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  1. Ben in Norcal

    Ben in Norcal

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/19/2019 in all areas

  1. 22 points
    Since I'm American, and Red, White, and Blue are our colors - this grouping is apropos. But nice to look at for any nationality.
  2. 13 points
    Darold’s house with large Hedyscepe canterburyana out front.
  3. 12 points
    I've been growing palms in the ground here in the piedmont of NC for nearly 20 years and have tested all possible species and variants (and sizes) that money can buy. My observations about Sabals, Washys and others from my locale are as follows. (I did not want to hijack an existing thread.) This doesn't mean that you would get these same results in another 7b...there are too many factors that affect long-term viability (microclimates, health of the plant, management of the plant, winter wetness, winter harshness, protection methods, etc.). All of my first set of comments are about palms that were not protected during NC winters. I do believe that a lot of my failures were due to the plant being too small too put into the ground and face NC winters. I list my other failures, too. BTW, after trying and failing to grow palms for this long, you'd think I would cringe at the thought of trying another one. Not really, but I have expanded my interest into yuccas and agaves, which require no winter protection. :-) (Sorry for the long read.) SABALS: SABAL PALMETTO. This is a native palm for North Carolina, i.e., the coast. However, inland, they were not long-term (for me), as much as I wanted them to be. I've grown up seed from the coastal sabals and put seedlings directly into the ground, purchased 5 gal sizes to put directly into the ground, and purchased at least a dozen of fully grown hurricane-cut ones, i.e., generally they were from Florida. For the seedlings and the juvenile ones, all succumbed to winter's madness eventually (max 3-5 yrs). For the large hurricane-cut ones, I got at least 7-8 years out of them before all but one died. (I've moved so I don't know if that survivor is still alive today.) SABAL MINOR. Long-term survivor and turns weedy, i.e., it produces hundreds of seeds that all seem to germinate. (Doesn't seem to matter the geographical origin) Next thing you know, you have hundreds of seedlings crammed together. I stopped planting Minors and have none at my current residence on purpose. SABAL X-BRAZORIENSIS While I have had managed to kill a few, in general could be long-termers in a better microclimate than mine were. These get really big fast and take up a large space. SABAL 'BIRMINGHAM'. This palm, regardless of what size when placed in the ground, has been a long-termer for me. I've moved them repeatedly, ignored them, never watered them, and yet they continue to grow and prosper. They will eventually trunk up but do so at a snail's pace. I have at least a half dozen of these (seedling size) in my front yard today and will not protect them. They need 3 years (like most palms) before they start getting really pretty and robust. SABAL MEXICANA. I love the look of this sabal and wanted them to grow here, even if by magic. I flunked trying to keep these alive, whether large-ones directly from Texas or smaller. I could get about 3-4 years out of them before they floundered. I had trunk rot every time. SABAL RIVERSIDE. I have tried several of these and they are promising. Who would've thunk?! I don't protect them and they do get winter damage but can pull out of it. Any long-termers (5+ yrs) out there??? I killed my largest because I had to transplant it. Sabals do not like to be moved. However, one of my transplants is at my current home and is picking up where it left off. Time will tell. SABAL 'LISA'. I had a nice-sized one (10-15 gal) growing probably 4-5 years (no protection) and it was healthy. Had to transplant it, and it hated me for that and bit the dust. I will be trialing another that I am growing up in a pot in a few years. I'll mention the other Sabals I've trialed both protected and unprotected with zero success for even short or long-term or teenage years survival. There are a few more that I've not tried and will not. Burmudana. Short timer. Causiarum. Short-termer. Domingensis. Short-timer. Etonia. For me, couldn't keep them alive, but others in my area have had better success. Pumos. 2 years max.(protected) Rosei. 3 yrs max (protected) Uresana. 4-5 years. This palm is very pretty. Not protected. Miamiensis. 2-3 yrs. WASHYS FILIFERA. Good for a couple of years while they were small and the crown is underground. Difficult to find large plants that might survive or that were pure filifera, so my tests were only of 1-5 ga. sizes. None survived more than 3-4 years for me. Was sold many "pure" ones the turned out to be not true. ROBUSTA. Fun to play with. All of mine, varying sizes when planted, perished quickly...1-3 yrs max. FILIBUSTA. Without winter protection, did not last long. However, I managed to protect one for nearly 10 years, (started it as a seedling) and it grew quickly (9-10' tall and giant leaves). I could no longer get a canopy over the thing, and it perished after the following winter. Made me nearly cry. MISC. KEEPERS NEEDLE. Of course these are long-termers. Just visit JC Raulston aroboretum in Raleigh to see a survivor from the 80's. These are darn-finicky if thrown into the ground as a seedling. I've killed more needle palms because they were too small than I want to remember. OTHER PALMS I'VE TRIED AND FAILED BUTIA CAPITATA (I forget the new name for this.). I managed to keep one alive for about 8 years before it mets its demise. I've watched butias grown around this area. Not many seem to have made it long-term, even ones that I thought may have been 10 yrs old. I'm not sure if the one in downtown Raleigh parking lot is still kicking or not. That one is growing in the middle of a paved parking lot. Anyone know? CHAMAEROPS HUMULIS. I wanted so badly to make these live, but wishing for it didn't make it happen. I've probably tried several dozen of varying sizes. Max of 3 years with no protection. Maybe it's just me...... NANNORHOPS RICHTIANA. None of the dozen or so I've planted became long-termers. I did get more than a few years from each one trialed. I gave one to a friend and that one is still alive. (go figure). Mine were protected. SERENOA REPENS. Why of why can't I keep these alive. (sounds like a song..) No long-terms for me with and without protection. TRITHRINAX CAMPESTRIS. Tried varying sizes. Had a beautiful large one, put in a desert bed, covered it to keep moisture out, ..dead in 2 years. CHAMEDOREA MICROSPADIX or RADICALUS. Not sure what I've been doing wrong, but some friends have managed to keep theirs alive longer than a few years. PALMS I SHOULDN'T BE GROWING BUT AM STUBBORN 1. JUBAEA CHILENSIS. I am down to one jubaea, but it is a beauty (see my thread about NC jubaea). This palm gets covered and added supplemental heat each winter. I only turn the heat on when the weather is expected to drop below 15f. The leaves on a jub definitely will take single digits without browning out. Added heat keeps the palm at least 15 if we go into single digits. I have killed at least 2 dozen of these....... You can not plant out a seedling or even a 5 gal and expect them to live (even with protection). They have to be grown up to a larger size before planting. 2. JUB x BUTIA. Leaves are cold tolerate like it's dad. Needs protection. 3. BUTIA X JUB. Leaves are not cold tolerate, more like it's mom. Pretty palm. I don't know of anyone keeping these alive in z7 without protection. Mine will someday be too large to protect. I think the one at Gary's Nursery (z8) may still be alive, not sure about its age, but definitely more than 5 yr.
  4. 11 points
    JxS fattening up big time...now trunking.
  5. 11 points
    OK, Tim, just took a pic with the 5-gaL orange bucket. The larger one on the left produced a small inflorescence a year ago. A couple of fruits partially developed, but were not viable. I need to fertilize. Fortunately, I mowed this section only yesterday. Background facts: seeds from RPS sowed July 2010, two juvenile plants planted out in a full sun location from 2-gal buckets in Nov 2012. I suspect my palms will never catch up with Tim's great- looking ones, but they seem to be keeping pace.
  6. 10 points
  7. 10 points
    Here are some photos of one of the last 2 Coconut Palms that a local nursery had, so I donated one of them to a local park, Douden Park on North Padre Island, Corpus Christi, Texas. It is at approximately 27.7N latitude in a solid Zone 10 A Climate, but a cool 10 A Climate with average highs/lows in January of about 64F/52F, but it warms up quickly here in March and April. It is a little over 8 ft. tall in overall height, with a trunk diameter at its base of about 6.5 inches, and about 1.5 inches of woody trunk starting to form at its base. Initially, I thought it was a Golden Malayan Dwarf, but the petioles don't have the true golden orangish color of the Golden Malayan, yet aren't green enough to be a Green Malayan, so maybe one of your Coconut Palm experts (like Zeeth-Keith in Florida) can chime in and help me out with id ing it. The local nursery that occasionally sells them, gets them from Florida, if that helps. Thanks to John Srubar, a fellow Flour Bluff, Corpus Christi resident and Dave Dunseath, a Padre Island resident for help in planting, staking, and watering it. John
  8. 10 points
    I took over the garden way back in 2006 ( I think) but I think I decided to turn it into a Palm Garden in around 2010. I like the way the garden is taking shape. The "canopy palms" are beginning to look the way I was imagining them, I just need them to create the shadier micro-climates for all the under-story palms too.
  9. 10 points
    One of Darold’s large Geonoma undata.
  10. 10 points
    Monster P tor tor...with oddly tiny flower!
  11. 9 points
    Just had the chance to explore some of the mainland Nikau Habitat on the West Coast of the South Island, and collect some seed. Never spent much time looking into this palm in habitat but it's incredible the variation depending on location, above/below canopy, and distance to the coast. Underneath the canopy they spread very wide, almost like Coconut or bangalows... there was many with green fronds below horizontal. After getting above canopy they turn into the typical shuttlecock shape. Also amazing to see hundreds of seedlings like grass around some really old ones in the forest. Enjoy..
  12. 9 points
    Here are some photos of my Corpus Christi, Zone 10A Coconut Palms. The first one I think is a Maymex Hybrid cross between a Golden Malayan Dwarf and a Mexican Tall. The second one is what I think is a pure Mexican Tall. They were both sprouted from nuts collected off the beach at North Padre Island here back in 2016. The Maymex Hybrid is about 2.5 years old (it sprouted in November 2016) and has big robust leaves and the trunk is about 6.5 inches in diameter at the base (hybrid vigor), and is about 7.5 ft. tall in overall height with no signs of transplant shock-growing like a weed! The Mexican Tall is 3 years old (sprouted in the summer of 2016) and has about 6 inches of trunk diameter at the base, and is about 7 ft. tall in overall height, also with no signs of transplant shock and growing like a weed. My wife helped me plant both of them the end of March, then a few days later around April 1st, we had a strong very unusual late season cold front blow through in which the temp in my yard in the middle of the afternoon was only 46.5F when it should have been about 76F that time of day! This didn't even really seem to effect them, as I had hardened them off to several nights of lows from 33F to 39F with no protection, and I like to expose my young Coconut Palms to a little frost too before putting them in the ground. This really seems to help harden them off for planting in marginal climates for them, like my climate. Also, I no longer plant any younger Coconut Palms under7 ft. tall in my climate because the younger ones just have too hard of a time making it through our winters. The last palm is my big Green Malayan Dwarf that has been in the ground for 3 years and 3 winters. The first two winters here were bad winters for this area (got down to 27.2F one morning and 28.5F the next morning in Jan. 2017). That winter I wrapped it in a blanket all the way around the trunk from ground level up to the lower leaves in the crown, but just in the blanket on the coldest nights. Then, the second winter, I wrapped it in small incandescent Christmas lights, NOT the LED ones because they give off no heat. Then I wrapped the blanket around the Christmas lights. But I only wrapped the blanket around it on the nights it was predicted to get down to freezing. That winter, we had 6 freezes, 3 of which were from 28.5F to 29.9F, which is very rare for my area, as my yard normally doesn't get below about 33.0F on the coldest morning of the winter. This last winter was so mild, I didn't have to protect it at all. We got down into the 30'sF 5 or 6 times this past winter from 33F to 39F, which is pretty much normal here. It is about 12.5 ft. tall in overall height and has about 22 inches of woody trunk height and 9 inches of trunk width at its base (it would have more trunk and be more robust if it hadn't been neglected at the local nursery I bought it from and was penciling at the top of its trunk). I nursed it back to health and is really growing now. Oh, also in early December 2017, the winter in which it got hit by 6 freezes total, it was exposed to a very rare snowstorm here with temps of 31.8F totally unprotected. It had 3.5 inches of snow on it, but didn't even look very phased at all because I grow everything 100% ORGANICALLY and that strengthens tropical trees and plants and adds some degree of cold hardiness to them. It wasn't predicted to get that cold that night or for us to have anything more than flurries, but there it was unprotected, and none the worse for it; probably helped strengthen it up some. John P.S. They look even better now. These were pics back in late March, when I planted the first two. I will post updated photos in a few months, that will show significant progress.
  13. 9 points
    We were going to get King palms and just “baby” them as suggested by someone else who lives nearby that has them. We changed our minds and decided to go with cold hardy instead. We planted the first of three today! We planted this Butia ourselves which was a huge mistake. The owner of the nursery didn’t seem to think it would be too hard of a job for a few people. I should have considered that he works with people who do this daily for a living. It took five men to get it out of our truck to our back yard. From there, my husband, our son, and I fought with it all day. So thankful and relieved that it’s finally in! Luckily the other two are much lighter Mules that we can actually lift up! I’ll post more pics as we get everything in! I’ve been lurking here for a while now as I did my research on what I wanted. Looking forward to learning from everyone and being a part of this community!
  14. 9 points
    Riley with the Hedyscepe and a Howea belmoreana our front.
  15. 9 points
    P sunkha now self seeding.
  16. 8 points
    Hedyscepe with seed cage to deter vermin!
  17. 8 points
    And a fat S uresana and little S “Riverside” to round things out!
  18. 8 points
    BxP getting vert.
  19. 8 points
    Pictures from the archive. Most but not all bit the dust after transplanting or a mean winter. Looking at these reminded me of what sizes they were and how quickly they grew. Phoenix theophrastii. One of two twins grown from seed. Trithrinax campestris Brahea Clara after winter clara in bloom Brahea armata Chamaeorops in front Butia capitata grown from a 3 gal plant. At about year 7, it became too big to protect although we tried. Was probably after the first unprotected winter that it passed into palm heaven. Washy prior to being moved. Moved to next location. Dead in one year after. Nannorhops Sabal Lisa. The size is deceiving. Trachycarpus "Greensboro". I swear that this is the hardiest of the fortuneiis...on par with "Bulgaria". I never cut leaves off unless they have no green left on them. Didn't have to cut much on this one. I miss this palm. It should be still alive at the old homestead. Grown from a tiny seedling put directly into the ground! Sabal "Bald Head island" giant. From this photo it looks like BHI palmetto, but it could just be a giant BHI minor. I forget. normal Palmetto. Of all the palmettos grown, this one was still alive when we moved. It was the fattest one (hurricane cut) of the bunch when I picked it out. No protection. Another hurricane cut Florida palmetto. (in the background) Dead in about 6-7 years. Two palms from PDN planted when they were strappers. On the left is Sabal minor "McCurtain"--possibly the slowest growing palm on earth.... and the right is Sabal palmetto " Tifton". Both were alive when I moved and left them there. And finally (am all photo'd out), this is what my washy filibusta once looked like before............. this.......... complete and total collapse....... ..still searching for my other sabals..... Birminghams today....starting over with a circle of 6.
  20. 8 points
    Slowly digging into many archives of photos...... Here is another palm I forgot about and not in the list above, Brahea decumbens. I paid a pretty penny for this and it grew wonderfully. Covered in the winter. Seemed to love our hot summers. As with everything else, when I moved, everything got transplanted. I think this was m ySabal bermudana...... perhaps someone can ID it. Here is a Trachycarpus 'Naga Hills" with silver backside. This one never really liked me. No protection. It barely grew more than 1 or 2 leaves a year. Not sure what the cause of its discontent was. Soil? Sun? Temps? Winter? My filibusta while young. Grew it up from a seedling. Tony Avant (Plant Delights) came to see my palms.(2010) He was surprised by the diversity......(before we moved). more pics to come later....
  21. 8 points
    Say no more! Clockwise from the top: Loba, Zorro, Akela, and Rua. My gardening buddies
  22. 8 points
    Been awhile since B. condapanna has been on the board, so I thought I'd revisit the topic. Lucky here in Hawaii as these palms are fast, robust, and rather trouble free. Acquired seed back in 2010 and started planting 1 gallons back in 2012. There are seven in this grouping, some planted at a later date. They've been flowering for awhile now, but no seed yet. Here are a few photos, mostly looking up at them these days. I remember seeing promising photos of specimens in Calif., so feel free to post updates. Also, how bout some photos....Kim, Jason, 'Orange Bucket Mike'? Tim
  23. 7 points
  24. 7 points
    Hemithrinax ekmaniana - 25g Asking $750 Pickup in Ft. Lauderdale preferred although local delivery can be arranged. John Light 954-903-8061
  25. 7 points
    Bonus Photo: Sabal palmetto Lisa



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