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medemia


luke.m

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Medemia seed germinated like little rockets, all together. Ive taken a shot and put them straight in the ground in deep sand just over 2months ago and we are coming into the begining of autumn in south west WA. They've def got a good hold in the ground, been a warm dry summer by our standards giving roughly weekly deep watering. im hoping to see some leaves soon. Wondering if any of you palmos can share experience with direct sowing medemia, cheers

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On 3/17/2024 at 11:40 PM, luke.m said:

Medemia seed germinated like little rockets, all together. Ive taken a shot and put them straight in the ground in deep sand just over 2months ago and we are coming into the begining of autumn in south west WA. They've def got a good hold in the ground, been a warm dry summer by our standards giving roughly weekly deep watering. im hoping to see some leaves soon. Wondering if any of you palmos can share experience with direct sowing medemia, cheers

I sowed mine from Thai seed. Once they sprouted I planted them in full sun. They grew 1 leaf, looked good until severe wet weather killed them all. Not sure if it was the soil (draining clay) or what. 

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15 hours ago, KrisKupsch said:

I sowed mine from Thai seed. Once they sprouted I planted them in full sun. They grew 1 leaf, looked good until severe wet weather killed them all. Not sure if it was the soil (draining clay) or what. 

Unless your microclimate is rather cold, I am surprised. I thought NSW has a subtropical, cobsiderably warmer climate than my own local one. Here a Medemia still survives.  I did not write thrives, just survives or more probably goes through a very slow permanent decline. This sp really hates cool and moist together, but I was under the impression that most rainfall in NSW occurs during the warm season, a very big advantage. Here it suffers more during winter, when protected (rise of air humidity) than when left with unimpeded air flow. I have the suspicion that if you correct such horticultural details (clay soil is surely one), you may have good chances for a successful cultivation.

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I didn't start with seed, but I did try a seedling once. I gave it the fastest draining soil I had in a deep, 2-gal. pot and kept it as dry as I could. It grew on for a while, roots easily hitting the bottom of the pot and it put on one leaf at a time. It grew ok, albeit super slow. After a year plus, it declined into the next summer and then poof, gone. 

I would try the species again, as I know others here have done better with Medemia in containers. I have seen a handful of them thriving in larger pots. I theorize they have a rough time as seedlings and if you can get them past that stage, they do much better. I would use a deeper pot, a different mix and completely keep it away from rain; like potentially as in a polyhouse or glasshouse setting. Perhaps even with subirrigation from the bottom-up to keep the plant dry. I can't do much about the humidity though... 

 

- Fun side note: A while ago, about early 2000s, a large Medemia showed up for auction during the holiday party for the South Florida Palm Society. It was a healthy, attractive, well-grown plant (total eye candy) in a 10-gallon pot holding a nice array of bright white, thinly divided fan leaves. It had no tag, no one described it or took ownership for bringing it in and thus no one knew what it was. Naturally, the numerous palm fanatics in attendance circled around it, trying to figure it out. M. argun was unknown in cultivation then and most didn't even know the genus, unless you were a particular nerd with a copy of Genera Palmarum who had memorized all the palm genera (cough).

Among the clinking of the beer bottles and wine glasses, someone in the back murmured 'It kinda looks like a weird Bismarck.,,' and it hit me. I turned and slowly snuck away. I could not hold my expression well and one esteemed veteran of the palm world saw my reaction and followed me to the dessert table... "YOU know what it is dontya?" I just smiled and filled my face with key lime pie. I thought that if no one would knew what it was I could perhaps nab it with a low bid. Well, it didn't work. The mystery drove the price up and it sold for a bundle. Did I inform the new owner? I don't remember as I was annoyed my plan didn't work, plus the event was crowded, loud and boisterous with crazy palm people and rapid auction after auction. Good times. 

I still don't know where it came from, but the auctions in those days were known for bringing in the super rare and virtually unknown species.

Ryan

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South Florida

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3 minutes ago, Palmarum said:

Well, it didn't work. The mystery drove the price up and it sold for a bundle. Did I inform the new owner? I don't remember as I was annoyed my plan didn't work, plus the event was crowded, loud and boisterous with crazy palm people and rapid auction after auction. Good times. 

Even with no mystery, the seedlings sell for $50 a pop at our meetings when I bring them.

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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5 minutes ago, kinzyjr said:

Even with no mystery, the seedlings sell for $50 a pop at our meetings when I bring them.

I will need to get another one day... the urge is too great. For the science, and for the palm of course.

Ryan

South Florida

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For those experiencing issues with these once they go in the ground, I have had luck getting them to recover by putting them in bonsai mix in a pot and watering with rain water only.  They do not care for our municipal water.

21 minutes ago, Palmarum said:

I will need to get another one day... the urge is too great. For the science, and for the palm of course.

Ryan

I have one still getting by out in the yard, but it will probably have to be babied to make it.  If I get another RPS seed order of these, I'll share after they germinate.  They typically only take 2 weeks with bottom heat.

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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On 3/22/2024 at 11:07 PM, Palmarum said:

I will need to get another one day... the urge is too great. For the science, and for the palm of course.

Ryan

I have another 10 seeds from Tobias arriving any day now, couldn’t help it…with a good smattering of other sp.

Palm growing is I think the healthiest addiction I’ve attempted, good fun. 

As we are sliding into autumn Im thinking of getting crafty and knocking up  some custom eeextra deep pots with some pipe material with a very free draining mix to over winter these ones in the hot house, I’ll get em. 

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I got about a dozen Medemia seeds from a German source (not RPS) in Feb. of this year and today I'm seeing some interesting developments that I hope indicates germination is underway (after several weeks of waiting).

When I first got the seeds I soaked them in water for a couple of days, rubbed off most of the soft smooth coating with sandpaper and then placed them on a bed of damp sphagnum moss in a plastic container that was on a germination heating pad.

Once I know for certain which ones are developing, I'll put some in deep tree pots and others directly in the ground outside. Fingers crossed!🙂

Medemia1.png

Medemia2.png

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On 3/24/2024 at 12:12 PM, Hillizard said:

I got about a dozen Medemia seeds from a German source (not RPS) in Feb. of this year and today I'm seeing some interesting developments that I hope indicates germination is underway (after several weeks of waiting).

When I first got the seeds I soaked them in water for a couple of days, rubbed off most of the soft smooth coating with sandpaper and then placed them on a bed of damp sphagnum moss in a plastic container that was on a germination heating pad.

Once I know for certain which ones are developing, I'll put some in deep tree pots and others directly in the ground outside. Fingers crossed!🙂

Medemia1.png

Medemia2.png

At least two of these seeds have put out a taproot today, so I know what I'll be potting up tomorrow! Forecast is for cooler weather for the next week or so, so I won't be testing these in-ground outside. Later in spring I'll try that with any future sprouts.

Medemia3.png

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On 3/22/2024 at 10:10 PM, Phoenikakias said:

Unless your microclimate is rather cold, I am surprised. I thought NSW has a subtropical, cobsiderably warmer climate than my own local one. Here a Medemia still survives.  I did not write thrives, just survives or more probably goes through a very slow permanent decline. This sp really hates cool and moist together, but I was under the impression that most rainfall in NSW occurs during the warm season, a very big advantage. Here it suffers more during winter, when protected (rise of air humidity) than when left with unimpeded air flow. I have the suspicion that if you correct such horticultural details (clay soil is surely one), you may have good chances for a successful cultivation.

Down to 5C. 

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