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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/31/2023 in all areas

  1. Thank you! Couldn't have wished for a more destructive winter after a record-breaking summer that left most of my palms weakened already (I generally don't irrigate). I had left all my protection from the earlier freeze so I don't expect this event will be able to much more much more than I would have already lost. Unless I see temps in the 30s in the long term forecast, I do plan to take protections off next weekend and start living the Spring life. I am trying to have fun with hardscape in the meantime. Check out this little waterfall I put together with some rocks (Sabal Louisiana - always unprotected, in the back)! ~ S
    6 points
  2. What a drop in temperature going from 78° to 35° in less than 24hrs. We expect some freezing rain within the next 24hrs with a low of 30° . We aren't going to be above freezing for a whole day down here in San Antonio. For the second time this winter I covered my palms but this time , since they're all young and small I used trash bags to cover the crown and bud making sure water doesn't get inside the bud. Getting already tired of this winter. Are you guys protecting any of your palms ? My palms are still recovering from last winter storm . Wish you all luck.
    4 points
  3. Yeah, good luck Watts, more like Thurs for you guys. We'll be lucky to see barely above by then. How is the NWS so far off with this? The very day before they had DFW at barely freezing and no precip to a bloody winter storm warning this morn! My gawd, get a better forecast model, man! I grumply put on my heavy coat, gloves and insulated socks and bundled everything up ( as snot runs down nose) LOL Geez, if it's not a damn oven it's the bloody North Pole! Hang in there rest of country, The East is about to get really freakin cold. Feel sorry for any newly planted babies out East, tho it looks like Florida will be spared this time.
    3 points
  4. Jan/30/2023 4:40 PM PST Currently 12C and raining! Our high today was 17c Our low was 10c
    3 points
  5. Here’s mine. Potted in May 2020, I think that’s a 7g pot. In the ground a week or so later. And yesterday, about 2.5 years later. One of my first plantings. Gets a decent amount of sun, mostly filtered in the afternoon. The dry winter sun seems to be the worst for it. Puts out about 2 fronds per year.
    3 points
  6. I have both mulch and river rock. River rock areas do a great job of retaining moisture in summer believe it or not. And those beds are always the first to defrost after a deep freeze. Mulch does help improve the soil over time. I like both for different reasons.
    3 points
  7. Hello, I am wondering if this is a Filifera sprout and this is not anything else. Also, I added a few seeds I had in a paper towel, and I want to make sure it is not one of them I put in there. Is that a sprout? Thanks
    2 points
  8. You'd figure they'd have a better idea as to what's going to happen considering these fronts have been moving across the continent for the last couple of days. Out here they are terrible, but I think the Ocean makes it so difficult to predict what will happen when it hits landfall.
    2 points
  9. we got out freezing rain here in OKC today uggh.. and not going to be above freezing now until wednesday around noon
    2 points
  10. I'm about to go out and put some of my potted palms in the garage. I'm thinking the hardier stuff should be ok?
    2 points
  11. Like I said in your other thread Trachycarpus fortunei is the fastest trunking palm for 7b but may need protection in some years. You never answered where you are located which hampers the answer some. If you never want to protect you may need to stick with Sabal minor and Rhapidophyllum hystrix and maybe some Sabal hybrids. But again it depends exactly where in 7b you are located as to the best answer.
    2 points
  12. Yup. Even on the Big Island's east side there was a wide range of growing habitats that I just observed. On the drier side right by the Ocean's cliffs, there were Cocothrinax, Copernicia and large Encephalartos cycads growing (and the blue Encephalartos remained blue despite the rain). Just up the hill several hundred feet in elevation, were the gardens with all the tropicals we see on these pages in Tim's garden, Bill Austin's, Mike Merritt's, "Hilo Jason" (and eventually "Pepeʻekeo Jason") along with all the Leilani Estates gardens and of course Jeff & Suchin's Floribuna garden. My apologies to those I left out in that "garden name" drop. Xenon said it well, there is a habitat for everything on those rocks in the ocean, just go up or down the hill, leeward or windward side and you will find what you want in climate zones. My wife and I stayed in the Hawaiian Paradise Park neighborhood based on a lap pool (my wife wanted to be able to swim laps). Ironically right next door was a spectacular garden that showed the potential of the oceanfront East side of the Big Island for growing some things one might not expect. I peeked into but never bothered the owner who has a growing area for his more tropical plants in a wetter part of Leilani Estates I was told. An example of plants we think of as from drier habitats is shown below.
    2 points
  13. I'll chime in again here because I have quite a bit of both types, rock and wood mulch. Over the years the wood mulch areas have developed much better soil and are the only way to deal with beds where you may want densely planted beds. The rock areas I cuss at every time I want to move or plant something there because it is such a pita moving all the rocks back and forth. But if you don't plan to have many plants and/or want a more desertscape look rocks are fine. Rocks are great if you don't plan on updating or moving plants for many years. BUT I enjoy the dense planted tropical beds a lot which are not possible with rock.
    2 points
  14. Here’s mine (bottom left of shot). Starting to show its mature characteristics (recurved fronds, white crownshaft) which is nice. One of my favourites.
    1 point
  15. Yeah, guess. But there's this utube channel said the other day we were facing 10F this week and ice so atleast he was way off. BTW, this is my poor Sabal bermudana after the severe '21 freeze after I took off blankets! Recovered great but now is all burnt on most of it. I just hope it gets above freezing tomorrow, if only for a couple hours!
    1 point
  16. Absolutely, I agree. Some palms like Queen Palms have weak roots and can topple over or be uprooted in wind storms. Also CIDP's and Jubaea have large leaf canopies which are like sails in strong winds. I have seen a few CIDP's in Brookings begin to lean after weeks of heavy rain followed by very strong winds. Rocks piled around the base can help to stabilize like ballast. I put a couple ton of rocks under and around my Jubaea when they started trunking, because I was worried about them toppling in strong winds. If the look of rocks is undesired, they can be covered with thin layer of soil.
    1 point
  17. I don't understand why Sabals aren't planted more in Texas. They look amazing and seem to do very well here.
    1 point
  18. Keep 'em in a pot for 1-2 winters and let them sit outside to get used to frosts and the wet winters but put them inside if it gets too cold or if a freeze stays too long. In my experience Washingtonias can be hardened off, if grown from seeds. By keeping them in a pot first you have more control about how far you want to take it and I would also use the weed out the wimps method with these.
    1 point
  19. I haven't known this palm until recently and only because of palmtalk. I can understand why it's not the most loved city scaping palm but still it seems to be very uncommon and not appreciated enough as it seems to be very hardy in terms of drought and cold and it is nice looking palm. Plus the spines make it somewhat special. From what I've read about their habitats they are probably speeding up in summer as they grow in open hot plaines with full sun exposure.
    1 point
  20. Thank you for all the responses! Yes it is an exceptionally beautiful example of a queen palm 🌴. They really are beautiful when grown probably and they have a full crown of healthy fronds. Hoping to grow my 2 queens just as healthy.
    1 point
  21. Nice photos from Jerry's place, @Tracy. I'm quite sure he would have enjoyed showing you around. Next time! Some of you may remember @Al in Kona who passed away a few years ago. Al Bredeson could grow almost anything in his upslope south Kona garden, and he often shared his experiences with many palms and plants one might not necessarily think of as Hawaii-friendly. You may mine his excellent content here.
    1 point
  22. The high today was 54f/12.2c with 58% humidity in London today. It was sunny and the max UV was 1.1. The forecast is showing temperature is in the 50s for the rest of the week.
    1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. Yes they do. For us it is 10’ from sidewalk in. Sidewalks 8’ high clearance, 14’ for roadways. I talked to the Forman on the job today. As long as you’re within the laws and clearances, you can deny trimming as long as you call it in. After talking to the guy today he agreed to just trim the dead fronds on my caryotas, the seed pods which is a huge win, and my Bismarck seed pods. Turned out great and was free!
    1 point
  25. Currently 42F/6C at 1pm. Disgusting weather today/this week...nearly constant temperatures in the 40s day and night until the sun appears again by the weekend. Oh well, at least it isn't anywhere near freezing. Huge contrast in Texas today, with more than half of the state below freezing with widespread winter storm warnings/watches in the middle of the afternoon. Meanwhile it's in the 80s (27-28C) down in McAllen and Brownsville.
    1 point
  26. Here's my "Burle Marx" climbing a Queen palm. I would not guarantee the ID on my sample either, since it was a random eBay or Etsy purchase sometime in early 2020.
    1 point
  27. Well, two weeks after those photos they got to endure our Christmas freeze with -8 C (17 f) and 36 hours below freezing. They had a blanket thrown over them and that wall blocks direct wind from the North. Here they are today. Good regrowth from the base of all three. My small one elsewhere was close enough to the ground and had some canopy protection and looks fine. @Jadero07 I have seen specimens which much brighter red/orange flowers before, but all of mine are a dark, brick red. I am impressed yours survives the cold so well, I expect mine will freeze back to the base every few years. I had fruits developing too, so I'm happy to trade some seed next year. @Calosphace Not my Z8b freeze we just had, but I suspect they would be fine in the light freezes you might see. I'm also growing this for winter hummingbirds! If you don't have some already, I suggest tracking down some native coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens). I have several different cultivars and at least three are in full bloom right now, despite our recent freeze.
    1 point
  28. I'm always interested in trying new winter flowering plants and while this isn't exactly the most imposing specimen (yet), I noticed it was flowering for the first time today. This one is two years from seed and another two of the same age are also flowering. It was fortunately a tiny indoor seedling during Palmageddon but it suffered moderate damage during last winter's lengthy two-night freeze. I believe these can resprout from the base after fires which I'm hoping holds true in the event of a more serious freeze. This is also one of the many plants which only seem to grow for a few months of the year in spring and autumn for me, and really doesn't enjoy Houston summers when it slowly loses leaves and outer branches. Anyone else have any experience with this one or Halleria elliptica (which I'd love to find)?
    1 point
  29. I am sorry to say Nicole, that despite my excitement about using this product for 2 years straight and boasting about it to many people, it did NOTHING to help buy the degrees I needed to stave off burning up my Anonidia (Christmas) Palm, Alexandre, Dypsis dicaryi (Triangle), and Bismarck’s last year - not to mention the more tender plants I though it would help when faced with 27 - 30 degree temps here in North Florida. The first year I thought I had not applied it enough -but it was probably just that the Christmas Palms can’t handle any frost. My p. Robellini’s suffered too. So last year (winter 2021-2022) I was really diligent, timely and generous in its application. I actually was concerned from the damage my palms experienced WITH Leaf Guardian AND significant wrapping, that it may have exacerbated the leaf burn. I would never tell anyone to not try something if it looks like it would help - but Im not wasting any more money on that stuff. For what it’s worth! Good luck.
    1 point
  30. Rocks are mulch. There is organic mulching like wood chips and there is mineral mulching like gravel and such. From my experience young palms don't like rocky mulch as much as bigger ones do. I guess that's because before they've established some strong trunk it restricts their ability to do so at least a bit. Also it really looks like palms that come from rocky habitats can handle rocks even at a young age better than other palms. I have a Lava based bed where I grow mostly Californian/Mexican plants. Lava is a regional natural resource here and readily available because of it. It's radiating heat at night because of it's dark colour and it's quite porous which still provides good air exchange. Sabal uresana seems to be a palm that likes this kind of mulching already at a young age:
    1 point
  31. Jan 2023 update. Haven't protected this winter..
    1 point
  32. Wood mulch is discouraged in settings that are easily ignited from careless smokers discarded cigarette butts. I've bee using aggregate & lava rock as a mulch, no so much for that reason, but I just prefer it despite the higher cost.
    1 point
  33. Everything can be grown in Hawaii, just go up or down the volcano...dry side or wet side. There's a thread somewhere here with Hedyscepe, Pigafetta, and Cyrtostachys renda growing together in Kona near the coffee belt. There's a pic of Hawaiian Brahea and Jubaea somewhere too
    1 point
  34. I believe these are yucca growing on a live oak in Georgia.
    1 point
  35. Chinati Mountains, Ruidosa, Candelaria, Shafter, Chispa road. Etc. Yucca torreyi and elata in Texas
    1 point
  36. Yucca rostrata hybridizing with thompsoniana north of Alpine, Texas. This is the furthest north I have seen Yucca rostrata.
    1 point
  37. What I believe to be “pure” Yucca thompsoniana growing east of Fort Stockton. They are smaller than the form typically in cultivation, which hybridizes with Yucca rostrata . There is an even small dwarf form that is a hybrid with Yucca reverchonii. Neither of those species grew in this area.
    1 point
  38. With the Bottle, i needed the pot it was in so i planted it lol It had survived for a while with light freezes, it looked like garbage but i never expected it to last thru the winter. You mentioned scenic, you need to check out those pygmy dates on scenic near I-10, i posted many pictures of them from over the years from Google Maps on this thread: Hopefully your Queen survives! I see some green under the burlap-like material so theres some hope. My front yard Queen still has a green spear and appears to still be growing, albeit slowly. I also noticed something interesting the other day, one of my basjoo bananas is still trying to grow. The other one has a rotted stem though.
    1 point
  39. I live in Atlanta. Soil temps bottom out late January around 29°F according to USDA maps. The higher the bud, the higher the risk to freezing.
    1 point
  40. A nice looking Chamaerops humilis clump in a neighborhood off I-10 West in San Antonio. Only 3 of 12 trunked specimens in the clump didn't make it.
    1 point
  41. During construction you could semi-easily put in a geothermal "earth battery" and keep the inside of the structure in the high 40s to low 50s during the cold months. All that's required is some ridged foam, perforated drainage pipes, lots of gravel, an inline fan and a little research and planning. Typical you'll want to be 6' deep.
    1 point
  42. I use both mulch and rock for all the reasons mentioned above! Just today, after having returned from a long trip I noticed quite some animal 'activity' on the garden. As for diggers, we have armadillo's, squirrels, rabbits, etc... what was interesting to see is that none of the plants that had a ring of rocks around them were dug up but the areas close around it were heavily tilled. See image of a young Jubaea x Yatay that would have been uprooted were it not for the rocks (the netting construction won't stop diggers and is more intended for deer).
    1 point
  43. Rocks. Mulch blows away and washes away. Top dressing under rocks, if necessary.
    1 point
  44. Here's a Pinanga speciosa showing the dramatically beautiful purple and the huge almost drooping fronds.
    1 point
  45. Between Alaska and the Vancouver palms is a viable oceanic island off the Canadian coast the Haida Gwaii/Queen Charlotte Islands region, Graham and Moresby Islands and the largest town is Queen Charlotte city on a south facing bay. Basically solid zone 8 so it would only be pushing the cool not cold hardiness like Alaska.
    1 point
  46. Every picture I see of Sabal "lisa" be like: If you know, you know... Also, please be advised: I am not trolling anyone who likes Sabal Lisa. Im just trying to give you guys a good laugh during this "fun" year we've had. But come on..... Lisa = cynthia. Sorry, not sorry.
    1 point
  47. Surviving 20F hard frosts is zone 8a. in
    1 point
  48. Preach it! The " Foxy Lady " for those w/out many Foxy Lady options ( Cue the Hendrix ).. The thirst is real...< Cue the Joey Santore / Crime Pays, but Botany doesn't trademark Cat Call > She's a looker
    1 point
  49. The Sabal Lisa below, photographed in the wild in 2008, is the mother of most of the seeds and seedlings I sent out over the years. It is also my avatar. Sabal palmetto Lisa, Ft. Myers, 2008
    1 point
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