of. Not rare but still something that adds a great tropical look to the garden. I have on in my greenhouse I'm thinking about planting. There's some in this area that actually look pretty good. I saw one near my place that has about 30 feet of trunk and looks great. I took a pic of it last summer but can't get a good one since it's in a backyard.
  9. 1 point
    Let's see if I can post photos from my phone
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    I was fortunate to have the opportunity to buy a clinostigma gronophyllum recently. Seems like there is very little info / pictures online on this beautiful palm. Anyone here on the forum growing it? Here’s mine planted out: And here’s a photo I took at Floribunda. Not the best lighting so hopefully Knell will see this post and can post a few more pics of this one. looking forward to hopefully seeing more pictures from palm talk gardens.
  12. 1 point
  13. 1 point
    This is a majesty palm in my brother's old place in Long Beach. Photo was taken in 2008. Mike Arends Leilani Estates, Hawaii
  14. 1 point
    That's a really good growth rate it seems to me. Congrats.
  15. 1 point
    Nice collection, and welcome to Palmtalk..
  16. 1 point
    Those coconuts are really impressive. One of them looks to have ~20ft of trunk? Not something I expected to see in Orlando! Thanks for sharing!
  17. 1 point
    It looks like a fungus. Have you applied liquid copper fungicide down the crown and around the base?
  18. 1 point
    Pinanga glaucescenspinanga densiflorapinanga aristrataNew computer I am having some trouble figuring this out
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
    That gets this thread caught up again with new plantings. Many more to come when I get back home in 10 days. And here are some random shots around the garden. Thanks for looking!
  21. 1 point
    And last planting of the day was a Dypsis Decipiens hybrid. Seed from these came from a garden here on the big island and I’m very curious what it crossed with. Maybe it crossed with something smaller like Albofarinosa? and here’s a pic that shows the decipiens hybrid and the Orania. Dypsis Robusta in the middle behind them.
  22. 1 point
    Last night got down to 48.4F and today's high barely touched 60F with bright sun and gusty winds. I'm highly prone to bronchitis in winter weather so have been stuck in the house nearly all day. I could clean but where's the fun in that? About an hour ago I ventured outside to take photos for a palm topic I dreamed up. The genus Gaussia consists of 5 species from the Caribbean and Central America, of which I have found four. They are certainly not the most gorgeous palms in the world but they have their good points. G. gomez-pompae is sometimes called the "Carbibbean bottle palm" because when young it has a fat, swollen base. As it gets older it outgrows that trait. G. princeps is slow-growing with a stiff, upright crown and is considered the most attractive species. G. attenuata has a much reduced swollen stem when young. G. maya is typically pinnate and was widely planted in FL decades ago. The fifth species is the rare and odd G. spirituana from central Cuba. I've not had any luck finding it to complete my Gaussia quintet. These palms do very well in alkaline soil and have dry season drought tolerance in FL. They are hardy to zones 10/11, with G. maya to possibly 9b. Gaussia princeps Gaussia gomez-pompae Gaussia attenuata Gaussia maya G. maya seeds
  23. 1 point
    the blotchiness in the color is K deficiency, more localized in the leaf. Pale green could be Mg or Fe deficiency or both. With your mild weather I'd get the potassium down, but don't over do it. Also garden lime would be nice, you need a balanced Mg:Ca ratio to get good results and garden lime will help with the pH. Acidic sol pH reduces the bioavailability of Mg, Ca and to a somewhat lesser extent K. Check out the bio availibility in this chart on page 2. http://www.horiba.com/fileadmin/uploads/Scientific/water_quality/Documents/Application_Notes/HIS/22_-_Soil_pH_and_Nutrient_Availability.pdf Also balance in needed for best bioavailability. Too much CA, you get Mg deficiency and that might be a soil thing(high Ca soil).. IYour butia doesnt look bad which means you have some time, but get the potassium down as it is lost most quickly. I would also investigate the pH, if its too low the fertilizer you add wont be uptaken by the plant.
  24. 1 point
    This is the biggest Carpoxylon macrospermum in the collection here at Leu Gardens. It was acquired from Jeff Searle back in Nov. 2004 as a 1 gallon size specimen and planted out in Aug. 2005. It and a 2nd specimen acquired and planted at the same time survived the winter of 2009-10. Both had moderate foliage burn. The next winter (2010-11) was also cold but not as bad. One specimen declined in 2011 and died. The specimen in the photo survived but produced stunted growth for about a year but then grew out of it and is thriving now. Since then we have added 6 more to the collection. It seems hardier than Cocos and Adonidia but more tender than Wodyetia and Roystonea. (The palm to the right is Ravenea hildebrandtii)
  25. 1 point
    Adjacent to the palm is one of our specimens of Cyrtostachys elegans x renda.



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