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Growing palms in z7 NC - trials and tribulations


NCpalmqueen

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I've been growing palms in the ground here in the piedmont of NC for nearly 20 years and have tested all possible species and variants  (and sizes) that money can buy.  My observations about Sabals, Washys and others from my locale are as follows.  (I did not want to hijack an existing thread.)  This doesn't mean that you would get these same results in another 7b...there are too many factors that affect long-term viability (microclimates, health of the plant, management of the plant, winter wetness, winter harshness, protection methods, etc.).    All of my first set of comments are about palms that were not protected during NC winters.   I do believe that a lot of my failures were due to the plant being too small too put into the ground and face NC winters.  I list my other failures, too.   BTW, after trying and failing to grow palms for this long, you'd think I would cringe at the thought of trying another one.   Not really, but I have expanded my interest into yuccas and agaves, which require no winter protection.  :-)   (Sorry for the long read.)

SABALS:

  1. SABAL PALMETTO.  This is a native palm for North Carolina, i.e., the coast.  However, inland, they were not long-term (for me), as much as I wanted them to be.  I've grown up seed from the coastal sabals and put seedlings directly into the ground, purchased 5 gal sizes to put directly into the ground, and purchased at least a dozen of fully grown hurricane-cut ones, i.e., generally they were from Florida.  For the seedlings and the juvenile ones, all succumbed to winter's madness eventually (max 3-5 yrs).   For the large hurricane-cut ones, I got at least 7-8 years out of them before all but one died.   (I've moved so I don't know if that survivor is still alive today.)  
  2. SABAL MINOR.  Long-term survivor and turns weedy, i.e., it produces hundreds of seeds that all seem to germinate.  (Doesn't seem to matter the geographical origin)  Next thing you know, you have hundreds of seedlings crammed together.  I stopped planting Minors and have none at my current residence on purpose.
  3. SABAL X-BRAZORIENSIS  While I have had managed to kill a few, in general could be long-termers in a better microclimate than mine were.  These get really big fast and take up a large space.
  4. SABAL 'BIRMINGHAM'.  This palm, regardless of what size when placed in the ground, has been a long-termer for me.  I've moved them repeatedly, ignored them,  never watered them, and yet they continue to grow and prosper.  They will eventually trunk up but do so at a snail's pace.  I have at least a half dozen of these (seedling size) in my front yard today and will not protect them.   They need 3 years (like most palms) before they start getting really pretty and robust.
  5. SABAL MEXICANA.  I love the look of this sabal and wanted them to grow here, even if by magic.  I flunked trying to keep these alive, whether large-ones directly from Texas or smaller.  I could get about 3-4 years out of them before they floundered.  I had trunk rot every time.     
  6. SABAL RIVERSIDE.   I have tried several of these and they are promising.  Who would've thunk?!   I don't protect them and they do get winter damage but can pull out of it.  Any long-termers (5+ yrs) out there???  I killed my largest because I had to transplant it.  Sabals do not like to be moved.  However, one of my transplants is at my current home and is picking up where it left off.  Time will tell. 
  7. SABAL 'LISA'.  I had a nice-sized one (10-15 gal) growing probably 4-5 years (no protection) and it was healthy.  Had to transplant it, and it hated me for that and bit the dust.  I will be trialing another that I am growing up in a pot in a few years.   

I'll mention the other Sabals I've trialed both protected and unprotected with zero success for even short or long-term or teenage years survival.  There are a few more that I've not tried and will not.

Burmudana. Short timer.

Causiarum.  Short-termer.

Domingensis.  Short-timer.

Etonia.  For me, couldn't keep them alive, but others in my area have had better success.

Pumos.  2 years max.(protected)

Rosei.  3 yrs max (protected)

Uresana. 4-5 years.  This palm is very pretty.  Not protected.

Miamiensis.   2-3 yrs.  

 

WASHYS

  1. FILIFERA.  Good for a couple of years while they were small and the crown is underground.  Difficult to find large plants that might survive or that were pure filifera, so my tests were only of 1-5 ga. sizes.   None survived more than 3-4 years for me.  Was sold many "pure" ones the turned out to be not true.
  2. ROBUSTA.  Fun to play with.  All of mine, varying sizes when planted, perished quickly...1-3 yrs max.   
  3. FILIBUSTA.   Without winter protection, did not last long.  However, I managed to protect one for nearly 10 years, (started it as a seedling) and it grew quickly (9-10' tall and giant leaves).  I could no longer get a canopy over the thing, and it perished after the following winter.   Made me nearly cry.

MISC. KEEPERS

  1. NEEDLE.   Of course these are long-termers.  Just visit JC Raulston aroboretum in Raleigh to see a survivor from the 80's.   These are darn-finicky if thrown into the ground as a seedling.   I've killed more needle palms because they were too small than I want to remember.

OTHER PALMS I'VE TRIED AND FAILED

  1. BUTIA CAPITATA (I forget the new name for this.).   I managed to keep one alive for about 8 years before it mets its demise.  I've watched butias grown around this area.  Not many seem to have made it long-term, even ones that I thought may have been 10 yrs old. I'm not sure if the one in downtown Raleigh parking lot is still kicking or not.  That one is growing in the middle of a paved parking lot.  Anyone know?
  2. CHAMAEROPS HUMULIS.   I wanted so badly to make these live, but wishing for it didn't make it happen.  I've probably tried several dozen of varying sizes.  Max of 3 years with no protection.   Maybe it's just me......
  3. NANNORHOPS RICHTIANA.  None of the dozen or so I've planted became long-termers.  I did get more than a few years from each one trialed.  I gave one to a friend and that one is still alive. (go figure).  Mine were protected.
  4. SERENOA REPENS.  Why of why can't I keep these alive.  (sounds like a song..)   No long-terms for me with and without protection.
  5. TRITHRINAX CAMPESTRIS.   Tried varying sizes.  Had a beautiful large one, put in a desert bed, covered it to keep moisture out, ..dead in 2 years.
  6. CHAMEDOREA MICROSPADIX or RADICALUS.  Not sure what I've been doing wrong, but some friends have managed to keep theirs alive longer than a few years.

PALMS I SHOULDN'T BE GROWING BUT AM STUBBORN

1. JUBAEA CHILENSIS.  I am down to one jubaea, but it is a beauty (see my thread about NC jubaea).  This palm gets covered and added supplemental heat each winter.   I only turn the heat on when the weather is expected to drop below 15f.  The leaves on a jub definitely will take single digits without browning out.  Added heat keeps the palm at least 15 if we go into single digits.  I have killed at least 2 dozen of these.......  You can not plant out a seedling or even a 5 gal and expect them to live (even with protection).  They have to be grown up to a larger size before planting.

2. JUB x BUTIA.  Leaves are cold tolerate like it's dad.   Needs protection.

3. BUTIA X JUB.  Leaves are not cold tolerate, more like it's mom.  Pretty palm.   I don't know of anyone keeping these alive in z7 without protection.  Mine will someday be too large to protect.  I think the one at Gary's Nursery (z8) may still be alive, not sure about its age, but definitely more than 5 yr.

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C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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I realize that I have not listed Trachys in the above post.  T

.fortunei--long termers.  

Waggies--seem to be long-termers.

Any other Trachy...I've failed at keeping anything longer than 5 yrs.   

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C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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Great info. Thanks

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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 I like your never give up on Palms attitude =) Do you have a pic of your Birmingham or Riverside ?

T J 

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Nice Info.  I would have figured the palmetto would do better.  Did you ever try a Sabal Louisiana?

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/@tntropics - 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size, 3 dwarf),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), etonia (1) louisiana(5), palmetto (1), riverside (1),  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows -1F, 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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2 hours ago, Allen said:

Nice Info.  I would have figured the palmetto would do better.  Did you ever try a Sabal Louisiana?

yes.  Forgot about that one.  Similar to x-texensis in terms of hardiness.   I probably missed a few other ones, too.  

 

4 hours ago, OC2Texaspalmlvr said:

 I like your never give up on Palms attitude =) Do you have a pic of your Birmingham or Riverside ?

LOL.   I probably have photos...would have to dig.  

C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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6 hours ago, NCpalmqueen said:

I realize that I have not listed Trachys in the above post.  T

.fortunei--long termers.  

Waggies--seem to be long-termers.

Any other Trachy...I've failed at keeping anything longer than 5 yrs.   

Adding onto the list as my brain recalls these:

Brahea armata.   Must be kept dry in winter so needs a cover.  I think I got one to live about 4 years max.

Brahea clara.   This one is a beauty.  With protection, it lived about 4 years until I had to dug it up and transplant to another house.  Braheas HATE being moved.   End of story.  :-(   I am growing up another one to try in my current location.   I love this palm.

 

C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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Very good information! Thank you for sharing this, if you have pictures, please post! 

PalmTreeDude

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What were the temperatures that killed the coastal NC sabal palmettos? I was thinking about getting one, I was just wondering at what temperature I should protect it. This is all good information, I like how many palms you’ve experimented with!

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1 hour ago, sevapalms said:

What were the temperatures that killed the coastal NC sabal palmettos? I was thinking about getting one, I was just wondering at what temperature I should protect it. This is all good information, I like how many palms you’ve experimented with!

Sorry.   I didn't log any of that.   You can look up the RDU (Raleigh/Durham) stats to see what we've had the past 15-20 years.  What I've found is that the palmettos start a slow decline (barely noticeable) after a bad winter.  I didn't protect them, so I don't know if that would've helped.  Each year after a winter, they silently struggle to produce a canopy especially if their leaves burned out.   I think the winters here inland, which aren't really that long here, are too long and too cold for palmettos.  I've watched the temps at the coast (z8a/b) and compared to my locale.  Always warmer with few exceptions, i.e. those nasty coastal storms.  Since you're in 8a (close to water?), you have a better chance; however,  I don't know your climate.  Find the best microclimate you can and the biggest rooted/potted one possible and plant in the hottest place.   Not sure what Gary has.

 

Will dig into photos today since it is too freakin hot outside to go out and play in the garden.

 

p.s.   Forgot to add Phoenix theophrastii to my list.   I raised two beautiful ones from seed, put them in the ground at a young age, did cover them for winter, and they thrived for about 5 years.   Then *bam*!, they died.   I cried.  Beautiful palms.  Needs an extreme microclimate under some type of canopy to survive.   

Forget about Phoenix dactylifera and canariensis.  Pretty for 2 years....maybe.

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C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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28 minutes ago, NCpalmqueen said:

Sorry.   I didn't log any of that.   You can look up the RDU (Raleigh/Durham) stats to see what we've had the past 15-20 years.  What I've found is that the palmettos start a slow decline (barely noticeable) after a bad winter.  I didn't protect them, so I don't know if that would've helped.  Each year after a winter, they silently struggle to produce a canopy especially if their leaves burned out.   I think the winters here inland, which aren't really that long here, are too long and too cold for palmettos.  I've watched the temps at the coast (z8a/b) and compared to my locale.  Always warmer with few exceptions, i.e. those nasty coastal storms.  Since you're in 8a (close to water?), you have a better chance; however,  I don't know your climate.  Find the best microclimate you can and the biggest rooted/potted one possible and plant in the hottest place.   Not sure what Gary has.

 

Will dig into photos today since it is too freakin hot outside to go out and play in the garden.

 

p.s.   Forgot to add Phoenix theophrastii to my list.   I raised two beautiful ones from seed, put them in the ground at a young age, did cover them for winter, and they thrived for about 5 years.   Then *bam*!, they died.   I cried.  Beautiful palms.  Needs an extreme microclimate under some type of canopy to survive.   

Forget about Phoenix dactylifera and canariensis.  Pretty for 2 years....maybe.

That’s fine! It looks like RDU keeps good records, so I’ll look at the winter lows.

Thanks for the palmetto tips, once I get a healthy one I’ll keep your tips in mind.

My climate is more moderated by the water, so I have cooler summers and warmer winters than inland. It’s not too much cooler in summer then inland unless a sea breeze comes in, and the only time I’ve seen it colder here during the winter than inland is during coastal storms, like you said. I think sabal palmettos would have a good chance here, but the only one I have, which is in a pot, just got spear pull from rot. I think Gary’s Nursery in New Bern currently has 3 gallon (???) potted ones, so I’ll probably go down there later this summer and check out what he has.

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3 hours ago, NCpalmqueen said:

Sorry.   I didn't log any of that.   You can look up the RDU (Raleigh/Durham) stats to see what we've had the past 15-20 years.  What I've found is that the palmettos start a slow decline (barely noticeable) after a bad winter.  I didn't protect them, so I don't know if that would've helped.  Each year after a winter, they silently struggle to produce a canopy especially if their leaves burned out.   I think the winters here inland, which aren't really that long here, are too long and too cold for palmettos.  I've watched the temps at the coast (z8a/b) and compared to my locale.  Always warmer with few exceptions, i.e. those nasty coastal storms.  Since you're in 8a (close to water?), you have a better chance; however,  I don't know your climate.  Find the best microclimate you can and the biggest rooted/potted one possible and plant in the hottest place.   Not sure what Gary has.

 

Will dig into photos today since it is too freakin hot outside to go out and play in the garden.

 

p.s.   Forgot to add Phoenix theophrastii to my list.   I raised two beautiful ones from seed, put them in the ground at a young age, did cover them for winter, and they thrived for about 5 years.   Then *bam*!, they died.   I cried.  Beautiful palms.  Needs an extreme microclimate under some type of canopy to survive.   

Forget about Phoenix dactylifera and canariensis.  Pretty for 2 years....maybe.

I enjoyed reading the report on your theophrasti.  It took a beating before it went.  I have 10 of them in the yard at this point.

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone (2012): 9b | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (1985, 1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a | 30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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7 hours ago, sevapalms said:

That’s fine! It looks like RDU keeps good records, so I’ll look at the winter lows.

Thanks for the palmetto tips, once I get a healthy one I’ll keep your tips in mind.

My climate is more moderated by the water, so I have cooler summers and warmer winters than inland. It’s not too much cooler in summer then inland unless a sea breeze comes in, and the only time I’ve seen it colder here during the winter than inland is during coastal storms, like you said. I think sabal palmettos would have a good chance here, but the only one I have, which is in a pot, just got spear pull from rot. I think Gary’s Nursery in New Bern currently has 3 gallon (???) potted ones, so I’ll probably go down there later this summer and check out what he has.

You're welcome.   Sounds like you have a shot at keeping palmettos alive for more than one winter.  Best of luck to you.  Are there palmettos there that have been around awhile?

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C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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4 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

I enjoyed reading the report on your theophrasti.  It took a beating before it went.  I have 10 of them in the yard at this point.

Thanks.   I will try to find photos of them before their demise.   Lucky you to have 10!!  What zone are you in?

C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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1 minute ago, NCpalmqueen said:

Thanks.   I will try to find photos of them before their demise.   Lucky you to have 10!!  What zone are you in?

Officially, 9b - Lakeland, FL.  I actually had just mailed out a bunch of them to NC, SC, GA, NM before I started putting them in the ground.   I started with 26 of them since every seed I got from my friend in Greece sprouted.

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone (2012): 9b | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (1985, 1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a | 30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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Slowly digging into many archives of photos......

Here is another palm I forgot about and not in the list above, Brahea decumbens.  I paid a pretty penny for this and it grew wonderfully.  Covered in the winter.  Seemed to love our hot summers.  As with everything else, when I moved, everything got transplanted.  :violin:

i-FqDwFJX-M.jpg

 

I think this was m ySabal bermudana......  perhaps someone can ID it.

i-gqkrxhg-M.jpg

 

Here is a Trachycarpus 'Naga Hills" with silver backside.  This one never really liked me.  No protection.  It barely grew more than 1 or 2 leaves a year.  Not sure what the cause of its discontent was.  Soil?  Sun? Temps?  Winter?   

i-bwM6wXC-M.jpg

 

My filibusta while young.   Grew it up from a seedling.  

i-FsRH4LB-M.jpg

 

Tony Avant (Plant Delights) came  to see my palms.(2010)  He was surprised by the diversity......(before we moved).

i-2Hk6MwN-M.jpg

 

more pics to come later....

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C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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Amazing! Thank you for sharing.

5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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3 hours ago, NCpalmqueen said:

You're welcome.   Sounds like you have a shot at keeping palmettos alive for more than one winter.  Best of luck to you.  Are there palmettos there that have been around awhile?

There are very few mature palmettos that have survived for a decade or more outside of inland Virginia Beach/Norfolk in southeastern Virginia, probably more because of a lack of trying/maintenance than the lack of a good climate. I know@VA Jeff kept a few trunking sabal species alive in my area for an extended period of time, some of which are likely still alive, so I know that it can be done. In inland Virginia Beach and Norfolk, there are some palmettos that have survived long-term, likely hurricane-cut palmettos that got lucky. I think that if people tried pot-grown palmettos in my area, they would survive at a much higher rate than hurricane cut ones. Trachycarpus is bulletproof in my area, so most people when choosing trunking palms, that is what they choose.

I don’t have any good pictures of palmettos, but these are some Trachycarpus that have been here for more than 5 years, and have survived single digit temperatures. Some of these have likely been here since the ‘80s.607A0F7C-06C6-41D7-9D2E-B8E16179341E.thumb.jpeg.e2827940c646a24dc06e7aee026fe4c6.jpeg

343727ED-DADD-4359-8E3F-8E6D61AC30A6.thumb.jpeg.35b0408ebbab9f61c15c459d0123117f.jpegBC6FC112-653D-41E3-9EFB-0BA6CCF873BF.thumb.jpeg.33da70147603a91d34ff0c0f16dfa5a7.jpeg8D438BAE-2606-4715-A926-C22EFB481D1F.thumb.jpeg.f378bf3e6ce19169c3d0abd6c10ed5f2.jpeg

On some palms there are protection methods, but they are likely not needed.

 

 

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Nice pics all

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YouTube https://www.youtube.com/@tntropics - 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size, 3 dwarf),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), etonia (1) louisiana(5), palmetto (1), riverside (1),  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows -1F, 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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The only long term trunking palms that work in zone 7a/b here are trachycarpus. Even then they need a decent placement.

 

20171231_164728.thumb.jpg.45fe8e2c6368414de5743a01f0d3c271.jpg5b0a17f321491_summer2014.PNG.787957acf10b4bce2a6249308da28f22.PNGScreenshot_20181211-165348_Google.thumb.jpg.fcbb63bc5cc03ed1fadfcc1c3f860160.jpg

 

Even then they are so few and far between as asking anyone here about palms and it's pots no go. Hoping I can get some long term ones in my new garden, but seriously doubt I will once we get slammed in a few years or so... I applaud your dedication to zone pushing and I hope to regain such motivation one day.

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LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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Thanks for sharing @NCpalmqueen.  Very informative! 

I never had problems with Chamerops and Serenoa in the eastern part of the state. And after thinking about it, I don't remember ever seeing any specimens of those palms in the NC Piedmont, besides for a very small Serenoa repens that I saw planted at the UNC Chapel Hill Botanical Garden last November. 

Here in Greenville, Chamaerops is a fairly common palm that is seemingly becoming more popular. I think Serenoa might need sandy soil for longterm survival though, but I just planted my silver variety last spring so I guess I will have to wait and see if my theory holds true or not.  

Zone 8a/8b Greenville, NC 

Zone 9a/9b Bluffton, SC

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9 hours ago, NC_Palms said:

I never had problems with Chamerops and Serenoa in the eastern part of the state.

Lucky You!!!  I've tried planting Serenoa (silver and green)  in pure sand, mixed sand and loam, and mixed with our topsoil & clay with large and smaller specimens.   I gave up.  They were 2-3 years max for me.    

11 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

The only long term trunking palms that work in zone 7a/b here are trachycarpus.

Birminghams do eventually trunk and would work there, too.  Nice photos.  Where exactly is 'hell on earth'?

 

11 hours ago, sevapalms said:

re are very few mature palmettos that have survived for a decade or more outside of inland Virginia Beach/Norfol

Survival of the fittest.  Those trachys are impressive.  I had to leave all of my trachys that size back at the ole homestead.  :(  Not sure what type of protection method that was in the last photo.

 

Will dig into more photos in a bit.  Too hot already to go outside for me.  Humidity/dew points in the 70s.  We need rain.   

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C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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Maryland. And yeah any sabal minor that eventually trunks should work here.

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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2 hours ago, NCpalmqueen said:

Not sure what type of protection method that was in the last photo.

I’m not sure either. They put it up in the winter and take it down in the spring, so it’s probably a form of protection. I’m not sure what it is though, but it looked kind of like frost cloth. It most likely doesn’t do much though.

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Thank you for sharing your observations. I’m also in 7b, but I’m in New York so our winters differ quite a bit. The only palms here that are proven to be bulletproof in any setting are Needles and Minors. Trachycarpus fortunei, to my knowledge, has only been trialed in less-than-ideal settings such as out in the open and along north-facing walls and don’t last more than a few years, but even in the most ideal setting they’d still probably be marginal at best.

I’ve no in-ground palms but I have all the hardiest stuff in pots, I hope to plant them eventually. I’d also like to try a Birmingham and a Jubaea (with protection).

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Pictures from the archive.   Most but not all bit the dust after transplanting or a mean winter.  Looking at these reminded me of what sizes they were and how quickly they grew.   

Phoenix theophrastii.  One of two twins grown from seed.

i-43qvDtH-M.jpg

 

Trithrinax campestris

 i-Q53Jk62-M.jpg

Brahea Clara after winter

i-GPGnrk7-M.jpg

clara in bloom

i-M33cmFM-M.jpg

 

Brahea armata 

i-6f3FfB3-M.jpg

 

Chamaeorops in front

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Butia capitata  grown from a 3 gal plant.  At about year 7, it became too big to protect although we tried.  Was probably after the first unprotected winter that it passed into palm heaven.

i-fqhxsgk-M.jpg

 

Washy prior to being moved.  

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Moved to next location.  Dead in one year after.

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Nannorhops

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Sabal Lisa.  The size is deceiving.

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Trachycarpus "Greensboro".   I swear that this is the hardiest of the fortuneiis...on par with "Bulgaria".   I never cut leaves off unless they have no green left on them.   Didn't have to cut much on this one.   I miss this palm. It should be still alive at the old homestead.  Grown from a tiny seedling put directly into the ground!

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Sabal "Bald Head island" giant.  From this photo it looks like BHI palmetto, but it could just be a giant BHI minor.  I forget.

i-qHfsgSt-M.jpg

 

normal Palmetto.  Of all the palmettos grown, this one was still alive when we moved.  It was the fattest  one (hurricane cut) of the bunch when I picked it out.  No protection.

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Another hurricane cut Florida palmetto.  (in the background)  Dead in about 6-7 years.

i-DvZFVWm-M.jpg

 

Two palms from PDN planted when they were strappers.  On the left is Sabal minor "McCurtain"--possibly the slowest growing palm on earth....

and the right is Sabal palmetto " Tifton".  Both were alive when I moved and left them there.

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And finally (am all photo'd out), this is what my washy filibusta once looked like before.............

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this..........

complete and total collapse.......

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..still searching for my other sabals.....

Birminghams today....starting over with a circle of 6.

i-s9FX7dd-M.jpg

 

  • Like 7
  • Upvote 1

C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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4 hours ago, cm05 said:

Thank you for sharing your observations.

You're welcome.   Best of luck with planting trachys.  Find your best microclimate.

 

19 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Thank you for sharing.

My pleasure.

C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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12 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

Maryland. And yeah any sabal minor that eventually trunks should work here.

Whats so bad about Maryland? Lol. I think its a nice state

6 hours ago, NCpalmqueen said:

Sabal "Bald Head island" giant.  From this photo it looks like BHI palmetto, but it could just be a giant BHI minor.  I forget.

i-qHfsgSt-M.jpg

That looks like a Sabal palmetto. The leaves seem to be costapalmate. 

Zone 8a/8b Greenville, NC 

Zone 9a/9b Bluffton, SC

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Wow you really had some nice palms!  that's awesome.

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/@tntropics - 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size, 3 dwarf),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), etonia (1) louisiana(5), palmetto (1), riverside (1),  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows -1F, 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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So much heartbreak and yet you keep up the good fight. I will be following to see the growth on your S.Birmingham's =)

T J 

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  • 2 weeks later...

What a great read. So sorry to see that filibusta break... that must have been a major bummer! I was wondering what your favorite yuccas and agaves are, currently. I agree they make great palm companion plants!
:)

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On 6/10/2019 at 11:27 AM, RJ said:

@NCpalmqueen  Do you still have your JxS? 

Never had a JxS.  I had a JxBxS that did wonderfully (protected) until I had to move it.  It hated me.   :-(

 

C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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6 minutes ago, NCpalmqueen said:

Never had a JxS.  I had a JxBxS that did wonderfully (protected) until I had to move it.  It hated me.   :-(

 

Sorry to hear your JxBxS didn't make it. I thought I had read here that you had JxS and SxJ. That's why I asked.

 

 

Edited by RJ
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15 minutes ago, RJ said:

I thought I had read here that you had JxS and SxJ. That's why I asked.

LOL.   I guess I had them then!   Honestly, it is all a blur as to what palms I trialed before I moved twice.  I know I tried probably most of what Patrick had available over the years., including things like parajubaea......sooo pretty...sooo not this zone.

    Have I met you, RJ?   

C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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14 hours ago, Swolte said:

I was wondering what your favorite yuccas and agaves are, currently. I agree they make great palm companion plants!

Now that topic is a *happy* topic.   The yuccas I have are thriving, even after being moved twice.   Lemme get some photos this afternoon to go along with my list.   Of course, growing yuccas/agaves in Texas must be delightful!   Your pallet is probably endless!!  Not so here, but still quite satisfying.

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C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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7 minutes ago, NCpalmqueen said:

LOL.   I guess I had them then!   Honestly, it is all a blur as to what palms I trialed before I moved twice.  I know I tried probably most of what Patrick had available over the years., including things like parajubaea......sooo pretty...sooo not this zone.

    Have I met you, RJ?   

Oh, quite all right B)

I've ready most of your posts as you probably have more experience growing different palms in the Carolina's then anyone on the board. :greenthumb:

No I don't believe we have ever met, although I did live in the Cary area about 13 or so years ago, it was a brief stint less then a year and had zero interest in palms at the time. 

 

 

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51 minutes ago, RJ said:

I've ready most of your posts as you probably have more experience growing different palms in the Carolina's then anyone on the board. :greenthumb:

I think I might re-word that to "more experience KILLING palms in the Carolina's than anyone...."

52 minutes ago, RJ said:

I did live in the Cary area about 13 or so years ago, it was a brief stint less then a year and had zero interest in palms at the time. 

I taught fitness classes in Cary and have many palm friends there.   You're in a much better area now for palm tree growing...a solid 8.  Am jealous!!

C from NC

:)

Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

Siler City, NC

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Here is a trachy just a few miles from my house after a cold winter. I saw it a few weeks ago and it now goes over the roof of the house and has a complete fully green crown. 

Screenshot_20180831-134202_Snapchat.jpg

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PalmTreeDude

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