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What kind of fruit is this?


bubba

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Is it edible and does it taste good? Where does it come from? Thank you.

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What you look for is what is looking

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1 hour ago, bubba said:

Is it edible and does it taste good? Where does it come from? Thank you.

It is edible. The pulp is yellow, sweet and creamy. It is eaten row, in milkshake, in ice creams and in cakes. 

It comes from Central America and Northern South America. 

It is sold in Andalucia. 

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Nice find. It is also known as Eggfruit, as the fresh pulp will kinda resemble scrambled eggs in texture. The fruit on the tree in the photo are still undersized. They could/should reach baseball or softball size.

As @gurugumentioned above, it is a tasty, creamy fruit. It is different if you are not used to it, like a very sweet, whipped yam. I have tried the fruit in milkshakes and it is excellent. Some of the recipes were made with vanilla ice cream or just milk, others with a touch of cinnamon. I am sure other variations exist. I haven't found the fruit in other confections or baked goods as of yet, but I would try them if I could.

Like most species in Pouteria, the trees can become massive overtime, but a trimmed specimen kept at 15 ft. by 15 ft. (4.5m) will provide a ton of fruit. There are many trees in tropical fruit collections around S. Florida. A former coworker of mine would bring me fruit from her tree regularly. Harvested fruit ripen very fast and are better if taken from branch instead of off the ground. There are hints of different cultivars out there but I have not seen them in person. Small plants show up regularly at fruit tree sales and sometimes at other plant events. Many of them are grown from seed, but others may be grafted to either get a 'faster fruiting tree' or to preserve a unique healthy, large fruiting, tasty specimen.

Ryan

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South Florida

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I've tried this Pouteria in the Keys and didn't care for it...tasted like a pasty, chalky hard-boiled-egg-yolk. But I'm assuming there are "good" and "bad" versions, just as with sapodilla, which can be highly grainy to almost smooth in texture. Pouteria is in the Sapotaceae, kin to the Mamey Sapote and it make sense what others have said above, for a good cultivar, prepared in ice cream, etc. When I first tried Mamey (I had never seen it before I moved to the Keys) I thought the same thing as I did with that eggy Pouteria...but this time, pumpkin! (and it is an excellent pumpkin substitute). But I started using it in smoothies and found myself suddenly a fan of it. So you never know with some of these unusual tropical fruits...but I do think that Pouteria is a very pretty tree.

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Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 287 ft | z10a | avg Jan 43/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899); previously Los Angeles, California (multiple locations)

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