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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/23/2020 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    Yesterday a yellowing frond fell away from my oldest (20 years old) Rhopalostylis sapida in the front yard and this colorful spathe is now visible until it pops open to reveal the inflorescence hidden within.
  2. 5 points
    I just went back and looked at the more recent speed of growth of my full sun(largest) Beccariophoenix alfredii. These palms start out kind of slow but I was surprised at the last 2 years, I had to check the file dates to convince myself. We do have a long growing season here and I have more recently been putting down a few more lbs of florikan on this palm so that might be part of it. But huge roots and never cutting off green may have combined with the florikan to increase the growth of this palm. Here it is in dec 2017 and dec 2019 and it was hit with one advective freeze 30F for 5-6 hrs and of course hurricane IRMA winds at a "mild" 65-75 mph for 5-6 hrs. BA was my least damaged pinnate palm in those events. So patience with your BA, let it get the roots down and make sure its well fed and in full sun and you might be surprised. My other BA started out in half shade which I removed the canopy and they are now growing very well. This was was always in full sun, the overhead oak branch was to the south so that tree, which has since been removed, wasnt shading the BA at 20' away. the second pic was taken from the opposite direction since I no longer have enough clear path to avoid the use of a distorting wide angle lens (from that direction) on this 25'+ overall monster.
  3. 5 points
    Here you go, another hideous Dypsis trunk for you.
  4. 4 points
    This is my tree, about 6 years planted from a 3 gallon.
  5. 3 points
    I have a Bismarckia in the neighbourhood this is how bismarckias perform in high humid wet tropics . (Costa Rica)
  6. 3 points
    I’d have to say maybe my Dypsis Lanceolata, although most stuff comes through pretty good except for maybe a small Pembana I have; seems to have yellowed up quite a bit this winter?
  7. 2 points
    It's a cool, fat bottomed spindle...
  8. 2 points
    I have several of them and they never agree, so accuracy of actual temp is not their strong point. What they are good at is telling you the difference in surface temps of objects and/or approximate temp of an object. I've used them for checking the difference in temps on various parts of coconut palms on cool nights. I have several of the laser temp guns because I used to build and rebuild cars for people. When I'd fire up a new build I'd have someone checking header temps to be sure all cylinders were firing correctly, one person checking head temps at each cylinder, one person checking when the thermostat opened and radiator fans came on. Plus a spare laser temp gun in case of battery or other problems with one of the guns. Hot objects look just like cold objects till they turn red (if metal), which is long after a hand would get burned.
  9. 2 points
    Not to humblebrag but definitely my D. Marojejyi. Most everything else is beat up/yellowed.
  10. 2 points
    Whoever the city hired to trim this Washingtonia must not like them - I haven't seen one hacked this badly before! At least they left the spear intact on the second one. These are near my work and will look pretty stupid for a while before they recover. Maybe they thought it was a crape myrtle?
  11. 2 points
    That was strange. My picture did not make it on the original post. Here it is:
  12. 2 points
    Cant say Ive ever "hated" a palm. D.decaryi is a nice palm when grown well and it has given us so many very cool hybrids. The only palms that I can say look bad are usually not the fault of the palm itself but more the fault of the grower.
  13. 2 points
    Gaussia princeps growing in my garden in S. Florida. It's about 20 - 22 years from seed. No supplemental water after it was established and on a small mound with p rock (oolitic limestone) added to increase the pH.
  14. 1 point
    Btw...if you ain’t nevah seen old folks move fast be at the gate at eight when it opens...and get outta the way you would think we were rushing to buy wedding dresses or something...but plants..? Make sure the asylum is locked good next time
  15. 1 point
    No, I dont think 28F would matter at this point. This palm took 5-6 hrs of 30F without any sign of stress. Big(35') royals and 20-25' kentiopsis were badly burned losing most or all of their crowns. I just think small alfies are susceptible to frost, put the frost cloth on it while small. BA have taken much lower temperature than 28F without frost out west. But little ones are frost tender. There are other threads on here about that. I am finding the new search tool not as good as the old one.
  16. 1 point
    Back home when I’m not down south, I work for the municipality doing garden work for the city during the summer months. One of the things I get to look after is our 2 Trachycarpus fortunei plants which are both housed in a tall insulated box with a Christmas bow every year given its height and one Butia capita. all were shipped about a year ago from Montreal from coconut mikes business. here’s some shots (I included one I’ve been looking after in a pot the past couple of years also from home)
  17. 1 point
    You mean like this Normanbya normanbyi in my back yard ? It's at least 25 years old....then commenced a double head ?
  18. 1 point
    When I look at those palms all I see is the Alien Facehugger
  19. 1 point
    Calyptrocalyx albertisianus has all the hallmarks of a robust ornamental, performing effortlessly in my indoor palm ranch. Fresh seed germinate after a couple of weeks, with subsequent growth rate seemingly 'unrivalled'. They also put on a colour show from 'day one'. The leaves don't appear sensitive to the usual spotting, yellowing or brown tips suffered by so many other palms; they have a stiff, parchment-like feel to them, which probably helps. I've raised these seedlings in a humidity chamber with bottom heat, but frankly, I feel that with summer here, these can continue growing indoors without any special care and hopefully not suffer any setbacks. Wish me luck! I think these are one of the most 'palm-grower friendly' exotic species I've ever tried. I'm sure they're going to look great as potted plants, if a lack of high humidity isn't too much of an issue. What's your recommendation for an attractive, indoor palm?
  20. 1 point
    Here’s another shot from a year ago Dec. 2018. Soil is typical Santa Clara Valley yellow clay but fairly heavily amended over the years so loam first 15” deep and then pure clay. It drains well however.
  21. 1 point
    Foxy Lady with southern exposure in front yard. First pic is from 2013, next pic is from 2019.
  22. 1 point
    It is possible, but the more I read and talk to others, I'm starting to think that the larger one is the "Big Curly", and the other is a different variation of Dypsis prestoniana. I was looking at photos of Bill Sanford's flower spathe on his Big Curly, and then comparing to mine, and the girth is nowhere near it. Flowers just opened this morning.
  23. 1 point
    wow!!!! I need to get over there sooner than later
  24. 1 point
    this one at my sisters place is amazing
  25. 1 point
    I have seen this plant many times at different locales over the years....but none were near as large as the one I saw last weekend at David Sylvia's in San Jose. This was planted from a 5 gallon pot over 20 years ago.
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