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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/17/2024 in all areas

  1. New member, but have been getting some good info from everyone on this site for a while. Started getting some palms a few years back and got inspired to start a bigger garden. In DeBary FL, about 30 miles north of Orlando. Progress so far: 2 B. Alfredii, one on the left planted from a 15g in June 2022, other went in this week from a 25g. Archontophoenix Cunninghamiana planted from a 7g in November 2021. Side yard has a couple of flamethrowers, Chambeyronia Oliviformis, another king palm, Lanonia Dasyantha, Caryota Obtusa, Chamaedorea Radicalis x Cataractarum (most likely) and Chamaedorea Microspadix. Plenty of other tropicals mixed in, big fan of Plumerias. Always run the risk of a hard freeze, but taking advantage of some high oak canopy and looking forward to a dense jungle look in a few years time.
    6 points
  2. Bizzy finally snapped out of zombie phase and is pushing a spear again. This is my survivor that made it through the last 3 polar vortexes (although I had to cut it after the previous 2). This year it went unprotected at a low of 19.8°.
    3 points
  3. Well I finally found the multi chinensis that have gone missing since Palmageddon haha. Snatched one up at ol Jimbos ! Also threw a King palm double from HGC in the ground this weekend. T J
    3 points
  4. You just never what you get with a eBay purchase but I did have some luck with these hyophorbe seeds I purchased eBay is ok sometimes but buyer beware I usually buy from known sellers that I have had good germination rates with but how do you know the first time you purchase well you don’t hence buyer beware a nice palm the spindle easy to grow and quite tough a very predictable landscape palm
    2 points
  5. Palms will sulk when being grown in a container then planted in the ground Jim is also on the money with the full sun make a wire cage place some shade cloth over the top of it which will take the pressure of your palm in the sun giving the roots time to establish after a couple of new leaves it should be fine to remove the shade cloth keep the water up to it and use seaweed extract to fertilise with
    2 points
  6. No doubt needs a pro with a crane. I would pay $700. Yup; over trimmed and underwatered. Very common in Las Vegas. Pep the hole good, don't over fertilize it at first, and lots of water.
    2 points
  7. Welcome to PalmTalk. Since you would like to keep them, you can just keep them, as is. No need to do anything.
    2 points
  8. Livistona nitida from @palmsrgreat arrived today and freshly in the ground 🙌. Going away present for myself (I'm moving to MS in 2 weeks!). Can't wait to see it's growth on my visits home
    2 points
  9. Well they are not seedlings any longer. I often hike in a valley that over 100 years ago had a lot of sugar plantation worker going deep to work on water supplys ?they must have liked avocados for lunch or snacks as there are a few dozen trees growing along the 4 mile trail. Strangely most that produce fruit produce pretty good fruit. Can't think of one w/BAD fruit. But there are some really large trees that have never had fruit that we can see. We hike the area all year and from say August to late October we pack out pounds and pounds of fruit of all kinds of shapes. Some round some pare shaped. Some a little stringy, some a little watery but worth packing on your back for miles. Back in 2015 I picked up one that had began to sprout and planted in along the trail. It's in a dry area and is now about 6' tall w/a spread of 6 feet. No sign of fruit. It can go months during the summer w/little or no water. Back in 2019 I did the same from a different tree much deeper in the valley. Today it's about 10' tall w/a spread of 6 feet. Also no sign of flowering. This one gets A LOT more rain but might go a month or two dry in the summer. Picture of this one below. Both are growing in deep shade and will probably never see direct sun.
    2 points
  10. Yeah, those sp. mayotte hybrids are ridiculously fast. Here’s one in my Hilo garden that I bought as a 4” plant about 6 years ago. It’s probably 25’ tall now. This one has the most upright form of the several of these that I have. Sorry the photos are not the best.
    2 points
  11. yeah I dont have an unobstructed view far enough from the palm to get it all in a frame without distortion. The crown is a lot wider than I expected, between 30-35 feet is a guess. Id estimate its about 30' tall.
    2 points
  12. A couple of pictures of the plants around my property where one day the garden will be expanded too a lot of the stock iam growing in my greenhouse will be planted out in the future my for one big garden makeover the more exotic varieties I have will planted in the garden around the house in the established garden iam currently exstending the taps all around my 5 acres with up to 30 taps already it’s a bit frustrating when the pump primes itself when iam not using the water trying to figure out what tap has been left on or where the leak is but without hoses no garden can be exstended so taps it is then the irrigation will be connected with climate change and drought conditions becoming more frequent irrigation is the only way to go especially in my climate
    2 points
  13. The rhapis excelsea my friend Phil gave to me needed to planted in the ground asap so with some forecast I took the opportunity to plant them around my property they can get as big as they want if I need to control them the slasher on my tractor will do just that they have come back home after 20 years when they left they were just a one leaf seedling it’s nice to see them back home having served there purpose in containers at my friends home thanks Phil they will be well looked after just like you have done
    1 point
  14. The tractor dug the hole making life easier for me rhapis will take good morning sun but bright hot afternoon sun they don’t like post a picture when you do plant it be nice to see all your recovery making good use of your time planting palms
    1 point
  15. I am in Southern California. My Chamberoynia is in the sun most of the day . It burns but looks healthy. The color is nice dark green. I planted it as a seedling and it was sheltered from the sun by a canopy of other palms . Now , 25 years later , it has outgrown the other palms and found the sun. In the summer , where I am , we have arid summers and it shows on the older fronds. It is still a beautiful palm. Yours is still very young and 3 months is nothing as at that age , it is very slow growing . It will improve after a year or two , but slowly. Harry
    1 point
  16. The Mediterranean Fan has scale. Find an insecticide and spray 3 to 4 times this summer. I didn't realize that the buggers ate Chamaerhops humilis. Scale is very aggressive on Sabal minor. The palmetto is in rough shape. It should have 6 or 7 leaves by now. Best to do now is lots of water. Was this in-ground back in December, 2022? How cold did it get at your place?
    1 point
  17. So to be honest I'm pretty partial since it's a local spot with decent prices. Is it a palm nursery not so much. Have I bought my share of palms from them yes ! If your into bromeliads and cactus/succulents then this is worth the trip. If you come up empty there one weekend stop by my house and I'll sell you some palms out of my container ranch haha I have a 25gal Royal im too chicken to put in the ground, I need to send to someone who will. T J
    1 point
  18. I just trimmed these 3 they are in more sun
    1 point
  19. Here's my White Triangle today, I'd guess about 5-6 years in the ground.
    1 point
  20. Wow 6 years only, that would be more like 12 for me. Very cool how form is so upright . That picture is shows it perfectly, thanks
    1 point
  21. Getting a Jubaeopsis further along toward becoming a palm tree. I had three seeds that germinated and one damped off. Kept in coir perlite very that seemed very dry to touch. Kept air humidity high and kept the 12” http pots on 85F degree bottom heat. Seeds from the Sullivan Jubaeopsis in Ventura.
    1 point
  22. Too much sun, Victor. It’s a juvenile and would be best situated in full to partial shade. As an adult, Flamethrowers can tolerate more sun but still look best in the shade. I have twelve of them in my Bay Area garden, all in full to partial shade except for one that’s in a sunnier position. It’s the only one that burns in the summer even though it’s been in that position for years.
    1 point
  23. Update up here in the Bay Area. My Satakentia made it through its first winter and looks good. Our lowest nighttime temperature was 35°F. Today I transferred the palm into a 5 gallon pot. Its roots are dense and were popping out the one gallon drain holes and the palm added two leaves since I got it last October. I had planned on planting it in the ground but, with this palm, I think growing it up in a five gallon pot would give it a better shot. I’ll take a picture of it in mid summer.
    1 point
  24. I think the flamethrower is getting...er...torched by the sun. Here in Florida they are not full sun palms, even with the humidity at nearly daily thunderstorms. Even with the coastal humidity in Long Beach, I think they are a shade-only palm. Hopefully some CA people can chime in and give you better info.
    1 point
  25. Pseudophoenix sargentii aztropic Mesa, Arizona
    1 point
  26. Butia. aztropic Mesa, Arizona
    1 point
  27. No, definitivamente son pseudophoenix.
    1 point
  28. Rhapis are a great palm when you given twenty plus years in the ground they become like bamboo needing to be controlled depending on where they are planted that’s why these ones will be planted out under the gum trees were I can control them with the slasher iam only propagating my variegated ones now to get them to sucker more tear the green leaf bases off at soil level mor3 pups that way
    1 point
  29. That’s more than a palm it’s an alien from from mars omg
    1 point
  30. Here are 2 of mine. My largest is too hard to get a good picture of. This one is solitary: this one is clumping: and here’s a photo with both of them: here are a couple that I bought at Chrysalidocarpus Sp. Mayotte that show that “white triangle look”. This first pic shows it’s growing so fast that’s it’s busting off fronds while still green: here’s another: and here’s my favorite of all the tristichous hybrids, Chrysalidocarpus Robustus Hybrid (most like crossed with Lanceolatus):
    1 point
  31. A nice 69F after ..what may be the final sub - 80F high for this side of 2024. After a cool-ish start tomorrow morning, the dial starts edging up heading forward. Upper 90s -at least- back on the forecast map for the weekend ahead. Will we officially crack the century mark fr the first time?? ..we'll see. Should be plenty of 100s on the board across the neighborhood stations regardless. Some lower mid 60s to start a couple mornings around the same time as well. The start of fore - summer appears to be rounding the corner..
    1 point
  32. Beautiful looking Pindo palm at Brackenridge Park in San Antonio.
    1 point
  33. Mule palms on the rise in San Antonio. Photos were taking at the entrance of the Japanese Tea Garden parking lot.
    1 point
  34. The return of the Queen palm at the Riverwalk. Planted in 2023 before winter.
    1 point
  35. Washingtonia fiifera Brahea armata Nannorhops ritchiana Chamaerops humilis "cerifiera" Sabal uresana Sabal mexicana Those are what I would try, without understanding how much cold and for how long it lasts in your area.
    1 point
  36. Do Garden beds count? 600 sq foot of garden. Lots of Tex-mex exotic looking perennials and I added two palms that I dragged across the country with me. They suffered a few months of abuse by me leading up to the move, but have recovered enough that I have decided to plant them. I do have backups still. Sabal “Riverside” acquired from @Jubaea_James760 and Syagrus romanzoffiana “Santa Catarina” from @matthedlund
    1 point
  37. I divided a clump that started getting close to a path on the side of my house. I have more of them to divide and pot on the other side of my house. They are really nice palms , and I like the look . They are expensive here even at the big box stores. Harry
    1 point
  38. I have a few clumps in my garden they are very judiciously being removed some i only leave 1 stem pruning all but the top six or so leaves they look a bit like licuala palms that way it even fooled a certain palm boffin asking me what variety of licuala it was
    1 point
  39. I am thinking about which of my palms in pots might be lucky enough to be planted on International Palm Day. If you grow only in pots you might repot one or order a palm book or seeds or buy a palm or plan a trip to a Palmetum or go on a hike to see palms or give a palm to a friend or show people how easy it is to join the IPS or bump a topic or two on PT or ask how you can help your local palm club chapter or for palm huggers post a photo (current or not) of you or someone else with a favorite palm of that moment. Feel free to post your own plans here.
    1 point
  40. The gardening , for me , is like my cycling …..Mental Floss! (Thank You Jimmy, sail on…). Fortunately , the more sensitive palms that need attention are around my house and I have been able to tend there. Peachy and Happypalms , thank you for the compliments . I’ve seen some of your palms and an inspiration to me . Most folks roll their eyes when I mention I collect palms , which is surprising to me as there are some very nice collections in my area. Yes , I need to find another orphan to adopt, there’s more room now, Harry🌴
    1 point
  41. On this day April 17 in 1794, the Father of Palms, Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius, was born. Today is International Palm Day, a day to recognize the plight of endangered palms, their fragile ecosystems, and their roles in the environment. Join us in celebrating palms!
    1 point
  42. How did this happen?? I went straight back to Lowe's, it jumped into the cart, and somehow it's in the ground within a two hour blur 😂 Say yes to your dreams guys, yes yes yes YES🤣
    1 point
  43. The John Fairey garden today.
    1 point
  44. Here are some pictures that I took in downtown San Antonio this morning.
    1 point
  45. The most recent taxonomic work reflects this, currently there is only one accepted species with highly variable morphology (appearance) correlating with a north-south cline: Washingtonia filifera. Below the species level, W. filifera var. robusta is also accepted. But really what "we're" referring to as filifera or robusta represent the two morphological/distribution extremes found in California and the southern tip of Baja California Sur. https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:267788-2
    1 point
  46. Palm trees are like Cars, Guns and Beer everyone has their personal favorites and no one will ever agree on which one is the “BEST” but we all know what we like and what we don’t like.
    1 point
  47. A BIG Mahalo Kim! Not only did you take the initiative to create and develope the IPS Newsletter, you had to also scramble to find content month after month. Not an easy undertaking and with little help. Thanks again! Tim
    1 point
  48. Ray did a terrific writeup about his interview with Libby Besse, a pioneer of early IPS days: http://online.flipbuilder.com/IPS/ghxm/
    1 point
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