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The Vine Thread


Merlyn

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I couldn't find a good consolidated list of vines for trellises or arbors, so I figured I would start one!  I've been considering doing a free standing lattice/trellis vine wall (not attached to the house) or have climbing vines go over a pathway archway.  So I have been looking into ones that flower (preferably a lot) and also are not self reseeding or highly invasive.  I have enough maintenance problems already...

Here is a good article on a few Florida options: https://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/marionco/2018/03/29/trellised-vines/

  • Blue Sky Vine (Thunbergia Grandiflora) - rapid growing with aggressive tendrils, not too frost hardy in zone 9. but flowers all year in zone 10?
  • Bougainvillea - Quick grower and trimmable, but not frost hardy and extremely thorny = no!
  • Coral Vine (Antigonon species) – spectacular blooms but very aggressive in Floriduh, considered invasive
  • Climbing Fig (Ficus Pumila) – tough and vigorous dark green dense leaves – but not a flowering display
  • Climbing Old Blush Roses - disease issues and thorns = no!
  • Coral Honeysuckle (Lonicera Sempervirens) – "Blanche Sandman" pretty dense leaves and all summer blooms
  • Cross vine – "Tangerine Beauty" is nice, lots of flowers and pretty dense foliage through a long season.  This might be aggressive or might spread underground?
  • Dutchman's Pipe – sweet looking big 9" heart shaped leaves, but flowers smell like rotting CARRION!!!
  • Jasmine – Carolina Yellow – Winter to early spring flowering
  • Jasmine - Star/Confederate - dark green leaves and white flowers, but spring to early summer flowering only
  • Orchid Vine – Yellow or Lavender/Purple types hardy to 8a and flowers all summer, but tiny boring leaves?
  • Passion Vines – "Aphrodite's Purple Nightie" sterile version "Bahama Blue" and "Betty Myles Young", "Clear Sky" interesting flower and leaf, also might spread onto the ground
  • Trumpet Creeper (Campsis Radicans) – aggressive reseeder and invasive
  • Wisteria – good flowers but relatively short flowering season and boring leaves, aggressively reseeds and destroys the supports!

At the moment my two top options are Coral Honeysuckle and one of the Passion vines.  Please chime in here with your favorites (or most hated) vines or corrections to my current list!

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1 hour ago, Merlyn said:

I couldn't find a good consolidated list of vines for trellises or arbors, so I figured I would start one!  I've been considering doing a free standing lattice/trellis vine wall (not attached to the house) or have climbing vines go over a pathway archway.  So I have been looking into ones that flower (preferably a lot) and also are not self reseeding or highly invasive.  I have enough maintenance problems already...

Here is a good article on a few Florida options: https://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/marionco/2018/03/29/trellised-vines/

  • Blue Sky Vine (Thunbergia Grandiflora) - rapid growing with aggressive tendrils, not too frost hardy in zone 9. but flowers all year in zone 10?
  • Bougainvillea - Quick grower and trimmable, but not frost hardy and extremely thorny = no!
  • Coral Vine (Antigonon species) – spectacular blooms but very aggressive in Floriduh, considered invasive
  • Climbing Fig (Ficus Pumila) – tough and vigorous dark green dense leaves – but not a flowering display
  • Climbing Old Blush Roses - disease issues and thorns = no!
  • Coral Honeysuckle (Lonicera Sempervirens) – "Blanche Sandman" pretty dense leaves and all summer blooms
  • Cross vine – "Tangerine Beauty" is nice, lots of flowers and pretty dense foliage through a long season.  This might be aggressive or might spread underground?
  • Dutchman's Pipe – sweet looking big 9" heart shaped leaves, but flowers smell like rotting CARRION!!!
  • Jasmine – Carolina Yellow – Winter to early spring flowering
  • Jasmine - Star/Confederate - dark green leaves and white flowers, but spring to early summer flowering only
  • Orchid Vine – Yellow or Lavender/Purple types hardy to 8a and flowers all summer, but tiny boring leaves?
  • Passion Vines – "Aphrodite's Purple Nightie" sterile version "Bahama Blue" and "Betty Myles Young", "Clear Sky" interesting flower and leaf, also might spread onto the ground
  • Trumpet Creeper (Campsis Radicans) – aggressive reseeder and invasive
  • Wisteria – good flowers but relatively short flowering season and boring leaves, aggressively reseeds and destroys the supports!

At the moment my two top options are Coral Honeysuckle and one of the Passion vines.  Please chime in here with your favorites (or most hated) vines or corrections to my current list!

Would never plant standard Bougainvillea.. After dealing w/ them for a year, ...an absolute mess ( shed Bracts )  If it freezes, you'll hate ....emphasize HATE having to trim it back/ cut it out. Only Bougs. i use here are the thorn-less, Torch Plow / Pixie types.. Free standing / needs no support and ..for whatever reason, dried out bracts aren't as much of a mess as standard Boug. varieties when they blow around. Seriously contemplating ripping out the two Barbra Karst planted here.

Coral Vine ..Yes, standard form is a nightmare there. White flowered form is supposedly tamer. ( Wouldn't trust it there though )

Aristiolochia / Dutchman's Pipe.. Unless you go smash your face in the flowers, you won't notice the scent of them.

Probably too warm there for Wisteria.. Non- native form is invasive. Why anyone would plant them anywhere it is warm in the first place i have no clue.. Was never impressed with them in California.

Ficus pumila / Climbing Fig? you'll hate it faster than Bougainvillea.. Near impossible to eradicate once established. Don't be fooled by the tiny leaves, Mature leaves are MUCH larger.

Jasmine- anything?   Nope, not anywhere on my property..

Coral Honeysuckle is a great idea.. Easy and no issues. Though there were some other interesting species there also..

Awesome vine options, ones that flower anyway?

Thunbergia mysorensis, Clock Vine.. hardier than people assume. Few Vines compare to the flower display on these. there's a look - alike species with less impressive flowers to avoid ( if you want the real deal )

Rangoon Creeper, Single flowered form is the nicest..  Should be Evergreen there.

Petrea volubilis, Sandpaper Vine / Queen's Wreath.. Fantastic Wisteria replacement.. There is another species that produces longer flower " chains ", and a white -flowered species as well. Evergreen or foliage will take on a Purplish tone during a cold spell. Don't recall mine or others going totally leafless during really cold cold spells.

Pyrostegia venusta, Flame Vine ..A little aggressive but easily tamed. Evergreen.


...All Passiflora.. native, regionally native, small/ large flowered ...and others like X " Purple Tiger " < Big leaves, Huge, wild colored flowers / Fruit, which is edible. Evergreen. Can be a bit aggressive.

Beaumontia.. Big leaves, Huge, Easter Lily-like flowers smell like a combo of Vanilla, Wintergreen, and Allspice. Evergreen / May drop some leaves during serious cold. Needs some winter chill to flower properly anyway.

Frangipani Vine / Chonemorpha.. One for the cool kids. Big leaves. Flowers look ( and smell ) like Plumeria, with a hint of Jasmine and Vanilla. Also normally Evergreen

Solandra, Chalice Vine.. Another one for the cool kids.. S. maxima may be the most common, but there are at least two other sp. ( Someone who'd come into the nursery i worked at in Sarasota was growing all the cultivated species ) Evergreen

Hoya.. Knew some people growing them in the ground in central FL. and in Bradenton. Some sp. have big leaves / huge flowers that look like Porcelain. Some are very fragrant.. Many are hardier than the house plant folks let on. Evergreen

Distamake dissectus ( some other sp. as well ) Neat leaves, average flowers. Easy. Not quite as aggressive as Moonvine can be ( though those are cool as well, esp. for giant white flowers with a strong night time fragrance ) Native Morning Glories are great for annual, late season pops of Blue and Red Orange.

Solanum wendlandii. Neat vining Nightshade. Evergreen, for the most part.

Jade Vines.. Forget the Turquoise flowered one up there.. others are hardier though.. If you can find it, the dark Purple flowered species, Mucuna cyclocarpa is amazing.  This one may be winter deciduous. Others, the tropical sp. are evergreen.

....I'm sure i'm missing some others i grew, or saw growing while living there..

 

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One more vine suggestion, although the flowers look better hanging as do many jade vines: Camptosema grandiflora (Crista-de-Galo, Dwarf or Brazilian red jade vine). Mine here in the Sacramento suburbs was getting ready to flower last spring and a cold snap ruined that! Otherwise, it grows well in my 9b climate in half shade.  This picture was borrowed from an online source. And still waiting for my Pyrostegia venusta to bloom. 

Camptosema.jpg

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I will add, I have grown Combretum indicum (Rangoon Creeper) for several years on a free standing arbor. It is fast, evergreen and it is covered in flowers literally all summer (April through October maybe?). The flowers are VERY fragrant - they remind me of really ripe nectarines. 

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Another vote for Rangoon creeper!! Smells like pink bubblegum to me. The leaves are very lush too FB_IMG_1663976943559.jpg.e4eeb43023c3915b5bc24e894fc96733.jpg

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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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@Silas_Sancona that is one helluva list of vines!  I definitely agree on the Bougainvillea, my in ground shrubbery burnt to the ground at 27-28F with frost.  Those stems were a real pain (literally and figuratively) to remove and dispose of.  The only good part is they were small enough to clip with a regular hand loppers.  But I won't plant another spiny bush or vine.

Ficus pumila - I'd probably avoid this too, after seeing a big brick wall covered with it.  It looks like someone planted it and it just took over almost 200 yards worth of wall.  Occasionally some of it vanishes, like a homeowner tried to get rid of it...and it's back really fast.  This could be something good for a really dense free standing green wall.  But I'd rather have some nice flowers. :)

Dutchman's Pipe - I read that Aristolochia Tomentosa and Macrophylla are almost odor-free, and sorta smell a bit like lemon pledge.  Gigantea is stronger smelling, but all of them attract flies...nope no thanks!

Thunbergia mysorensis - Clock vine - This looks like a good one for an arch or arbor, but might not be frost hardy below 30F.  I saw Thunbergia Alata (Black Eyed Susan) on a wall, but haven't found any photos online of Mysorensis being used on a wall.  Maybe it's just the dangling flowers look odd on a wall?

Rangoon Creeper - This one looks like a great choice for arches, but does seem to spread out a decent distance from the supports.  I saw descriptions of it as being "shrubby" in form, which seems apt.  So maybe not a good choice for a narrow arch, as you'd always be trimming it back to get through.  The only on-wall or on-lattice photos looked a bit sparse and not a complete visual block. 

Petrea volubilis - Those are some impressive flower chains!  It also looks a bit shrubby, so probably a great choice for a wall or large arch or arbor, but not a narrow arch.  I read on SMGrowers that they survived high teens and also did not drop any leaves after 3 nights of 25F.  So that's definitely an option for me!

Pyrostegia venusta - Flame Vine - This looks like a great cold-hardy (~25F) choice with lots of bright orange flowers, suitable for wall, arbor or arch.  It is considered invasive in Florida, but maybe not in colder zones.

Passiflora - I like all the options, I ran across another called "Lavender Lady" that is supposed to be very hardy to 10F and might be a year-round flowering plant in Florida?

Beaumontia Grandiflora - This looks like a really nice dark green vine with white trumpet flowers.  It is apparently only 28F hardy, and might drop leaves for me with my yearly 28F frosts.  I'll have to look into this one for temperature reports.

Frangipani Vine / Chonemorpha - Also really big flowers and leaves, but reports I found said deciduous with any frost. 

Solandra, Chalice Vine - The leaves and flowers look amazing on this one.  UF/IFAS says it is very poisonous though, as a relative of Nightshade.  I can see Danny Kaye mumbling "The chalice from the palace has the brew that is true."

Hoya - some of the Carnosa types are listed as zone 10, but SMGrowers lists it as good to 23F.  This could be a good choice if that temperature rating is true!

Distamake dissectus - this is listed as a weed vine in Florida, but I've seen it growing around here and not taking over like potato vine.  The snowflake leaves are really cool!

Solanum wendlandii - Nightshade "Giant Potato Vine" but not the invasive noxious weed "air potato vine."  SMGrowers has this hardy to close to 20F, but it sometimes has thorns and is very poisonous.  It's also called the "Divorce Vine" for some unknown reason...

Jade vines - Purple Jade Vine Mucuna cyclocarpa - PDN has this as a zone 7b dieback.  There's not a ton of info on this one.

Feel free to correct me on any above errors!

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11 minutes ago, Merlyn said:

@Silas_Sancona that is one helluva list of vines!  I definitely agree on the Bougainvillea, my in ground shrubbery burnt to the ground at 27-28F with frost.  Those stems were a real pain (literally and figuratively) to remove and dispose of.  The only good part is they were small enough to clip with a regular hand loppers.  But I won't plant another spiny bush or vine.

Ficus pumila - I'd probably avoid this too, after seeing a big brick wall covered with it.  It looks like someone planted it and it just took over almost 200 yards worth of wall.  Occasionally some of it vanishes, like a homeowner tried to get rid of it...and it's back really fast.  This could be something good for a really dense free standing green wall.  But I'd rather have some nice flowers. :)

Dutchman's Pipe - I read that Aristolochia Tomentosa and Macrophylla are almost odor-free, and sorta smell a bit like lemon pledge.  Gigantea is stronger smelling, but all of them attract flies...nope no thanks!

Thunbergia mysorensis - Clock vine - This looks like a good one for an arch or arbor, but might not be frost hardy below 30F.  I saw Thunbergia Alata (Black Eyed Susan) on a wall, but haven't found any photos online of Mysorensis being used on a wall.  Maybe it's just the dangling flowers look odd on a wall?

Rangoon Creeper - This one looks like a great choice for arches, but does seem to spread out a decent distance from the supports.  I saw descriptions of it as being "shrubby" in form, which seems apt.  So maybe not a good choice for a narrow arch, as you'd always be trimming it back to get through.  The only on-wall or on-lattice photos looked a bit sparse and not a complete visual block. 

Petrea volubilis - Those are some impressive flower chains!  It also looks a bit shrubby, so probably a great choice for a wall or large arch or arbor, but not a narrow arch.  I read on SMGrowers that they survived high teens and also did not drop any leaves after 3 nights of 25F.  So that's definitely an option for me!

Pyrostegia venusta - Flame Vine - This looks like a great cold-hardy (~25F) choice with lots of bright orange flowers, suitable for wall, arbor or arch.  It is considered invasive in Florida, but maybe not in colder zones.

Passiflora - I like all the options, I ran across another called "Lavender Lady" that is supposed to be very hardy to 10F and might be a year-round flowering plant in Florida?

Beaumontia Grandiflora - This looks like a really nice dark green vine with white trumpet flowers.  It is apparently only 28F hardy, and might drop leaves for me with my yearly 28F frosts.  I'll have to look into this one for temperature reports.

Frangipani Vine / Chonemorpha - Also really big flowers and leaves, but reports I found said deciduous with any frost. 

Solandra, Chalice Vine - The leaves and flowers look amazing on this one.  UF/IFAS says it is very poisonous though, as a relative of Nightshade.  I can see Danny Kaye mumbling "The chalice from the palace has the brew that is true."

Hoya - some of the Carnosa types are listed as zone 10, but SMGrowers lists it as good to 23F.  This could be a good choice if that temperature rating is true!

Distamake dissectus - this is listed as a weed vine in Florida, but I've seen it growing around here and not taking over like potato vine.  The snowflake leaves are really cool!

Solanum wendlandii - Nightshade "Giant Potato Vine" but not the invasive noxious weed "air potato vine."  SMGrowers has this hardy to close to 20F, but it sometimes has thorns and is very poisonous.  It's also called the "Divorce Vine" for some unknown reason...

Jade vines - Purple Jade Vine Mucuna cyclocarpa - PDN has this as a zone 7b dieback.  There's not a ton of info on this one.

Feel free to correct me on any above errors!

Never heard of flies being a problem w/ Dutchman's Pipe, not big flies anyway.. Most do attract tiny flies however ( How the flowers are pollinated ) Flowers on the Big species are some of the weirdest looking things you'll ever see.

Mysore Clock Vine would be better on an Arbor for sure since he flowers do hang down..  Black Eyed Susan?  Might be better on a Trellis, but that one is quite aggressive ( almost like Coral Vine ) and may die back in the winter there..

Petrea would work on a trellis and the flowers Big, established specimen is quite a sight when it flowers.

Only thing i never liked much about Passiflora like Lavender Lady is they're kind of thin.. Never really filling in all that thick..  Purple Tiger / some of the big leaved / flowered species fill in a bit thicker.

I can't recall my Beaumontia ever dropping leaves during the winter, but maybe it just never got cold enough either in FL. or California.. I never had an opportunity to plop mine in the ground and let it really fill out but mine would put on fairly thick growth each year in FL..  Established specimens i saw in So. Cal were pretty dense as well.  Here's a screen shot from Pinterest of a really thick specimen:

***Credit to Pinterest source ***
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There is another sp. B. murtonii w/ smaller leaves, and another, B. jerdoniana which is supposed to have variegated leaves ( Picture of it on Top Tropicals' site ) Never grown it so no idea on it's performance.  Had heard B. murtonii is supposed to be slightly hardier than grandiflora  but could never find one to test it.

My Frangipani Vine did drop some leaves a couple times in both FL. and CA.. but flushed new growth pretty quickly once it warmed up in FL.

Solandra are poisonous, if you eat it, lol..  Very dense growth once established. Have heard you don't want to stuff your face in the flowers for long periods, but no other problems i've heard of..  Miss all the ones i'd had.

Never heard of Solanum wendlandii having any thorns.. Don't remember any on one i'd had..  Never understood the nick name.

Hoya carnosa  is definitely hardier than 10,  By how much is the bigger question though..  Left one at my grandparents in San Jose ( that side of town is listed as 9b but has seen lower 20s on rare occasion ) years ago and, to my knowledge, it never had issues w/ any colder winters there. Grew like a weed from pictures sent to me.  I kept several other sp. outdoors on a fence when i lived in Bradenton which weren't bothered by a couple frosty mornings there.. That's not to say several hours of temperature exposure lower than 29-30F wouldn't have torched some -or all- of those.  There's a fairly detailed list on Hoya cold tolerance somewhere on the net that might be worth looking over, even if you just keep a few around in hanging pots.

I always question when state noxious weed lists include native vines on their list..  AZ did this w/ all our native morning glories until recently removing them..  Distamake sp. might grow a bit aggressively,  but i myself wouldn't consider it a weed.. Fast grower yes, but Nothing like XXXX Air Potato. 

Specimens of Alamo Vine ( D. dissectus ) i've seen seemed pretty tame, but that might be under our conditions. The yellow -flowered sp. from Baja ( Distamake aureus ) is used on trellis, against walls, Arbors here ( though a rare sight only due to availability ) and down in Baja..  Both may die back in colder winter areas / years though, esp Alamo Vine. Return from a pretty big tuberous root in the spring if cut down. Snowflake-like leaves on Alamo Vine are pretty sweet, even on one i have planted that is just starting to put on size..

Agree, there needs to be much more information regarding cultivation notes of Purple Jade Vine.. Had read ..maybe via what PDN had mentioned, maybe another source..  that pollinating the flowers can be a little challenging,  which is why it isn't as widely available in the trade as it could be.  Think Peckerwood / The John Fairey Garden grows it as well and that theirs returns from whatever cold they see.  Imagine in an area that isn't as cold it may not go completely dormant.  For those flowers, going dormant in the winter wouldn't bother me though, haha.

I'd heard the same thing about potential aggressiveness / invasive tendency of Flame Vine in FL but that seemed a bit overblown..  possible it could be in S. FL though ( what doesn't grow like a weed down there ).  Grew one in San Jose and it never had any issues w/ cold there..  Selby Botanical has / had -if removed now- a nice specimen covering a wall as you walk up to the front entrance.  Bright Orange flowers were a nice pop of color in late winter/ earliest spring just before everything else would start flowering. In San Jose, mine would flower in late Fall / Winter. Interesting contrast to " fall color " produced by the neighborhood Liquidamber street trees nearby.

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Hmm good question. Rangoon creeper is a very large vine with large leaves. It wants to climb to the top of its support, then drape to the ground. I have a wall of Rangoon even though it's planted on a free-standing arbor. It climbed to the top of the arbor and then draped over, creating a dense wall of foliage and blooms. If you can believe, there's a tall, free standing arbor underneath the Rangoon creeper in this picture. 

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11 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

Hmm good question. Rangoon creeper is a very large vine with large leaves. It wants to climb to the top of its support, then drape to the ground. I have a wall of Rangoon even though it's planted on a free-standing arbor. It climbed to the top of the arbor and then draped over, creating a dense wall of foliage and blooms. If you can believe, there's a tall, free standing arbor underneath the Rangoon creeper in this picture.

Now that's an impressive wall of Rangoon!  Pictures I'd seen online showed it being somewhat sparse on a lattice wall, but maybe that's because it was a relatively new planting or they are just "flower photos."  I should have checked the temperature rating on this one, various reports have it defoliating with even a light frost.  Sigh...  :D

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3 hours ago, Peter said:

How thirsty is the Rangoon creeper?

I would say " they like water a lot" I have two in my garden at 43ºN, one in the best sunny spot but dry because it is under an eave. The other under the shade of an Erythrina crista galli, more in the open than the other. Both in the ground. Which one  sets flowers? The second one, not the first one, although I water it too. Have a look!

 

I also have Pirostegia ignea. It is over 10 mts long, and it flowers from mid October to early May.

I also have in the ground Distictis buccinatoria. Thunbergia grandiflora and Elata. and Solandra grandiflora.

And Petrea volubilis, Antigonon leptotus, Allamanda cathartica and Allamanda banchetii in big pots, which I plan to put in the ground next spring, as well as a new Allamanda schotii

 

 

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  • 10 months later...

@Calosphace suggested Gelsemium Sempervirens aka Carolina Jessamine as a good hardy vine option.  I'm not sure why I ignored this species before, maybe I confused Jessamine with Jasmine, as I had "Carolina Yellow Jasmine" listed up above.  It's a Florida native, which is nice.  The flowers look great, and the leaves are a decently dense medium to dark green.  I think this one would make a pretty good vine on a trellis or deck.  Officially it's good to zone 7 and in full sun, though it'll grow in part shade too.

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I'd rank Climbing fig as invasive unfortunately, I deal with it a lot at work.

Also pedantic lol but: Campis radicans is aggressive not invasive. Invasive is a label applied to exotics. I find Crossvine more friendly to work with in garden settings,

As far as vines go my go to for Central and North FL is Lonicera sempervirens Dan's Everblooming, a TX selection of native honeysuckle that lives up to the title it is available from Almost Eden Plants.

I also like:
Carolina jessamine
Passiflora x Incense is semi-evergreen to upper 20s however with Passiflora I always plant them in containers (with bottom sawed off) underground to prevent the horizontal runners from spreading the plant. Only PAssiflora I have not had spread via runners is whatever form of P. suberosa I have. It is a great plant for "layering" with other vines as it itself is very subtle with tiny flowers.

Avoid most exotic Passiflora as they are toxic traps to our butterflies. Incense has been said to be okay though and it has a much longer  bloom season than the Maypop (its native parent).

Aristolochia trilobata is the only exotic vining Aristolochia I know of in circulation that appears to not kill butterflies. I grow mine in shade but it does appear to do ok in more sun too. It was evergreen to 26 F in protected site for me. It's easy to propagate by air-layering. It can be easily layered with most other vines.

Manettia cordifolia, I grow the John Eisley clone from Almost Eden and it is a heavy flowering plant and I've never had it spread.
Winged Bean, the daylength neutral one from Baker Creek seeds overwintered for me and it has surprisingly large flowers and basically all parts of it are edible raw. I haven't had any seedlings produced (probably because they are somewhat susceptible to nematodes so they need to get started in containers first then planted).

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Collector of native, ornithophilous, Stachytarpheta, iridescent, and blue or teal-flowering plants

 

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Also yeah Carolina jessamine can be surprisingly dense in part shade. I can take pics of my plants sometimes but they do have the added benefit of not getting some of the mildew issues that can afflict honeysuckle in shady wet conditions.  It has nice glossy green foliage too, definitely a tropical "filler". I have it on my north fence where it helps shelter Salvia x Big Swing and whatever the yellow and red Costus common in cultivation is. Foliage is similar enough to Manettia cordifolia and Passiflora suberosa that they can be mixed imo

Collector of native, ornithophilous, Stachytarpheta, iridescent, and blue or teal-flowering plants

 

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On 9/25/2022 at 3:57 AM, Silas_Sancona said:

I can't recall my Beaumontia ever dropping leaves during the winter, but maybe it just never got cold enough either in FL. or California.. I never had an opportunity to plop mine in the ground and let it really fill out but mine would put on fairly thick growth each year in FL..  Established specimens i saw in So. Cal were pretty dense as well. 

I have two Beaumontias, one on my terrace in Rome, in a big planter under an overhang, kept quite dry in winter, well, this plant keeps it's leaves. The other one is planted in my garden near the sea, where the temperatures are slightly higher, and this one sheds the leaves, gets also much more water in winter. Needless to say, without the leaves the effect is much less impressive

102e1c6d-2f0a-4835-ade9-05e87462f96c.jpg

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11 hours ago, Tomas said:

I have two Beaumontias, one on my terrace in Rome, in a big planter under an overhang, kept quite dry in winter, well, this plant keeps it's leaves. The other one is planted in my garden near the sea, where the temperatures are slightly higher, and this one sheds the leaves, gets also much more water in winter. Needless to say, without the leaves the effect is much less impressive

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Very nice..  Interesting that the one kept drier retains it's leaves more than the other specimen..  Curious, Either of your specimens producing seed yet?

Was a bit surprised to see that the one i'd had did ok here ( in a container ) for about 2 years before the heat took it out.. Provided regular water,  I'd bet it could work here, trained to a Trellis against an east facing wall where something tall / airy ..like a Mesquite provided bright, but all day shade.

Had exactly that kind of spot at the old house,  but i lost it before i could get it planted ...or we moved back to CA.

Frangipani Vine ( Conemorpha fragrans  { or penangensis.. Place i'd bought it from may have mixed up their plants. Both look similar / Fragrance of the flowers is similar } )  was the other " big-leaved "  subtropical flowering  " Liana " that did alright here ..until the heat got it, lol. 

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On 8/3/2023 at 1:01 AM, Silas_Sancona said:

Very nice..  Interesting that the one kept drier retains it's leaves more than the other specimen..  Curious, Either of your specimens producing seed yet?

Was a bit surprised to see that the one i'd had did ok here ( in a container ) for about 2 years before the heat took it out.. Provided regular water,  I'd bet it could work here, trained to a Trellis against an east facing wall where something tall / airy ..like a Mesquite provided bright, but all day shade.

Had exactly that kind of spot at the old house,  but i lost it before i could get it planted ...or we moved back to CA.

Frangipani Vine ( Conemorpha fragrans  { or penangensis.. Place i'd bought it from may have mixed up their plants. Both look similar / Fragrance of the flowers is similar } )  was the other " big-leaved "  subtropical flowering  " Liana " that did alright here ..until the heat got it, lol. 

No seeds yet, but do Beaumontia set seed at all?

I forgot to mention that one is a clone of the other, it was propagated by air layering

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20 minutes ago, Tomas said:

No seeds yet, but do Beaumontia set seed at all?

I forgot to mention that one is a clone of the other, it was propagated by air layering

Yes,  If they form, Seedpods will look like fat, green Sausages, ...or a chubby, short Zucchini,  and be full of fluffy, plume-topped seeds,  ..Similar to what Asclepias  seeds look like.. when the pod ripens and opens.

Interesting that, despite being from the same plant, the 2 specimens behave differently.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/4/2023 at 7:36 PM, Silas_Sancona said:

Interesting that, despite being from the same plant, the 2 specimens behave differently.

The mystery could have been solved, we had some strong winds yeaterday and the plant here in Santa Marinella partialy defoliated, the only plant that was damaged. It could be that the  winter weather to which this plant is fully exposed compromise the leaves making them drop in spring 

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Edited by Tomas
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So here's an odd question: Are there any vines that grow happily in shade/part-shade but don't tend to grow up and info full sun?  One of the disadvantages of using Viburnum as a hedgeline is that they can grow 20+ feet tall, but only maintain dense foliage for about the top 6 feet.  On the Southwest side I have about 12-15' tall shrubberies, but the bottom 6-8' or so is pretty sparse of leaves.  In one spot there's a grape-ish vine (possibly native Muscadine grape) but it tends to grow straight up and then form a blanket over the top of the Viburnum.  If there were a vine that did the opposite that would be great...aggressively growing with heavy foliage in the lower shade but doesn't form a blanket over the top of the Viburnum.  Anyone know of such a vine?

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I really can't get enough of bougainvillea. They are a pain to maintain, but they just give you the biggest wow factor in terms of mass of color. I have several, but really fond of this double pink. 

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This is my old Barbara Karst. I trim this one back pretty severely every year 

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Passiflora Mission Dolores 

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Combretum indicum

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Mandevilla laxa

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Daleschampia

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Bignonia capreolata - blooms heavily like this in spring/early summer, then sporadically throughout summer. 

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  • 9 months later...
On 8/29/2023 at 6:38 PM, Josue Diaz said:

 

Mandevilla laxa

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I'm reviving this thread because I'm on a quest for M. laxa. (I think.)Three questions:

Is the fragrance as good (and powerful) as they claim?

Will it do OK in the humid climate of the southeast US?

Can you recommend a source?

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37 minutes ago, Manalto said:

I'm reviving this thread because I'm on a quest for M. laxa. (I think.)Three questions:

Is the fragrance as good (and powerful) as they claim?

Will it do OK in the humid climate of the southeast US?

Can you recommend a source?

Regarding the first question,  ..Absolutely

Not sure about the 2nd, though mine did fine in FL.. No issues w/ cold in CA or FL.  Not cold in either place, so i couldn't tell you how they fare in places below 9B.

More info regarding that aspect from San Marcos Growers:  https://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp?strLetter=S&plant_id=1038

Annie's Annuals ( CA ) might have it in stock ... Looked like it when i checked a minute ago.   Odd that more nurseries aren't growing it.  Great, easy to maintain vine.

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8 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Regarding the first question,  ..Absolutely

Not sure about the 2nd, though mine did fine in FL.. No issues w/ cold in CA or FL.  Not cold in either place, so i couldn't tell you how they fare in places below 9B.

More info regarding that aspect from San Marcos Growers:  https://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp?strLetter=S&plant_id=1038

Annie's Annuals ( CA ) might have it in stock ... Looked like it when i checked a minute ago.   

I should have mentioned that I found it from Annie's for $14.95, but shipping seemed rather steep at $64.92, hence my continued search.

Good to know it lives up to its reputation for fragrance.  Thanks for the link!

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17 minutes ago, Manalto said:

I should have mentioned that I found it from Annie's for $14.95, but shipping seemed rather steep at $64.92, hence my continued search.

Good to know it lives up to its reputation for fragrance.  Thanks for the link!

:greenthumb: 

64 bucks, for shipping?  Yeahh,  that's definitely steep for just ONE plant.  Wow, lol.

Might email Kartuz Greenhouses in Vista.. I know they've sold it in the past.  A couple wholesalers did as well but, ..can't really mail order from a wholesaler.

I'll keep looking...

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3 hours ago, Manalto said:

I'm reviving this thread because I'm on a quest for M. laxa. (I think.)Three questions:

Is the fragrance as good (and powerful) as they claim?

Will it do OK in the humid climate of the southeast US?

Can you recommend a source?

It is fragrant! kind of a thick, heady fragrance - not light and floral to my nose. But in my dry climate, you need to stick your nose in just about any flower to get a whiff - or there has to be a once-in-a-year tropical summer storm to increase humidity and carry the fragrance.  Funny you'd ask because just this morning I planted a whole pod of seeds! Had I seen this earlier I could have sent you the seeds. 

 

JD

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12 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

It is fragrant! kind of a thick, heady fragrance - not light and floral to my nose...this morning I planted a whole pod of seeds! Had I seen this earlier I could have sent you the seeds. 

 

I appreciate the thought. I've come across a few sellers offering seeds. I guess my Impatient self may as well go that route. No one would have the nerve to charge that extortionist rate to ship seeds, right? One would think.

My garden is loaded with fragrances: gardenia, osmanthus, brugmansia, trachelospermum, mirabilis, citrus... the list goes on. I've known folks who find some of these too strong. (I try not to associate with such people.) I'm in the swoon-with-pleasure camp. Even in our high humidity, most don't fill the air for a significant distance - with the exception of Osmanthus fragrans, here known as sweet olive, whose unassuming flowers pack a heady wallop that travels. And of course there are those who are repelled by sweet olive's fragrance. Go figure. People. I swear.

Nathan, thanks for the Kartuz tip. I'll see what they say before "settling" for seeds. 

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I just put a Rangoon on my fence in the cottage garden with a Camptosema grandiflora.  I've had them both int he greenhouse and I think they will both do ok here outdoors. The Dwarf Red Jade escaped the greenhouse years ago and hangs down the outside

If you have the climate of course SPrtonylodon macrobotrys is a good one...I don't so its in the greenhouse.

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"You can't see California without Marlon Brando's eyes"---SliPknot

 

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I bought a "Coral Honeysuckle" aka Lonicera Sempervirens in December and had it in my nursery area over the winter.  Oddly enough it defoliated in January, despite there being no significant cold fronts.  The only reason I can think of for the defoliation was that it's in a 3G pot with a small lattice, but the "soil" weighs absolutely nothing.  I suspect it's all peat moss, and it might have been out of range of my nursery sprinklers.  It's come back quickly and is growing well once I moved it into sprinkler range.  My reading of this plant is it prefers rich, moist soil and can tolerate occasional "poor drainage."  I'm guessing this means it's also not happy with going completely dry...so that might be the reason for defoliation instead of cold.  Any thoughts?

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7 minutes ago, Merlyn said:

I bought a "Coral Honeysuckle" aka Lonicera Sempervirens in December and had it in my nursery area over the winter.  Oddly enough it defoliated in January, despite there being no significant cold fronts.  The only reason I can think of for the defoliation was that it's in a 3G pot with a small lattice, but the "soil" weighs absolutely nothing.  I suspect it's all peat moss, and it might have been out of range of my nursery sprinklers.  It's come back quickly and is growing well once I moved it into sprinkler range.  My reading of this plant is it prefers rich, moist soil and can tolerate occasional "poor drainage."  I'm guessing this means it's also not happy with going completely dry...so that might be the reason for defoliation instead of cold.  Any thoughts?

Here, in the ground, these survive dry -er soils / heat w/ out too much trouble ...as long as they are placed where they are shaded mid- late day. 

Do look better / grow a bit faster w/ a little more moisture though.  In pots, definitely have to keep them hydrated.. How i killed mine .. One i bought, rather than one that popped up on it's own from seed. 

As far as defoliation?  it does the same thing here around the same time of year. 

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1 hour ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Here, in the ground, these survive dry -er soils / heat w/ out too much trouble ...as long as they are placed where they are shaded mid- late day. 

Do look better / grow a bit faster w/ a little more moisture though.  In pots, definitely have to keep them hydrated.. How i killed mine .. One i bought, rather than one that popped up on it's own from seed. 

As far as defoliation?  it does the same thing here around the same time of year. 

That's good to know, it seems fine in the pot with daily watering.  It's supposed to be "evergreen" in the South, so I was surprised when it defoliated.  I think it was only about 36 or 37F with very mild frost.  Maybe this isn't a good choice for a 24/7/365 hedgeline.

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10 minutes ago, Merlyn said:

That's good to know, it seems fine in the pot with daily watering.  It's supposed to be "evergreen" in the South, so I was surprised when it defoliated.  I think it was only about 36 or 37F with very mild frost.  Maybe this isn't a good choice for a 24/7/365 hedgeline.

The one in the ground here will retain most leaves, but drop some  before new growth resumes in Spring..   Definitely tougher than mid 30s ..Specimen up at Boyce Thompson sees mid 20s and a dusting - inch or two of snow once or twice every couple winters..  Will have to see what it looks like that time of year the net time i get up there.

Fairly dense grower, but even their specimen is more of a scrambly " fill-a-trellis " than a solid green " wall " of foliage on one. ..if that makes any sense..


Giant Burmese Honeysuckle ( L. hildebrandiana ) is supposed to be evergreen but, beware ..it can get MASSIVE and can grow pretty fast. 

Not sure how it would do there but,  San Marcos Growers lists hardiness down into the lower 20s. https://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp?plant_id=1012

Might be a better evergreen vine option for something to create privacy,  if it is offered there..  Because of how fast it can grow, it might not be.

Extremely fragrant, like most Honeysuckles.

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@Silas_Sancona that makes sense to me on the L. Sempervirens.  I'd probably pick a different vine if I were planning to do a vinewall, but it sounds like I should try it on a trellis or arch. 

I found some photos on Giant Burmese Honeysuckle and it looks really neat.  I've added that one to my possibles list!

I ran across a big box store red-white mix of Mandevilla Sanderi "Brazilian Jasmine."  It's a nice looking vine, but might be only zone 10+. 

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6 minutes ago, Merlyn said:

@Silas_Sancona that makes sense to me on the L. Sempervirens.  I'd probably pick a different vine if I were planning to do a vinewall, but it sounds like I should try it on a trellis or arch. 

I found some photos on Giant Burmese Honeysuckle and it looks really neat.  I've added that one to my possibles list!

I ran across a big box store red-white mix of Mandevilla Sanderi "Brazilian Jasmine."  It's a nice looking vine, but might be only zone 10+. 

I've heard of them surviving in 9B, but think they get cut down by anything below 29-30-ish, maybe a little lower.  Don't like to be soaking wet either. Nice vine regardless though the flowers have no scent.

Someone here had posted about a red- flowered " bush-like " Mandevilla they'd planted returning from the ground in 8B?,  i think..

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13 hours ago, metalfan said:

I just put a Rangoon on my fence in the cottage garden with a Camptosema grandiflora.  I've had them both int he greenhouse and I think they will both do ok here outdoors. The Dwarf Red Jade escaped the greenhouse years ago and hangs down the outside

If you have the climate of course SPrtonylodon macrobotrys is a good one...I don't so its in the greenhouse.

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Envious of your success with Camptosema grandiflora! Mine grows like a weed on a trellis, but its flowering period coincides with the lowest temps each winter here in NorCal. The buds always drop off! Your jade vine is awesome!

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The best climbing vines I find are the aroids: Philodendrons, Monsteras, Epipremnums, Amydrium,Raphidophora. The more "conventional" vines here tend to become either extremely invasive, or not survive well. Had a lot of Bougainvillea but got rid of all but one. Their spines kept puncturing the tyres of the ride-on mower. There's some native vines here that do well, of course, but have fairly insignificant flowers. In reality, vines for me are more in the line of foliage plants.

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Great thread. Will have to take a closer look later but it looks like most are not feasible for my climate (effectively 8A). 

Quite impressed with Merremia dissecta (Alamo vine) this year. Survived the extreme droughts and cold of the past few years. It seems to really take off this year. 

What's a bit missing from the discussion here are the climbing roses. I know, I know... but hear me out! I am not some old lady! And I am not talking about the newer commercial crap roses (often odorless) that require an arsenal of chemicals to look presentable. There are some great good old 'earth kind' roses that are tough as nails. My personal favorite is 'red cascade'. Small flower but seems indestructible once established (including months of 100F with zero water). Climbers have the advantage that you can grow them beyond the reach of vicious deer as these animals cannot climb trees (yet).  

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