Jump to content

Low Humidity


bubba
 Share

Recommended Posts

My geographic location is in the extreme eastern part of the America’s continent and our local weather here depends totally on the Atlantic breeze, eternally blowing from the east, as the planet rotates...(Recife gets the first sunshine rays everyday in the continental new world).  Right now temperature is 23°C (73°F), after a high of 27°C (81°F). The humidity is at 100% as it has been raining with skies mostly covered for the last 4 consecutive days. This is actually the rainiest month here with average (well distributed)  233 mm (9.19 inches), sometimes much more…but then sometimes it stops for almost a week and summer is suddenly back… For both people and plants, our winter here is just as pleasant as paradise…

Check the Recife weather

During our 7 months looong  summer, here at 8 degrees latitude south, a miracle happens: the humidity suddenly lowers, but still the breeze blowing from the sea (above 26°C  water) naturally “air conditioners” and regulates back the climate, allowing us not to cook our brains up in total clear sunshine. Here in December the average max is just 89°F (average low of 79°F), never reaching a hundred, even though the yellow torch is well lit above our heads. It is usually fresh and warm from 11 AM to 3 PM and then we have marvelous dry and breezy afternoons and evenings.  Another good thing about the tropics is that we never have real long days or real long nights anytime during the year, and I believe this helps to stabilize the extremes.

If we travel 90 Km to the west, to uphill towns at 800 meters elevation, where most families of the middle class here are buying property and planning to move in the future, the temperature now is certainly less than 18°C (64°F) and humidity less than half comparing to our coastal lowland by the sea. It is very comfortable there in winter but It feels more like in North Texas during the whole summer...

I’d say that the ideal for my region would be spending the winter uphill ( less rain and lower temps) and come by the nice South Atlantic waters from September on to check the recent palms growth (and start watering them up more frequently)…Vegetable life here goes fast and humidity plays the leading role in this process…

Sirinhaém beach, 80 Km south of Recife - Brazil

Tropical oceanic climate, latitude 8° S

Temperature extremes: 25 to 31°C

2000 mm average rainfall, dry summers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like visiting the heat and humidity. That's about it. You think S. Fla is humid in the summer??? Try New York City in the middle of August....waiting on the platform for a subway. No breeze, humidity about 1000% and all those people. Yuck! Add in the suit I used to wear. South Florida in August begins to look pretty good. Did that for a few years.

I remember flying from LAX (where I was living at the time) to Orlando. After leaving the airport I felt as if I was  hit in the face with a club as the humidity and heat were oppressive. Humidity is great for tropical plants though. No doubt about that.

I like the weather here in San Diego best though.

Coastal San Diego, California

Z10b

Dry summer subtropical/Mediterranean

warm summer/mild winter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One final word, the AZ sun is very potent, much more potent in heatng your body(70% water) than any coastal California area, or florida.  The lack of humidity/clouds means that sunlight that heats water(you are 70% water) is not filtered at all by the atmosphere.  You need to drink alot of water(1 gal/day) to prevent from being dehydrated here.  Humidity in the atmosphere is mostly less than 15% in april-july.  I've seen 6% several times this spring.  If you work in direct mid day to late day sun in the hot season, it will take you down.  There is a reason that people take siestas in the middle of the day, the sun is too hot, it will cook you if you dont seek out shade.

I'll take the humidity of Florida anyday over that dry, dehydrating heat... I was out there 2 years ago in the middle of summer, and I literally had to carry a water bottle around with me - not fun..  I don't mind sweating, so when I lived in FL... I used to excercise during the middle of the day and I had no problem.

Bobby

Long Island, New York  Zone 7a (where most of the southern Floridians are originally from)

AVERAGE TEMPS

Summer Highs  : 85-90f/day,  68-75f / night

Winter Lows     : 38-45f/day,   25-35f / night

Extreme Low    : 10-20f/day,    0-10f / night   but VERY RARE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(epicure3 @ Jun. 14 2007,02:06)

QUOTE
I like visiting the heat and humidity. That's about it. You think S. Fla is humid in the summer??? Try New York City in the middle of August....waiting on the platform for a subway. No breeze, humidity about 1000% and all those people. Yuck! Add in the suit I used to wear. South Florida in August begins to look pretty good. Did that for a few years.

I remember flying from LAX (where I was living at the time) to Orlando. After leaving the airport I felt as if I was  hit in the face with a club as the humidity and heat were oppressive. Humidity is great for tropical plants though. No doubt about that.

I like the weather here in San Diego best though.

Sorry, NYC is not more hot/humid that for example, Orlando FL.  It isn't even close.  Sure NYC can get hot/humid with upper 90s and heat index's in the 100s easily.  But it lasts for a couple days, maybe a week, max.  2 weeks in and extremely bad heat wave.  Whereas in FL, you will have heat index's near/over 100f for month after month, after month, after month, until sometime in late Oct when that first cool front comes thru.  And even then the heat is not over with.  I lived in Central FL for 5 yrs, so I am pretty familiar the heat and humidity.  Don't forget, In FL, while the coast may be "cool" at 92F, the interior of FL is very frequently in the 95-99F range with high humidity to boot.

Doesn't really bother me though, I love heat and humidity.  I like working outside in it even though you sweat a ton.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, NYC is not more hot/humid that for example, Orlando FL.  It isn't even close.  Sure NYC can get hot/humid with upper 90s and heat index's in the 100s easily.  But it lasts for a couple days, maybe a week, max.  2 weeks in and extremely bad heat wave.  Whereas in FL, you will have heat index's near/over 100f for month after month, after month, after month, until sometime in late Oct when that first cool front comes thru.  And even then the heat is not over with.  I lived in Central FL for 5 yrs, so I am pretty familiar the heat and humidity.  Don't forget, In FL, while the coast may be "cool" at 92F, the interior of FL is very frequently in the 95-99F range with high humidity to boot.

Doesn't really bother me though, I love heat and humidity.  I like working outside in it even though you sweat a ton

Jim,

While I never lived in Orlando, I did live in South Florida for 6 years - Ft. Laud to be exact, so I'm very familiar with that area - and having lived on Long Island for most of my life, I can say that the heat in June/July/August in New York can be more stifiling than Ft. Lauderdale in the same period. I think this might have to do with the breeze that you get off of the caribbean - not sure.... I can't say I remember too much about being in Central FL in the summer, but I'm going down to Tampa next month and driving down to Ft. Laud, so I'll let you know when I come back.

Bobby

Long Island, New York  Zone 7a (where most of the southern Floridians are originally from)

AVERAGE TEMPS

Summer Highs  : 85-90f/day,  68-75f / night

Winter Lows     : 38-45f/day,   25-35f / night

Extreme Low    : 10-20f/day,    0-10f / night   but VERY RARE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(BobbyinNY @ Jun. 14 2007,10:17)

QUOTE
One final word, the AZ sun is very potent, much more potent in heatng your body(70% water) than any coastal California area, or florida.  The lack of humidity/clouds means that sunlight that heats water(you are 70% water) is not filtered at all by the atmosphere.  You need to drink alot of water(1 gal/day) to prevent from being dehydrated here.  Humidity in the atmosphere is mostly less than 15% in april-july.  I've seen 6% several times this spring.  If you work in direct mid day to late day sun in the hot season, it will take you down.  There is a reason that people take siestas in the middle of the day, the sun is too hot, it will cook you if you dont seek out shade.

I'll take the humidity of Florida anyday over that dry, dehydrating heat... I was out there 2 years ago in the middle of summer, and I literally had to carry a water bottle around with me - not fun..  I don't mind sweating, so when I lived in FL... I used to excercise during the middle of the day and I had no problem.

different weather systems are best handled by different behaviors.  I have been to NYC many times in the summer, its oppressive, but definitely not as hot(heat index) as orlando area(next to hell) in july/august.  An additional stress in NYC is air quality, which can be very poor when there is no breeze.  The poor air quality stresses the respiratory system further.  Heat and humidity stress the cardiovascular system by limiting the bodys ability to cool itself by sweat evaporation.  

People who are exposed to phoenix weather lose water through the skin quickly(not the sweat glands), but it cools the blood at the same time as it rapidly evaporates.  Drops of sweat hardly even accumulate on the skin outside the humid monsoon season except for a really physical workout.  This is why it is possible to exercise more rigouously, work out longer, here than in NYC or florida in the summer.  It is also why you need to drink more water.  The mornings are generally 25-35 degrees cooler than the daytime highs, so if you sleep late you lose out on the best part of the day in summer.  Also keeping out of the sun after say 1pm prevents cooking.  When our humidity rises to 45-50% in late july/august it can lead to  a heat index like florida, and feel even hotter in the (more)direct sun.  This is how you identify tourists, they are out in the afternoon in the sun during that time, locals know better.  

In balance I will take the AZ winters, warmer and drier than socal, and the AZ summers with their nasty 6-8 week monsoon season(high heat index) over being cold in winter and stifiling humidity in summer back east.  I can visit san diego, the grand canyon(-25-30 degrees), and vegas within 5 +/- hours drive if I want to leave the area.  Hawaii would be much better than here, and florida is superior to grow palms, but AZ has some advantageous economics, and my job is here.   But, ... I rather be in hawaii.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(BobbyinNY @ Jun. 14 2007,11:16)

QUOTE
Sorry, NYC is not more hot/humid that for example, Orlando FL.  It isn't even close.  Sure NYC can get hot/humid with upper 90s and heat index's in the 100s easily.  But it lasts for a couple days, maybe a week, max.  2 weeks in and extremely bad heat wave.  Whereas in FL, you will have heat index's near/over 100f for month after month, after month, after month, until sometime in late Oct when that first cool front comes thru.  And even then the heat is not over with.  I lived in Central FL for 5 yrs, so I am pretty familiar the heat and humidity.  Don't forget, In FL, while the coast may be "cool" at 92F, the interior of FL is very frequently in the 95-99F range with high humidity to boot.

Doesn't really bother me though, I love heat and humidity.  I like working outside in it even though you sweat a ton

Jim,

While I never lived in Orlando, I did live in South Florida for 6 years - Ft. Laud to be exact, so I'm very familiar with that area - and having lived on Long Island for most of my life, I can say that the heat in June/July/August in New York can be more stifiling than Ft. Lauderdale in the same period. I think this might have to do with the breeze that you get off of the caribbean - not sure.... I can't say I remember too much about being in Central FL in the summer, but I'm going down to Tampa next month and driving down to Ft. Laud, so I'll let you know when I come back.

Bobby,

While I don't disagree that is true for short stretches, I don't think you can compare the 2 over the entire summer.  For example, you guys are in the 60s and 70s today - you would never see that in summer in Florida.  Here is a comparison of Average Temperatures of Lakeland FL (interior Florida) and NYC from APR thru OCT.   Not trying to dispute anyone, but there really is no comparison.

Lakeland FL                                   NYC

April      86.0° F 61.0°              60.0° F 45.0° F

 

May      91.0° F 67.0°              71.0° F 55.0° F

 

June     94.0° F 72.0°              79.0° F 64.0° F

 

July       95.0° F 73.0°             85.0° F 70.0°

 

August  94.0° F 74.0°             83.0° F 69.0° F

 

September 92.0° F 73.0°        76.0° F 61.0° F

 

October 87.0° F 66.0°             65.0° F 50.0° F

http://weather.yahoo.com/climo/USFL0267_f.html

http://weather.yahoo.com/climo/USNY0996_f.html

According to the averages from Weather.com, NYC is a full 10-20F cooler in the hottest months, (May-Sep), Even in the hottenst months of July and Aug, NYC averages about 10-11 degrees cooler than interior FL.  At the coast it would be more like 5-6 degrees.  Of course NY can get much hotter than the averages, but so can interior FL.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bobby,

While I don't disagree that is true for short stretches, I don't think you can compare the 2 over the entire summer.  For example, you guys are in the 60s and 70s today - you would never see that in summer in Florida.  Here is a comparison of Average Temperatures of Lakeland FL (interior Florida) and NYC from APR thru OCT.   Not trying to dispute anyone, but there really is no comparison.

I'm sure for the most part you're correct, Jim.. I'm just going by how I remember it feeling when I lived down there and comparing it to here...... Oh, and the last 2 days here have been extremely  abnormal with temps hovering in the mid-high 60's.. but it'll be in the high 80's to around 90f by sunday night.

Bobby

Long Island, New York  Zone 7a (where most of the southern Floridians are originally from)

AVERAGE TEMPS

Summer Highs  : 85-90f/day,  68-75f / night

Winter Lows     : 38-45f/day,   25-35f / night

Extreme Low    : 10-20f/day,    0-10f / night   but VERY RARE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One little thing that nobody mentioned is ... our rainy season! From June onward we have rain pretty much every afternoon to cool things off.

Rainy season is best during the summer; I want my winters on the dry side (but not too dry).

My palms are happy, and I am happy.

The weather back in PR is pretty much like Gileno's. Trade winds regulate the high temps and they rarely if ever go above low 90's on the coast during summer, staying mostly in the 80s. Only the difference between high and low is about 10 degrees F.

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(BobbyinNY @ Jun. 14 2007,16:10)

QUOTE
Bobby,

While I don't disagree that is true for short stretches, I don't think you can compare the 2 over the entire summer.  For example, you guys are in the 60s and 70s today - you would never see that in summer in Florida.  Here is a comparison of Average Temperatures of Lakeland FL (interior Florida) and NYC from APR thru OCT.   Not trying to dispute anyone, but there really is no comparison.

I'm sure for the most part you're correct, Jim.. I'm just going by how I remember it feeling when I lived down there and comparing it to here...... Oh, and the last 2 days here have been extremely  abnormal with temps hovering in the mid-high 60's.. but it'll be in the high 80's to around 90f by sunday night.

You're right, I know it gets etremely hot and humid in NY (and anywhere in the midwest/southeast for that matter).  It just seems to last a lot longer in FL...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(Trópico @ Jun. 14 2007,18:37)

QUOTE
One little thing that nobody mentioned is ... our rainy season! From June onward we have rain pretty much every afternoon to cool things off.

Rainy season is best during the summer; I want my winters on the dry side (but not too dry).

My palms are happy, and I am happy.

The weather back in PR is pretty much like Gileno's. Trade winds regulate the high temps and they rarely if ever go above low 90's on the coast during summer, staying mostly in the 80s. Only the difference between high and low is about 10 degrees F.

From what I remember of the 5 years I lived in FL, rain doesn't "cool" anything off in the summer.  If anything it makes it more humid and more sauna like - like walking into a steam room after the storm passed.  Well, that's what I remember anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(syersj @ Jun. 14 2007,19:01)

QUOTE

(Trópico @ Jun. 14 2007,18:37)

QUOTE
One little thing that nobody mentioned is ... our rainy season! From June onward we have rain pretty much every afternoon to cool things off.

Rainy season is best during the summer; I want my winters on the dry side (but not too dry).

My palms are happy, and I am happy.

The weather back in PR is pretty much like Gileno's. Trade winds regulate the high temps and they rarely if ever go above low 90's on the coast during summer, staying mostly in the 80s. Only the difference between high and low is about 10 degrees F.

From what I remember of the 5 years I lived in FL, rain doesn't "cool" anything off in the summer.  If anything it makes it more humid and more sauna like - like walking into a steam room after the storm passed.  Well, that's what I remember anyway.

if the humidity is low, rain will cool by falling and evaporation.  In AZ when it rains in the summer, the temps can cool off by up to 25 degrees in one hour.  Some cooling should occur when it rains in FLA, but it might not FEEL much cooler.  High humidity really blunts the cooling effect by limiting evaporative cooling, though.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At this point I'll stick with being quite comfortable year round here in San Diego/Oceanside and have slower palm growth.... I can enjoy each frond longer?  :D

(Please exempt our past January from the norm)

Zone 10a at best after 2007 AND 2013, on SW facing hill, 1 1/2 miles from coast in Oceanside, CA. 30-98 degrees, and 45-80deg. about 95% of the time.

"The great workman of nature is time."

"Genius is nothing but a great aptitude for patience."

-George-Louis Leclerc de Buffon-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(BS, Man about Palms @ Jun. 14 2007,22:07)

QUOTE
At this point I'll stick with being quite comfortable year round here in San Diego/Oceanside and have slower palm growth.... I can enjoy each frond longer?  :D

(Please exempt our past January from the norm)

Agree with you Bill.  Marine air is kicking up humidity.  Low 90's lately but cool nights  :D

Los Angeles/Pasadena

34° 10' N   118° 18' W

Elevation: 910'/278m

January Average Hi/Lo: 69F/50F

July Average Hi/Lo: 88F/66F

Average Rainfall: 19"/48cm

USDA 11/Sunset 23

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/queryF?MTW

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If y'all want to get really technical, you need to look at the psychrometric chart.  The human comfort zone is a trapezoidal area on the chart in which the temperature and humidity ranges are comfortable for a normal, resting person without heat or air conditioning.  Here's an example:  http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/EH/EH22100.pdf  Trace out the temps and humidities and see if you agree.

Steve

USDA Zone 9a/b, AHS Heat Zone 9, Sunset Zone 28

49'/14m above sea level, 25mi/40km to Galveston Bay

Long-term average rainfall 47.84"/1215mm

Near-term (7yr) average rainfall 55.44"/1410mm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interior Florida is a furnace. And the afternoon thunderstorms can create a sauna if too early. But, many evenings it DOES NOT RAIN yet there are outflow boundaries created from rain cooled air from inland storms that make for incredible evenings nearer to the coast.

Parrish, FL

Zone 9B

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahhhhhh summer rains. Summer storms. Beautiful things. Lots of humidity. Kind of reminds me of that 80's Toto song "Africa".

Unfortunately summer rains do not often happen here, or winter rains for that matter.

regards

Tyrone

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only factor that makes the Florida heat and humidity more bearable is the nearly constant sea breeze we experience. It's kind of like the tradewinds. I tend to think of Florida as Carribean and California as Mediterrean.Apple/Orange.

What you look for is what is looking

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(steve 9atx @ Jun. 14 2007,20:58)

QUOTE
If y'all want to get really technical, you need to look at the psychrometric chart.  The human comfort zone is a trapezoidal area on the chart in which the temperature and humidity ranges are comfortable for a normal, resting person without heat or air conditioning.  Here's an example:  http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/EH/EH22100.pdf  Trace out the temps and humidities and see if you agree.

Steve

Steve, I haven't used my "sling psycrometer" (sp)  in years. But I do measure wet bulb/dry bulb temps weekly if not daily through my job repairing heating and Air Conditioning units.  :D

Zone 10a at best after 2007 AND 2013, on SW facing hill, 1 1/2 miles from coast in Oceanside, CA. 30-98 degrees, and 45-80deg. about 95% of the time.

"The great workman of nature is time."

"Genius is nothing but a great aptitude for patience."

-George-Louis Leclerc de Buffon-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interior Florida is a furnace. And the afternoon thunderstorms can create a sauna if too early. But, many evenings it DOES NOT RAIN yet there are outflow boundaries created from rain cooled air from inland storms that make for incredible evenings nearer to the coast.

That's why it's important to live near the coast in FL... I would never want to live inland.

Bobby

Long Island, New York  Zone 7a (where most of the southern Floridians are originally from)

AVERAGE TEMPS

Summer Highs  : 85-90f/day,  68-75f / night

Winter Lows     : 38-45f/day,   25-35f / night

Extreme Low    : 10-20f/day,    0-10f / night   but VERY RARE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our Forecast for the next 4 days.. I'm loving it. :)

Saturday, Jun 16, Warmer with partial sunshine Low: 66 °F High: 81 °F

Sunday, Jun 17, warm with some sun, Low: 69 °F High: 88 °F

Monday, Jun 18, Partly sunny and hot, Low: 69 °F High: 90 °F

Tuesday, Jun 19,Partly sunny and hot  Low: 70 °F High: 93 °F

Bobby

Long Island, New York  Zone 7a (where most of the southern Floridians are originally from)

AVERAGE TEMPS

Summer Highs  : 85-90f/day,  68-75f / night

Winter Lows     : 38-45f/day,   25-35f / night

Extreme Low    : 10-20f/day,    0-10f / night   but VERY RARE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is a data point from last night.  I get home @5:30PM and the temp in the backyard is 108 F with 11% humidity, enough to wilt humans and palms.  the wind is less than 5 mph.  I run the sprinkler for 1 hour and the temps drop to 84 F with 24% humidity, very nice to sit out in.  

I just came back from NJ visiting relatives and saw typical temps of 80-86F with 40% humidity at around the same time of day.  I like the west because I can put humidity in the air, I cant take it out though back east.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(steve 9atx @ Jun. 14 2007,23:58)

QUOTE
If y'all want to get really technical, you need to look at the psychrometric chart.  The human comfort zone is a trapezoidal area on the chart in which the temperature and humidity ranges are comfortable for a normal, resting person without heat or air conditioning.  Here's an example:  http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/EH/EH22100.pdf  Trace out the temps and humidities and see if you agree.

Steve

The psychometric chart basically cover the bodys ability to maintain the core temp.  When temp of surface skin rises, its an indication that the body is generating/ absorbing heat it cannot shed due to ambient temps/humidity, sun exposure(radiative heating).  I have studied skin surface temps out here(part of the job) and they are always higher when the humidity hits(max heat index, lower absolute temps) in august, even though the ambient temps may drop from say 113 to 106 degrees, while humidity rises from 12-15% to 40-45%.  During this humid season, its better to enjoy the edges of the day outside, as we are every bit as hot(heat index) as florida then.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(ruskinPalms @ Jun. 15 2007,00:51)

QUOTE
Interior Florida is a furnace. And the afternoon thunderstorms can create a sauna if too early. But, many evenings it DOES NOT RAIN yet there are outflow boundaries created from rain cooled air from inland storms that make for incredible evenings nearer to the coast.

Bill

Agree entirely and envy you for that nightly display of nature la grande :P

If the monsoon develops then thunderstorms build over the desert & mountains during afternoons.  The blow-off over LA in the evening can  deliver sporadic/scattered light showers but mostly just beautiful sunsets of spreading cumolulomnimbus clouds.  That's as close the upper trade winds get to coastal Cali.

bubba

Good explanation but both orange/orange  :laugh:

Los Angeles/Pasadena

34° 10' N   118° 18' W

Elevation: 910'/278m

January Average Hi/Lo: 69F/50F

July Average Hi/Lo: 88F/66F

Average Rainfall: 19"/48cm

USDA 11/Sunset 23

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/queryF?MTW

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(BobbyinNY @ Jun. 15 2007,09:18)

QUOTE
Interior Florida is a furnace. And the afternoon thunderstorms can create a sauna if too early. But, many evenings it DOES NOT RAIN yet there are outflow boundaries created from rain cooled air from inland storms that make for incredible evenings nearer to the coast.

That's why it's important to live near the coast in FL... I would never want to live inland.

Personally I have never been able to find a reason to live anywhere but by the coast in Florida.  Unless maybe one lived in north Florida.  I always thought of central Florida as a place to drive through to get to somewhere else.  But, then that is my opinion.

I have been out in the jungle for a while and am impressed by how much play the subject on humidity has gotten.  The important thing is to enjoy where you live whatever the climate may be.  And, if you don't like it move to where you do.  So, I am here in the humidity capital of the world and like it just fine.  We are in the doldrums and don't have trade winds at this latitude.  What is different from South Florida is that a rain storm does cool things down markedly.  When it gets real hot you normally can count on  a rain storm.  The only exception to this is the drier season months of August through October.  Real hot weather may or may not generate a storm.  When we get big thunderstorms here they are accomanied by strong down draft winds which drives cool air down to the surface.  Right before the rain hits you normally feel a blast of cool air hit you.  Then after the storm it normally stays cooler.  That is unless the sun comes right out, then it heats right back up again.  

On Wednesday night I ended up driving in the dark a few hours.  It was not late, around 730 PM, but it always gets dark at 6 PM on the equator.  I was just over the equator line driving north in the country and hit a real nasty pot hole in the road.  It had been raining off and on during the day.  I stopped my car to take a look at the tires to see if they were ok.  When I stepped out of the car I felt the most pleasant cool Humid temperature of the equatorial rainy season.  I suppose it was about 70 F or so.  What was amazing though was when I looked up at the sky.  The stars were so bright and there were so many that it left me breathless for a moment.  It was like the night sky reached out and grabbed me. Here I was in the middle of nowhere surrounded by forest and a few cow pastures on a road with almost no traffic standing in the middle of the road looking up at the stars.  The humid air envelped me with the smell of the forest near and the night sounds of frogs.    That five minutes really gave me a reality check as to where I was.  And, it was a great rest break from dodging pot holes in the dark.  

The humid nights of equatorial Amazonia are incredible and add skies they are beyond description.

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bravo Don  :P  A superb glimmer into your incredible world.

Hate to be the spoiler but reality is quite different some 30 degrees north latitude.  An article in New York Times:

 The First Domed City

Timothy Egan / June 16, 2007

PHOENIX

Every week, more than 2,000 people move to the Valley of Sun, to a metro area nearly as big in size as the state of New Jersey. They come from Pittsburgh, from Buffalo, from Cleveland, from Fargo — from yesterday to tomorrow.

A city equal to Rochester plants itself here every two years. And what they find is a compelling urban experiment: nearly four million people trying to live in the Sonoran Desert, and live with what they had at home — golf courses, lakes, perennial green. But they also learn that summer is winter, in the sense that Phoenicians stay indoors this time of year, hunkered inside a climate-controlled world, and plan their extended midday excursions like an astronaut going for a space walk. In the stillness of late-afternoon, you wonder: where is everybody?

Phoenix, even more than the other desert metropolis of Las Vegas, is the new American city. People come here because nobody has a past, and because houses are still cheap and because when the snow reached the roofline they finally said: That’s it! I’ve had it.

But what if this place — so new the Bubble Wrap is barely off the red-tiled roofs of neighborhoods named for whatever they displaced — became uninhabitable? What if the climate models that predict the American West heating up faster than any other part of the country proved all too accurate?

If you live here, you know what it means when the sun becomes an enemy. On Thursday, it was 110 degrees. Yesterday, same thing. Too hot to leave a dog or a child in a car without risking their lives. Your skin stings. You feel your brain swelling while waiting for the air-conditioning when you get in the oven of a parked car.

About 800 people will be hospitalized, on average, for heat-related maladies in the coming months, and some will die, mostly the very young and the very old.

As heat waves go, this week’s mercury-topper is nothing special. It’s been 121 degrees — the all-time high. But if you look at the trends and the long-term predictions by the United Nations climate panel, you wonder how our signature New City will adapt. The average temperature of Phoenix has risen five degrees since the 1960s, according to the National Weather Service. Five of the warmest years ever recorded have occurred since 2000.

A few years ago, The Arizona Republic predicted that average temperatures in Phoenix might rise by 15 to 20 degrees over a generation, due to something called the urban heat island effect. The more parking lots and Dilbert-filled buildings are slapped over the desert floor, the more heat stays trapped in the valley. On top of that is climate change.

“All of the models say in the next 50 years this place is really going to heat up,” said Robert Balling, a climatologist at Arizona State University.

Outside the city, the forests of Arizona are dying, stressed by drought and rising temperatures. A fire that burned an area the size of metro Phoenix five years ago is seen as a terrifying precursor. What scientists have found is that there’s a threshold at which the forest ecosystem collapses. They’ve looked at droughts going back to the time of the Hohokam, who built canals here, and cannot find anything like the present crash.

Is there a similar point at which the city becomes imperiled? The skeptics say: No, we can engineer our way around it. Look at the ballpark where the Diamondbacks play baseball: It has a retractable roof, which is closed while the stadium is cooled by industrial-strength air-conditioning and then opened in the evening.

Or behold the great veins of the Central Arizona Project, bringing water from the Colorado River to fountains in Scottsdale. The fast-evaporating water courses through the city as it bakes, making it livable.

To their credit, residents are using less water, deploying the sun to power air-conditioning, putting in desert landscaping — cacti and stones, not bluegrass and ponds. I do not doubt that innovation will continue to make it easier to defy the heat. But it’s one thing to bring runoff from the Rocky Mountains to the desert floor. It’s another to bring alpine air to streets and parks and backyards, unless you put a dome over the whole city.

Wallace Stegner always said it was his hope that the West could build cities to match the setting. He never predicted that the setting would be the problem.

Timothy Egan, a former Seattle correspondent for The Times and the author of “The Worst Hard Time,” is a guest columnist.

Los Angeles/Pasadena

34° 10' N   118° 18' W

Elevation: 910'/278m

January Average Hi/Lo: 69F/50F

July Average Hi/Lo: 88F/66F

Average Rainfall: 19"/48cm

USDA 11/Sunset 23

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/queryF?MTW

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happ,

That is pretty scary information.  In reality you hit on one of the great problems of humanity today, WATER.   Here where I live I think we have 15 percent of all fresh water in the world.  The largest reserve I believe is  in Canada.  Both here and Canada are pretty inaccessable and moving the water to where it could be used by more people would be very difficult.  I remember speculating on the problems to be faced by increased population in the US Southwest when I was studying Geography 30 years ago.  My major professor was a great student of the Sonoran desert and this area was a subject that came up frequently with him.

It will be interesting to see what the future will bring.  

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happ, I will take your Navel Oranges over ours any day. Particularly, those large ones with extremely thick skin.I think our Oranges are a little better for juice because of our humidity.

What you look for is what is looking

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(happ @ Jun. 16 2007,11:49)

QUOTE
Bravo Don  :P  A superb glimmer into your incredible world.

Hate to be the spoiler but reality is quite different some 30 degrees north latitude.  An article in New York Times:

 The First Domed City

Timothy Egan / June 16, 2007

PHOENIX

Every week, more than 2,000 people move to the Valley of Sun, to a metro area nearly as big in size as the state of New Jersey. They come from Pittsburgh, from Buffalo, from Cleveland, from Fargo — from yesterday to tomorrow.

A city equal to Rochester plants itself here every two years. And what they find is a compelling urban experiment: nearly four million people trying to live in the Sonoran Desert, and live with what they had at home — golf courses, lakes, perennial green. But they also learn that summer is winter, in the sense that Phoenicians stay indoors this time of year, hunkered inside a climate-controlled world, and plan their extended midday excursions like an astronaut going for a space walk. In the stillness of late-afternoon, you wonder: where is everybody?

Phoenix, even more than the other desert metropolis of Las Vegas, is the new American city. People come here because nobody has a past, and because houses are still cheap and because when the snow reached the roofline they finally said: That’s it! I’ve had it.

But what if this place — so new the Bubble Wrap is barely off the red-tiled roofs of neighborhoods named for whatever they displaced — became uninhabitable? What if the climate models that predict the American West heating up faster than any other part of the country proved all too accurate?

If you live here, you know what it means when the sun becomes an enemy. On Thursday, it was 110 degrees. Yesterday, same thing. Too hot to leave a dog or a child in a car without risking their lives. Your skin stings. You feel your brain swelling while waiting for the air-conditioning when you get in the oven of a parked car.

About 800 people will be hospitalized, on average, for heat-related maladies in the coming months, and some will die, mostly the very young and the very old.

As heat waves go, this week’s mercury-topper is nothing special. It’s been 121 degrees — the all-time high. But if you look at the trends and the long-term predictions by the United Nations climate panel, you wonder how our signature New City will adapt. The average temperature of Phoenix has risen five degrees since the 1960s, according to the National Weather Service. Five of the warmest years ever recorded have occurred since 2000.

A few years ago, The Arizona Republic predicted that average temperatures in Phoenix might rise by 15 to 20 degrees over a generation, due to something called the urban heat island effect. The more parking lots and Dilbert-filled buildings are slapped over the desert floor, the more heat stays trapped in the valley. On top of that is climate change.

“All of the models say in the next 50 years this place is really going to heat up,” said Robert Balling, a climatologist at Arizona State University.

Outside the city, the forests of Arizona are dying, stressed by drought and rising temperatures. A fire that burned an area the size of metro Phoenix five years ago is seen as a terrifying precursor. What scientists have found is that there’s a threshold at which the forest ecosystem collapses. They’ve looked at droughts going back to the time of the Hohokam, who built canals here, and cannot find anything like the present crash.

Is there a similar point at which the city becomes imperiled? The skeptics say: No, we can engineer our way around it. Look at the ballpark where the Diamondbacks play baseball: It has a retractable roof, which is closed while the stadium is cooled by industrial-strength air-conditioning and then opened in the evening.

Or behold the great veins of the Central Arizona Project, bringing water from the Colorado River to fountains in Scottsdale. The fast-evaporating water courses through the city as it bakes, making it livable.

To their credit, residents are using less water, deploying the sun to power air-conditioning, putting in desert landscaping — cacti and stones, not bluegrass and ponds. I do not doubt that innovation will continue to make it easier to defy the heat. But it’s one thing to bring runoff from the Rocky Mountains to the desert floor. It’s another to bring alpine air to streets and parks and backyards, unless you put a dome over the whole city.

Wallace Stegner always said it was his hope that the West could build cities to match the setting. He never predicted that the setting would be the problem.

Timothy Egan, a former Seattle correspondent for The Times and the author of “The Worst Hard Time,” is a guest columnist.

A little look into the stats would have helped Mr egan to understand that its the nightime lows in winter that are way up.  The first 5 years I lived here it didnt even freeze in winter.  In the 60's it froze frequently.  Out in the undeveloped desert it is 5-10 degrees cooler at night.  The '07 freeze registered 22 degrees in my backyard, 20 miles south in the desert(coolidge) it was 16F, parts of center phx were 26-27F.  The concrete is a big passive solar rock, it mostly effects the nightime lows.  Before all the concrete, the winter temps were lower, as now out in the desert hinterlands.  The summer high temps are generally lower than palm springs california or lake havasu, AZ or Yuma AZ, even after this "big increase" in temps.  Are those places "heat islands" with 4 million people or just hotter places in the past AND now?  And his temps must have been on the sky harbor airport tarmac, a real passive solar hotspot.  I didnt see even 110F, let alone 121F in my backyard!  As for future weather forecasts, I'm not holding my breath on those, its tough enough to predict the weather in a month, let alone years in advance.  this spring was cooler than any I remember.  We have had no water restrictions, but I dont let sinks run, use a front loading washer(40% less water), dont hang in the shower.  Until my overhead canopy is grown in, I use water to keep my palms happy in the dry/hot.  Once the monsoon hits in july(40-45% humidity), drip irriation once a week is plenty for them.  At that time the pool becomes almost useless in mid-day due to the humidity, alot like orlando florida.  

The "forrests" around phoenix are suharo cactus and seem fine.  Forrest fires up on the rim(<100 miles away) have occurred, though the big ones were set by man and offenders were caught and punished.  Mid day is pool time, if you have an umbrella/ shade over the pool.  I was outside under the umbrella with my grand kids enjoying the water this weekend for 2-3 hours each day.  I had to drag them from the pool to go inside.  When the humidity is low, 82-84 degrees in the AC is pretty nice, no need for turning it down so much.  There is now a question whether xeriscapes are the most energy/water efficient way, they tend to make your yard hot with passive solar and your house hot(low shade), making the need for AC power higher.  Trees are good here for cutting the heat outside, I just use the toughest ones(desert trees) on the west side to shade my house in the hottest time of the day(prevent passive solar) to keep the yard temps down, limit AC bills.  It also limits the water demands of the palms, having late day shade.

Sun cancer is high down here, and is a concern, excessive sun exposure is cautioned.  I've seen fools come back from florida full of blisters, and that can happen here as well.  If you want to see people in mid day, look in the shade, or in the water parks, or fitness clubs, not on the golf course.  Also alot of people drive up to the mogollion rim(6K feet 75 degrees), sedona or flagstaff on weekends.

It sure is a different culture here, and I wouldnt expect a seattle journalist to understand it.  He is right that our summer is his winter, we dont spend alot of time outside in direct(non shaded) mid-day sun, but then he doesnt run around in the seattle winter in his underwear either.  Still this morning at 78 degrees, 20% humidity, that hot coffee was just great outside.  Even for those without a pool, "house bound" has a different meaning if its only for part of the day.  Cold and humidity, are all day events in those northeast winters.  When he's holed up, depressed from low serotonin in the seattle wet season, our 65 degree sunny winter days are very nice.  Thats when you lay outside all day long, but still mostly in the shade.  When people were stranded in the snow in the northwest this past winter, out daytime highs were 60 degrees with nice warm sun.

As far as housing being cheap, not anymore, unless $150/sq ft and up is cheap(Atlanta is cheaper).  5 years ago its was $90/sf.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Follow this link regarding artificial highs generated by poor temperature measuring techniques.  I am convinced that this has much to do with the "warming" going on:

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x....13.html

Steve

USDA Zone 9a/b, AHS Heat Zone 9, Sunset Zone 28

49'/14m above sea level, 25mi/40km to Galveston Bay

Long-term average rainfall 47.84"/1215mm

Near-term (7yr) average rainfall 55.44"/1410mm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom,

Thank you for the view of the weather from your area.  I guess where ever people are the challanges of urban growth and resource use are great.  And, water probably presents the greatest challange.  

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't lived where it was dry but I have traveled extensively to Colorado and southern California.  I can't stand the dry heat.  Dry skin, parched lips, bloody nose.  At the same time, inland Florida, especially the Orlando area, is much hotter than south Florida.  I lived many years in Jacksonville and it is very hot and very cold.  Here in Palm Beach county we are typically cooler in the summer than central and north Florida, especially inland areas.  We have the breezes that blow in from the ocean and across Lake Okeechobee to help keep us cool.  I don't mind sweating in the summer heat.  When I had my barn built I had an outdoor shower built and when I get too hot, I just turn it on and it cools me off.  Serves 2 purposes - keeps me cool and washes most of the dirt off before I go inside.

I was 13 before we had air-conditioning.  But the houses were built up off the ground so there was airflow underneath them.  Lots of windows and huge attic fans.  Crack the windows and turn on the fan and there was a nice breeze blowing all through the house.

Don,  Manaus sounds divine with its cool evenings.  Soft tropical nights - very sensual.

Palmmermaid

Kitty Philips

West Palm Beach, FL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the point of this discussion is that EVERYWHERE in the southern US is very HOT in the summer, just in different ways.  It all depends on whether you like dry heat or humid heat, as to which one you think is worse.  Orlando, Tampa and Jax, FL are very hot.  New Orleans is very hot and humid.  Dallas, Houston and San Antonio are very hot and humid (and see lots of 100s in interior TX).  Phx, Tuscon and LV are very hot and dry, interior Cal is hot.  Like I said, everywhere in the southern tier is hot.  On a side note, driving across Texas from Orange to El Paso, you will pass through every climate zone in the southern US.  It would be like driving from Jacksonville FL (equivalent to Orange TX as far as heat and humidity) to somewhere in the desert SW (equivalent to El Paso as far as dry heat).  You can feel the humidity pick up the closer you are to the gulf in TX or the further you drive east.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(amazondk @ Jun. 19 2007,07:56)

QUOTE
Tom,

Thank you for the view of the weather from your area.  I guess where ever people are the challanges of urban growth and resource use are great.  And, water probably presents the greatest challange.  

dk

Don, As a chemistry student 20 years ago, it was often discussed that water purification would be the only answer to the human devastation of natural waters.  I worked a student co-op at the federal EPA, and had access to maps of KNOWN dumpsites, as well as data from "cleaned up sites" which are never even close to being clean enough to drink.  There was also illegal dumping, as it was very profitable.  Water filtration will be mandatory at some point in the future for everyone.  In AZ, we(my family) ONLY drink filtered water(R.O.) as the natural metals content of desert soils has a potential for chronic toxicity in some metals.  The water back east USA where I grew up is dirty in toxins from many old manufacturing operations.  Because each toxin must be specificly tested for, and there are thousands of potential toxins, much goes unnoticed.  I hope the amazon watershed remains clean so the many endemic species are not threatened.  I also hope the trees will be spared the saw as they are a key balancing component of the global thermal balance.

Some more comments on desert living:  Housing and autos last much longer($$), no rusting, rotting from rain and snow.  I tend to drive much less than back east, and then on highways instead of secondary roads.  We dont use much wood to build houses, more stucco and chickenwire.  No hurricanes floods or tornadoes EVER occur here, and never heard of an earthquake near here.  

Water is not in shortage in the world, but desalinated, pure water is.  I expect that the cost for water in the future will be higher, but theres plenty there for humans in the seas.  Still, the wild natural places need to be maintained so that natural clean water is available to the many plants and animals that make up the environmental balance.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my complaint about our low humidity: Winter radiational cooling. When it reaches 60 on a typical January day here, it drops to freezing by dawn.  And when the pressure is really high, wind is calm, and the humidity is low, watch out -- a 55 degree day is routinely followed by a 30+ degree drop.  The only thing that saves us from a 20 degree low every winter is a bit of breeze or cloud.

In summer, we benefit from that same lack of humidity (it bottoms out in the teens) -- our days are 90 plus, and dawns are 40 degrees cooler, and as a result, open windows at night and closed windows during the day provide all the AC we need.

Jon T

Jon T-Central CA coastal valley foothills-9A

Forever seeking juania australis...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom,

For the most part the water in the rivers is quite clean.  The shear volume of water dilutes pollutants from the cities to a large degree.  And, there are not many cities anyway.  Sewage treatment is still a big problem all over Brazil.  As to trees the legislation on forest management mandates that set backs on watercourses are maintained as areas of permanent preservation.  Not that this is always followed, but on forestry projects it is.  This ranges from 30 meters on the banks of small streams to 500 meters for larger rivers.  As to taking saws to trees.  That is actually where I make my livelyhood as my business is exporting hardwood lumber.  The lumber business actually is one of the best mechanisms for preserving the standing forest as it adds value to the forest through sustainable forest management.  I have gone into this subject before on other threads as there is a lot of misinformation about the whole subject of our forest and its role in the world.  The conversion of forest land to raise cattle and grow soy beans in large scale plantations is the main danger to the standing forest.  The forest actually is great influence on our local climate.  That is one of the reasons the nights here are normally quite pleasant.  And, in the country it can seem quite cold.  Cold is 70 F though around here.

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(amazondk @ Jun. 19 2007,16:55)

QUOTE
Tom,

For the most part the water in the rivers is quite clean.  The shear volume of water dilutes pollutants from the cities to a large degree.  And, there are not many cities anyway.  Sewage treatment is still a big problem all over Brazil.  As to trees the legislation on forest management mandates that set backs on watercourses are maintained as areas of permanent preservation.  Not that this is always followed, but on forestry projects it is.  This ranges from 30 meters on the banks of small streams to 500 meters for larger rivers.  As to taking saws to trees.  That is actually where I make my livelyhood as my business is exporting hardwood lumber.  The lumber business actually is one of the best mechanisms for preserving the standing forest as it adds value to the forest through sustainable forest management.  I have gone into this subject before on other threads as there is a lot of misinformation about the whole subject of our forest and its role in the world.  The conversion of forest land to raise cattle and grow soy beans in large scale plantations is the main danger to the standing forest.  The forest actually is great influence on our local climate.  That is one of the reasons the nights here are normally quite pleasant.  And, in the country it can seem quite cold.  Cold is 70 F though around here.

dk

Sounds really good Don, I like the sound of consciencious management of the worlds greatest forrest.  In my experience, Brazilian lumber is outstanding in every way.  I have a "plantation grown" brazilian cherry hardwood floor that is astonishing in my living room, it makes north american cherry look plain, and is much more durable(3x the hardness).  Its so beautiful that I cant put north american wood furniture in the same room, makes it look like plastic.  I started to wonder/worry about the "plantation grown" description.  I wanted to buy from a company that used sound resource management practices.  Its milled in brazil, shipped to the UA and coated here.  It constitutes one room in my house, perhaps I will get more now that I have more information about the renewable resource management in the industry.  Im glad to hear from someone who knows first hand.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom,

There is no such thing as plantation grown Brazilian Cherry, or Jatoba as it is know here.  That does not mean that the wood comes from an illegal source.  But, those people who supply the wood should be a little more honest about how things happen.  Jatoba is a very common wood species in the area and is the main species sold to the US market.  If you need any references of companies who deal in sustainable forestry let me know.  I can probably give you some leads on where to go.  I am glad you enjoy your floor, it is a beautiful wood.

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yesterday I noticed a perfect example of an extreme we get, but not too unusual around here.

The weatherman was showing the humidity levels through the county for a recent "dry" day with the "June gloom" lead in....It was 64% humidity here in Oceanside (I'm sure right on the coast, I'm 1 mile away) and 20+ miles inland to the east, it was 13% humidity  in Escondido.

Zone 10a at best after 2007 AND 2013, on SW facing hill, 1 1/2 miles from coast in Oceanside, CA. 30-98 degrees, and 45-80deg. about 95% of the time.

"The great workman of nature is time."

"Genius is nothing but a great aptitude for patience."

-George-Louis Leclerc de Buffon-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(BS, Man about Palms @ Jun. 22 2007,00:55)

QUOTE
Yesterday I noticed a perfect example of an extreme we get, but not too unusual around here.

The weatherman was showing the humidity levels through the county for a recent "dry" day with the "June gloom" lead in....It was 64% humidity here in Oceanside (I'm sure right on the coast, I'm 1 mile away) and 20+ miles inland to the east, it was 13% humidity  in Escondido.

And in phoenix it was 8% humidity.  The microclimate variations in socal are amazing.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...