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Found cheap rhapidophyllum hystrix!


mdsonofthesouth

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Found these and almost bought them out! With tax it was more than acceptable price for these hard to find palms. Going to be planting some back bones for my garden with these when I get back home and might grab some more when I come back! They also had a good mess of southern yellow pines that I might get as well if they have longleaf. Going to make a groove of slash longleaf and loblooly with needles minors and yuccas sprinkled in. 

 

Anyways I know they are boring around here, but nice to finally start sourcing these for my projects and wife was happy to hear they won't need protection lol.

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  • Upvote 8

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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Ugh.Wish I could find any cold hardy palm by me.I can't even get a windmill around here...My only option is online.

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Make sure you protect them a little if it gets below 15degrees since they are still fairly young!

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But they have a squat profile, my thinking is get then into the ground if you are willing to protect them in the winter. Better growth in the ground than in containers. A black fifteen gallon container turned over them would work fine. Wrap heaver insulation around the container if a heavy cold blast is forecast. Two to three years they should be pretty well established and acclimated.

Good score - get more :D

  • Upvote 1

Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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57 minutes ago, Nj Palms said:

Make sure you protect them a little if it gets below 15degrees since they are still fairly young!

 

25 minutes ago, Moose said:

But they have a squat profile, my thinking is get then into the ground if you are willing to protect them in the winter. Better growth in the ground than in containers. A black fifteen gallon container turned over them would work fine. Wrap heaver insulation around the container if a heavy cold blast is forecast. Two to three years they should be pretty well established and acclimated.

Good score - get more :D

 

These are naturalized here so no worries! Can't wait to start building some scrub and backbone. Have had plans for needles for a while!

  • Upvote 1

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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8 minutes ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

 

These are naturalized here so no worries! Can't wait to start building some scrub and backbone. Have had plans for needles for a while!

Do you know the source? Could have been propagated in Florida. A little protection in the beginning may not be a bad thing.

If you are not worried, then go for it, tough love may be just fine.

I'm in USDA zone 10b, what do I know about zone 7 to 8? :D

Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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26 minutes ago, Moose said:

Do you know the source? Could have been propagated in Florida. A little protection in the beginning may not be a bad thing.

If you are not worried, then go for it, tough love may be just fine.

I'm in USDA zone 10b, what do I know about zone 7 to 8? :D

 

These most likely were from Florida, like most of my palms. I may mulch them a little but I will treat them like my yucca gloriosa and leave them alone. They will be cared for well I can assure you, but they will see the full brunt of our humid subtropical zone 7 weather lol.

Edited by mdsonofthesouth

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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This has quickly become one of my favourite palms! I was always put off by its slow growth but having purchased my first one last year, it's not been anywhere near as slow as I thought. This year it flowered too! It sits in a pot outside my front door.

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Great score. A well grown needle palm is a thing of beauty. I'm glad to see so many people on here growing them. They deserve greater cultivation as a native US palm.

  • Upvote 2

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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Many of the Sabals are too slow growing for most nurseries to produce commercially. And Sabal minors usually can't survive being dug up and shipped because their growing points are underground. You'd do better buying seeds from a reliable source and growing your own. You'd have a good sized palm in 4-5 years. One place that does sell its own germinated Sabal minor varieties is PDN in Raleigh, NC. Most sell out very quickly and aren't cheap but at least you know what you're getting. If you want collector palms expect to pay for them.

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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On 6/28/2018, 1:54:08, PalmatierMeg said:

Great score. A well grown needle palm is a thing of beauty. I'm glad to see so many people on here growing them. They deserve greater cultivation as a native US palm.

 

I agree 100%!

 

23 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Nice find! I wish I could find Sabal monor that size in stores... 

 

I'm looking at getting a few of these as well. Plant delights has a whole mess minors I am looking at getting. Will likely not plant them till 2019 though.

 

16 hours ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Many of the Sabals are too slow growing for most nurseries to produce commercially. And Sabal minors usually can't survive being dug up and shipped because their growing points are underground. You'd do better buying seeds from a reliable source and growing your own. You'd have a good sized palm in 4-5 years. One place that does sell its own germinated Sabal minor varieties is PDN in Raleigh, NC. Most sell out very quickly and aren't cheap but at least you know what you're getting. If you want collector palms expect to pay for them.

 

I have a wishlist over there with a selection of sabal minors and other palms. Hoping to get a few for next year.

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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1 hour ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

I'm looking at getting a few of these as well. Plant delights has a whole mess minors I am looking at getting. Will likely not plant them till 2019 though.

I was looking at some of the Sabal minor as well but some of the prices are kind of "eh" (on certine varieties). Although you have to keep into consideration that they grow really slowly and they have to get the seed from everywhere (for the specific varietys). 

  • Upvote 1

PalmTreeDude

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I’m raising up a bunch of Rhapidophyllum seedlings from a small, undocumented population in Chambers County, Alabama.  It’s very close to the extreme northern edge of their range (the farthest north documented population is in Bibb County, AL).  The hope is that they will be hardier than any Needle Palm from Florida.  Kinda makes sense to me!

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Nice find. I wasn’t always a fan of them, but owning one has changed that for me. They genuinely look nice, especially in a partially shaded environment.

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Good find.  Those should do great for you there.  You find them occasionally up there at the big box stores even.  The gorgeous one I got online came from 9B in south centeral FL.   Since I moved to zone 10A in St. Petersburg, I left it in VA Beach at a family members home where it will likely grow into a gorgeous adult palm.  

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On 7/1/2018, 10:45:56, PalmTreeDude said:

I was looking at some of the Sabal minor as well but some of the prices are kind of "eh" (on certine varieties). Although you have to keep into consideration that they grow really slowly and they have to get the seed from everywhere (for the specific varietys). 

 

Yeah their prices aren't the best but they do have a good variety.

 

On 7/1/2018, 11:13:02, Bigfish said:

I’m raising up a bunch of Rhapidophyllum seedlings from a small, undocumented population in Chambers County, Alabama.  It’s very close to the extreme northern edge of their range (the farthest north documented population is in Bibb County, AL).  The hope is that they will be hardier than any Needle Palm from Florida.  Kinda makes sense to me!

 

Yeah I'm not lucky enough to get these easily. Trachycarpus or livistona or chamaerops or butia are all common and easy to find around here. But rhapidophyllum isn't easy to find so $18 a pop wasn't a bad deal for the size!

 

On 7/1/2018, 1:12:39, cm05 said:

Nice find. I wasn’t always a fan of them, but owning one has changed that for me. They genuinely look nice, especially in a partially shaded environment.

 

Was the original palm I wanted until I found I could grow others!

 

On 7/1/2018, 1:26:08, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

Good find.  Those should do great for you there.  You find them occasionally up there at the big box stores even.  The gorgeous one I got online came from 9B in south centeral FL.   Since I moved to zone 10A in St. Petersburg, I left it in VA Beach at a family members home where it will likely grow into a gorgeous adult palm.  

 

Yeah they are pretty bulletproof here and will make a decent backbone for my gardens. Might even grab some more as I am heading back to the beach to pick up the wife and kids.

  • Upvote 1

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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If they are already hard to find in the US, imagine Switzerland! Impossible! I was all the happier to find this one single specimen among many Chamaerops and Trachycarpus and the price was very reasonable too. Sadly, they aren't always bulletproof where I live. My last one carked it after only -10C.20180709_124859.thumb.jpg.ffad48ebf2d2c3

Edited by Flow
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Nice palm! I planted mine the other day, and just gave all my plants a shot of sea kelp and fish fert. 

 

 

 

  • Upvote 4

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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Wow, thanks for sharing your collection! You should start your own thread with that. Anyway, I am interested in you growing that Chinese fan palm in your climate! 

Edited by Swolte
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4 hours ago, Swolte said:

Wow, thanks for sharing your collection! You should start your own thread with that. Anyway, I am interested in you growing that Chinese fan palm in your climate! 

 

Thanks! Still a lot of work to do. Essentially trunk hardy, but 99% defoliation. Be interesting to see how tall they get before they stop being trunk/bud hardy. But they start pushing out in early April timeframes maybe sooner or later depending on spring. 

Edited by mdsonofthesouth
  • Upvote 1

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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