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Drone video of Naturalized Phoenix Canariensis & Washingtonia habitat on the Cliffs in Santa Monica


GMann

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Here is my latest drone video from the cliffs overlooking the ocean in Santa Monica, California. The park on top of the cliff is called Palisades Park. Phoenix Canariensis (Canary island Date Palm) and Washingtonias were first planted here over 100 years ago, since then seeds have fallen down the cliffs and tons of Phoenix Canariensis and Washingtonia palms have grown up there, creating a naturalized habitat.

The latitude and climate are very similar to the Canary Islands: a dry, Mediterranean/semi-desert, maritime climate. And the cliffs are reminiscent of the steppe volcanic slopes of the Canary Islands where the Phoenix Canariensis originates. And Washingtonias are California natives anyway, though their natural range is not on the coast.

Enjoy:

 

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1 hour ago, GMann said:

Here is my latest drone video from the cliffs overlooking the ocean in Santa Monica, California. The park on top of the cliff is called Palisades Park. Phoenix Canariensis (Canary island Date Palm) and Washingtonias were first planted here over 100 years ago, since then seeds have fallen down the cliffs and tons of Phoenix Canariensis and Washingtonia palms have grown up there, creating a naturalized habitat.

The latitude and climate are very similar to the Canary Islands: a dry, Mediterranean/semi-desert, maritime climate. And the cliffs are reminiscent of the steppe volcanic slopes of the Canary Islands where the Phoenix Canariensis originates. And Washingtonias are California natives anyway, though their natural range is not on the coast.

Enjoy:

 

Really great video, beautiful palms and such beautiful views. There are at least a dozen or so royal palms planted throughout the park, and there is a massive, very healthy looking one visible at 2:11 on the left side of the street. You can also see some smaller ones at 2:48 along the path and several other times in the video. Love the work you do with the palmy drone footage, thanks for sharing!

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Fantastic video. Thanks for sharing here! 

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Jim in Los Altos, CA  SF Bay Area 37.34N- 122.13W- 190' above sea level

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Is that a non-cunninghamiana Archontophoenix on the left at 3:51, right when the music gets a lot better?

Edited by awkonradi
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Andrei W. Konradi, Burlingame, California.  Vicarious appreciator of palms in other people's gardens and in habitat

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21 hours ago, Alex High said:

Really great video, beautiful palms and such beautiful views. There are at least a dozen or so royal palms planted throughout the park, and there is a massive, very healthy looking one visible at 2:11 on the left side of the street. You can also see some smaller ones at 2:48 along the path and several other times in the video. Love the work you do with the palmy drone footage, thanks for sharing!

Yes there are some Braheas and Howeas down there too. But my favorite are those huge Phoenix Canariensis. They all seem to be in great health, no sign of pests like the ones that have decimated the Canarys in Europe. And some of them are so tall! I am pretty sure they just dont get that tall here in Florida. Not sure if it's because of the climate, the hurricanes, or simply because they have been in California for longer than in Florida? I hope it's the former because that would mean we will eventually get to see them that tall here too. One of my neighbors at my old house in Hollywood, Florida had a pretty big one but when I recently passed through that neighborhood it was gone 😒probably lost in one of those tropical storms we've been having...

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Great video! I love how drones give us a vantage point previously unseen. This reminds me of a much smaller naturalized 'grove' of CIDP's along the freeway on the Oakland Emeryville border. They completely dominate the smaller planted trees (I'm guessing Podocarpus or something), which makes me wonder why cities don't just lean into the palm effect and plant more CIDP + Washies + Braheas etc. Anyways cool video to start the day.

Canaries in Emeryville.png

More CIDP's.png

Edited by Jadd Correia
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Looks like robustas. I'm more in awe of the 100+ year old filiferas planted when CA was young and when Hollywood was in its infancy.

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Really awesome vid! Drones are game changer... too bad some people abuse it and now they're kinda hated. lol Now go to Woodland Hills and film the Jubaeas :D 

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19 hours ago, jgi27 said:

Really awesome vid! Drones are game changer... too bad some people abuse it and now they're kinda hated. lol Now go to Woodland Hills and film the Jubaeas :D 

Now I am intrigued. What is the approximate address for these Jubaeas?

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13 hours ago, GMann said:

Now I am intrigued. What is the approximate address for these Jubaeas?

I believe these are them, along Topanga Canyon Blvd. A grove containing many massive Jubaea and some Jubaea x Butia hybrids, as well as some other cool palms. Very impressive collection!

https://www.google.com/maps/@34.1771025,-118.6050977,3a,29.9y,28.8h,94.63t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1scYC_xZ6Q0E4AWJrk5PRUMw!2e0!7i16384!8i8192?entry=ttu

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image.thumb.png.2bc9ff4fab992d943be55516dd54ffc9.png

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2 hours ago, GMann said:

Nice. Thanks!

No problem! Any excuse to do some palm sleuthing is always a good one! And yeah some tall Brahea and Livistona in there plus this big Sabal, not sure what it is.

image.thumb.png.2439cfaacba0707defb97cd33c5c8405.png

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On 6/26/2023 at 4:25 PM, awkonradi said:

Is that a non-cunninghamiana Archontophoenix on the left at 3:51, right when the music gets a lot better?

That part at the end is just a preview of my Venice Beach Drone video, which you can watch in full here:

https://odysee.com/@PalmSavanna:9/VeniceBeach:f
 

The palm you are talking about maybe is Rhopalostylis sapida (Nikau Palm from New Zealand) there are actually 2 of them in a garden on the left side of the canal, here is a screenshot from the full length video for a better look:

VeniceSnapshot.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...

I work around this area in BH. There's a long stretch of road with uninterrupted palm trees and I've always thought about flying a drone through it and filming it. Starts here:

https://www.google.com/maps/@34.0708173,-118.3795761,3a,83.2y,176.84h,105.49t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1si98Kjexnn4cY4kY5HpCP6w!2e0!7i16384!8i8192?entry=ttu

Once you pass Wilshire Blvd, it turns into alternating CIDP's and Washingtonias:

1.JPG

2.JPG

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