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Aloe offspring parents uncertain


Tracy

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I have several Aloe species that have been flowering for the past few years and am now getting volunteers popping up in my front planter.  Most have been easy to identify as Aloe microstigma.  The one below though has grown bigger, with wider leaves.  It is also possible that it is a hybrid of one of my many Aloes.  Due to size, I suspect that it could have Aloe ferox, Aloe marlothii or Aloe africana in it's lineage.  It seems bigger than the other Aloes I have that set seed.  For now I'm just watching it, but plan to pull it out and drop it into a pot before deciding it's ultimate fate.  I suspect that it will grow to be too large next to the Pseudophoenix and be a distraction or even grow into it's trunk.  Any thoughts from the gallery as to what you think it looks like?

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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Just a wild guess, but it resembles Aloe broomii

Hi 56˚, Lo 42˚ light showers

 

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Casas Adobes - NW of Tucson since July 2014

formerly in the San Carlos region of San Diego

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Just a wild guess, but do you think it could be microstigma x marlothii hybrid? The little spines on both sides of the leaves rings of marlothii, but the leaf shape looks reminiscent of microstigma.

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11 hours ago, msporty said:

Just a wild guess, but do you think it could be microstigma x marlothii hybrid? The little spines on both sides of the leaves rings of marlothii, but the leaf shape looks reminiscent of microstigma.

Definitely in the realm of possibility, as they aren't too far apart.  I also have Aloe ferox which has a bloom time overlapping with the microstigma, as well as the Aloe africana which had an overlapping bloom.  My neighbor across the street also has a large hedge of what I believe are Aloe arborescens which could have been involved with one of the larger species too.  I have a lot of Aloe microstigma 1st, 2nd and now third generation in my garden (2nd and 3rd gens in photo below). 

As far as proximity goes, Aloe africana and microstigma were the closest in proximity, with the marlothii a little further away, and the ferox even further around on my side yard as opposed to front.

13 hours ago, Tom in Tucson said:

it resembles Aloe broomii

Tom, I can see the similarity in appearance but since I don't have this species or know of any growing nearby, it is out of the running as a volunteer in my garden.  I have a lot of other smaller Aloe species that could have donated pollen, but I've basically ruled them all out due to appearance and size.

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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Tracy, what is the pollination vector,  hummingbirds ?   Perhaps physical proximity is not so important.  

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San Francisco, California

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17 hours ago, Darold Petty said:

Tracy, what is the pollination vector,  hummingbirds ?   Perhaps physical proximity is not so important.  

Humming birds and bees are very active on all the Aloe flowers.  Good point.  I also spread some seed from my Aloe speciosa in this planter, just to add to the list of the larger species involved.  On the smaller species I left off Aloe elgonica as a possibility in the mix.  There are definitely some features similar to Aloe elgonica, assuming the new plant is a hybrid. 

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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On 1/2/2023 at 7:50 PM, msporty said:

Just a wild guess, but do you think it could be microstigma x marlothii hybrid? The little spines on both sides of the leaves rings of marlothii, but the leaf shape looks reminiscent of microstigma.

There is some variation in the width of the leaves on my Aloe microstigma, but then again, not all are necessarily pure microstigma.  The fact that the one in question is not flowering with the other Aloe microstigma's or microstigma hybrids is a clue in and of itself.  These are some of the first, second and last one possibly a third generation microstigma.

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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Some closer up photos of the one in question to compare to those Aloe microstigmas.  Blue coloring and those spines down the center of the leaflets remind me of my Aloe ferox (when younger) and Aloe marlothii.  This seems to have some damage either from cold or being too wet, which I don't see on other Aloes in my garden, which is a bit perplexing as well.

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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My aloe vera flowered last spring to my surprise. I certainly did not expect it. I dont remember what color it was though, either yellow or red.

Palms - 4 S. romanzoffiana, 1 W. bifurcata, 4 W. robusta, 1 R. rivularis, 1 B. odorata, 1 B. nobilis, 4 S. palmetto, 1 A. merillii, 2 P. canariensis, 1 BxJ, 1 BxJxBxS, 1 BxS, 3 P. roebelenii, 1 H. lagenicaulis, 1 H. verschaffeltii, 9 T. fortunei, 1 C. humilis, 2 C. macrocarpa, 1 L. chinensis, 1 R. excelsa, 1 S. bermudana, 1 L. nitida

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