Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. PalmTreeDude

    PalmTreeDude

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      10

    • Content Count

      2,340


  2. mwardlow

    mwardlow

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      3

    • Content Count

      92


  3. Merlyn2220

    Merlyn2220

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      2

    • Content Count

      427


  4. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean

    IPS MEMBER


    • Points

      2

    • Content Count

      4,953



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/23/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    C. albertisianus may be the most colorful new leaf in my garden. It is almost florescent in person - with a deep hot pink-like color. A photo does not do it justice.
  2. 2 points
    That's a really nice Bizzie! I hope my two turn out like that in a few years, keeping my fingers crossed! I suspect the reason why people don't ask about the Copernicias is because they look superficially similar to common Washingtonia and Livistona. You'll probably get more comments on the Fallaensis once it gets to the absurd >6' fan size. I don't have any real show-stoppers yet, but I'm working on it! Two Bizzies, 5 Beccariophoenix Alfredii, a Fallaensis and a Baileyana, 2 Attalea Cohune, an Arenga Pinnata and a variety of big Encephalartos from PT member ChuckG. The biggest in the ground right now is this 10' tall Encephalartos Hildebrandtii, which is a bit sunburned but otherwise pretty monstrous! It dwarfs the recently planted Sylvester on it's left...
  3. 1 point
    I have a poor track record with blue pot green med fans. I killed 3 early on I'm my palm planting days. I saw this 7 gal blue pot special on the clearance rack for 30 bucks (New Center Lowe's Wilmington nc, they had a bunch more and some needles if anybody local is game) and had to try one more time. I put it on a se facing brick wall, right against the house so it is hopefully dry under the eave in the winter and can get the few degrees bump from the radiant heat. It's only planted 1/2 of the root ball depth into the existing grade, and I mounded the rest with some wood chip based garden soil in a bag. Hopefully that keeps the crown dry and and roots drained. If it survives long enough to grow and totally block the window, I'll consider that a success and deal with it then...
  4. 1 point
    I'm at Virginia Beach right now and there are some ok looking Sabal palmetto here. Especially the ones in neighborhoods away from the actual shore. There are also TONS of volunteers in the planters, some look pretty old.
  5. 1 point
    Greetings from Floribunda! We have been sprouting lots of new seeds and have an exciting collection of seedlings that have just been added to our price list, including a new round of the robust New Caledonian superstar Chambeyronia sp. 'Houailou', and the incredible circular leaved Licuala cordata. The spectacular Attalea cohune is back in stock, and more! New 4" sizes have been added as well, for plants such as Iguanura bicornis, Kentiopsis piersoniorum, Wettinia oxycarpa, and many more! The Rare & Limited section now has its own spreadsheet list, and has many new plants like Dypsis coriacea, Clinosperma vaginata, Pinanga tomentella, and Lanonia calciphila, among others. We are in the process of uploading more photos of the new items over the next week. Click here to check out the new list and type (N) in the search to filter the new items, please let us know if you have any questions. Thank you for your support!
  6. 1 point
    That is a B. Stricta, better than a normal sotol, IMO.
  7. 1 point
    I recently returned home after 2 weeks in Raleigh, NC visiting family. On my flight home, I spent hours inside Raleigh Durham International Airport (RDU) because my flight was delayed (I finally made it to FL at 2:30 a.m. the following morning). After surviving the TSA security checkpoint I was greeted by the sight of a potted group of very s-t-r-e-t-h-e-d out Adonidia merrillii (or Ptchosperma elegans?) that looked to be 15-20' tall. I had trouble deciding because they appeared distorted. A bit sad, really, that they will never know the summer heat, sun, humidity and rainfall just beyond the plate glass windows. Then again, they won't croak during winter freezes, cloudy skies and Raleigh's infamous ice storms. I called up the camera on my phone and took the following photos.
  8. 1 point
    Very nice & compact new fan unfolding:
  9. 1 point
    I thought this one looked nice as well. I took this picture at a weird angle. There is actually a lot of new fronds coming up in the middle, you just can't see them from this angle.
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    Lots more that I found... volunteers everywhere! Even in small wooded areas, and they look really healthy!
  12. 1 point
    Naturalization in progress... good stuff! Thanks for sharing!
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
  18. 1 point
    Now 16 years since germination, still in a Ø12cm x H10cm tiny plastic pot:
  19. 1 point
    Hi, I live in Keizer, Oregon Zone 8B and I there are some massive Trachycarpus fortunei around town. There is at least 1 that I know of that is much taller than the one story house that it is planted next to. It has to be probably around 25 feet tall. Even though we are listed as zone 8B I have been living here for almost 9 years and I have never seen the temperature get to 15 degrees, I think the coldest that I have seen it was 18 degrees. Trachycarpus fortunei are very common in Keizer, and also very common in Salem, Oregon which borders Keizer. In the hills of South Salem there are some large specimens of Butia capitata planted in the ground and completely exposed to the cold. I have noticed that most frost sensitive plants can take brief drops below freezing and be completely fine, but if they are exposed for long periods of freezing they get burned. Duration is a huge factor. I have had tomatoes, zucchini, peppers, and even eggplants take temperatures down to 25 degrees multiple nights and were just fine, but when they were exposed to 30 degrees for a longer period they were killed. I can say the same for Musa bajoo. Their leaves are extremely frost tender, but they were untouched when a night went below freezing for a very short period. Moisture plays a big part too, if your plant's leaves are dry they are less likely to be damaged by freezing. Frost damage on leaves is caused by moisture already present on the leaves being exposed to freezing temperatures, something as simple as a fan blowing on your plants may be effective enough to prevent frost damage depending on the situation. It will prevent moisture buildup on the leaves and thus prevent your plant from freezing. there is no water on the leaf surface at that point to freeze. Citrus growers in Riverside California have large propeller-type fans that they turn on when frosty nights are predicted and they are very effective at keeping frost from building up on the leaves. I am new to Palm Talk, this is actually my first post of any sort so I look forward to being a part of this community. I may have some knowledge to offer, but also I can learn a lot from everyone.
  20. 1 point
    Thanks guys, garden always looks better this time of year not only with the color but after I have the time to clean it up. Starting a tillandsia collection Gonzer. I hear that your bromeliad and tillandsia collection is awesome. Would love to come down and check it out sometime.
  21. 1 point
    I'm guessing my showstopper is obvious.
  22. 1 point
    Most non palm people gravitate towards a whitish bismarckia I planted in the front yard from a 5 gallon in 2011. A few like Kentiopsis O. Surprisingly, the non palm people don't ask about my copernicia fallaense and baileyana which are also in front. My cuban copernicias are still recovering from Irma, perhaps 5 more leaves each to fill out. The bismarckia was not as badly damaged and is recovered, here it is next to the street. I had 7 neighbors plant one after seeing mine.
  23. 1 point
    When I have more palm like people over I show off these tribears as they get a better understanding of what they are. I have 4 total, super fast and easy in FL if you ever find them.
  24. 1 point
    big sabal palmetto planted around 2014 taken last september. A real trooper after the 2017/2018 cold. Near downtown raleigh
  25. 1 point
    Front yard is getting its summer color. Backyard Juliette in full spike.



×