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    kylecawazafla

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/18/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Went for a small hike at Crooked Lake Prairie in Babson Park, FL (just south of Lake Wales). Beautiful, endangered scrub habitat with lots of pine, scrub oak, and palmetto. Saw these unusually looking old saw palmetto throughout the trail- largest I've ever seen. I wonder how old they are. Some more typical saw palmetto throughout the trail Apparently they can branch a lot along the trunk It also looks as if the trunk can root in the ground as it grows horizontally, as this one appeared to be cut from the main stem and still growing. They looked like snakes on the ground
  2. 2 points
    Lots of Aloes blooming in the yard now. Too bag flowers don’t last longer, like some broms. And some more getting ready to bloom.
  3. 2 points
    Mine had a lean years ago. It was in a big pot in cheap commercial potting mix, and did well for many years of neglect. I didnt turn it so it grew towards the window, I think that it was turned accidentally then I noticed the tilt. Then just last year the last two leaves were smaller than normal, I think that the potting mix finally collapsed and didn't drain well. I then replaced the soil with vermiculite and little round volcanic rocks and a bit of new cheap potting mix. The closest that I could get to the now recommended fast draining mixes. The latest leaf is still small but hasn't finished growing yet I think. With 28 leaves not counting the spear, I'm pretty happy with it. Oh, and I have never fertilized it, but I might need to now.
  4. 2 points
    As someone from a state that boasts of its ancient redwoods, I have more respect now for Serenoa repens! From In Defense Of Plants: Ancient Saw Palmettos in the Heart of Florida: "Based on the rate of growth and spread, the estimated age of these clonal patches of saw palmetto range anywhere between 1227–5215 years!" http://www.indefenseofplants.com/blog/2017/1/25/ancient-saw-palmettos-in-the-heart-of-florida
  5. 2 points
    Oops forgot one! Aloe capitata
  6. 2 points
    You have to repot it if you want it growing like these ones:
  7. 1 point
    My brother and I roared on up to San Francisco and saw much that was glorious Including the Biggest Jube in town
  8. 1 point
    My backyard jungle. Forgive all the fronds on the ground, been very rainy and windy so I’m loaded up waiting for it to be dry enough for a burn. So much more to my yard but here is a taste.
  9. 1 point
    On Sunday, I was out running the off-road bike trails in the Sumter National Forest in Edgefield County, SC about twenty minutes from Augusta, Ga, and ran up on this beautiful colony of Sabal minor. Minors are actually pretty common in inundation and seepage areas in the forest, but can be found on steep slopes well away from obvious water sources. This colony was at 285' in elevation or a little less since I was up above them to take the picture. On some of the other trails, the colonies are even more extensive.
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    And his big parvifrons a male from Darold’s living room window
  12. 1 point
  13. 1 point
    @richnorm it seems that Valle de Cocora is free of cattles now and there might be some new planting going in.
  14. 1 point
    Maybe on the larger denominations? These are worth about 5 or 6 cents...total.
  15. 1 point
    Rip roaring Rhopies at SFBG.
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    How old were your metallicas when you took this picture in 1982? And are they still alive?
  18. 1 point
    And a trip to San Francisco Botanical Gardens
  19. 1 point
    I believe Mules are my favorite palm. Unfortunately I only have one. I got great deal on it, though. A landscaper in Jacksonville pulled it out of a guys yard and put it on FB Market place. I just got lucky enough to be the first to bid on it. I was surprised he sold it for just $200. I planted it last year, so it will look better this year. (the yard is in its winter stage, so it doesn't look as good as it usually does)
  20. 1 point
    Hello, This post is for the people who say you cannot grow cocos nucifera in San Diego, and perhaps in the area of Los Angeles. My climate is a little bit warmer and dryer than those areas, but not too much to make a significant difference. The secret: there is none. It is just common sense. In our region, cocos nucifera must not be planted in the native heavy clay soils, but in deep sand with some organic materials. Add to this a south face location, and you will be fine. These fotos are proof of my 12 year experiment. These fotos show the growth of my cocos nucifera planted in my factory in Tijuana, aprox 15 kilometers from the ocean, from when I planted it in 2007 to this day today 7 February 2019. 12 years. It is now a established palm that has experienced all the extended cool and cold temperatures, and heavy rain our region can receive. As you can see, it is planted in about 85% sand and 15% organic materials. It is yellow Maypan - this is what I was told when I bought it. It always has some yellow color, but has more in the cooler months. This yellow disappears every year in April. Now it is between 5 and 6 meters high, and very healthy. I put my shoe in the fotos today for comparison (thank you DoomsDave for this idea). Even now in the last part of winter it is growing new fronds as you can see in the foto, in spite of a cold winter and unusual frequent rain this year.
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    Someone else posted this link in another string on Dioons, but I thought you might find it useful: http://www.cycad.org/documents/Key-to-the-Species-of-Dioon.pdf Looking again, you are probably correct in a variety of Dioon edule. There are several varieties, some more petite with very fine leaflets, some more blue varieties, etc.
  23. 1 point
    My 2 largest sabal "lisa's". I have 2, the largest is almost 6 foot tall. $150 ea. Pickup only. Theese are very heavy.PM me if interested. Chuck G.
  24. 1 point
    That was video footage, and I can't identify the woman speaking and pointing out the crack; no idea who it might have been. Yes, I still find the lightweight chunks of tephra sitting on palm fronds and in bromeliads, but most of it has been cleaned up. The greatest measure of the palms are doing fine, but I lost several: most of my Dictyocarium lamarckianum (one remaining alive), lots of palms with very skinny trunks, such as Dypsis mirabilis and Dypsis procera, though a few survived. Lemurophoenix were quite damaged by the SO2, but they appear to be in recovery with new spears emerging. All the palms in the photo are taller now -- no ill effects at all. The response to SO2 seemed very species-specific. Reinhardtia latisecta shriveled up and died, but Hydriastele beguinii 'Obi Island' right next to them merely suffered a few brown leaves. A completely crisp and dead Medinilla magnifica was right next to a perfectly healthy Crinum lily. Some bromeliads were complete toast, while the larger Alcantarea species were fine. Leilani had an extraordinary amount of rain in 2018. The normal range is roughly 140 inches, but rain was measured at over 250 inches! The palms were happy with that. During a recent stay I made a visit to Floribunda and then planted 18 new little palms -- that was super fun. Mostly they are different species from what I lost. It was a huge thrill to be at my place, knowing what great good fortune it is to still have a wonderful tropical garden, all green again. The degree of appreciation was definitely heightened by the sea of hard lava just 2 streets away from my place.
  25. 1 point
    It was donated...can you say tax deduction?



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